Nanomaterials Applied in Water Treatments

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020) | Viewed by 11369

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Math & Science Department, United States Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, NY 11024, USA
Interests: nanocomposite; magnetic separation; recoverability; reusability; oil-water separation; water treatment; water disinfection; antimicrobial activity; environmental applications; nano-education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,                

Maritime transport plays an important role in world economy since it accounts for over 80% of global merchandise trade by volume and more than 70% of its value. The vessel operation, however, routinely generates large amounts of wastewaters that require periodic discharges. These wastewaters contain oil and grease, pathogens, or harmful chemicals such as suspended solids and heavy metals. If not properly treated or controlled, the discharges pollute the marine environment, negatively impacting ecosystems and human health.

Nanotechnology is the study and use of materials at particle size measured at nanometers. At this small size, materials behave in unconventional ways and exhibit new and size-dependent properties. Since new properties allow for new applications, this makes nanoscale materials extremely exciting. Nanotechnology is thus most promising for creating new methods that will more effectively remove and detect pollutants in water discharges than the conventional ones.

This Special Issue is to publish exciting research in support of the development of novel and eco-friendly nanomaterials that help create new technologies for preventing marine pollution, especially that may relate to shipping. It is also to provide a rapid turn-around time regarding reviewing and publishing, and to disseminate the articles freely for research, teaching, and reference purposes.

High quality papers are encouraged for publication, directly related to various aspects of marine envioronmental nanomaterials’ development and use, as mentioned below. Novel technologies, improving or replacing current technologies, are encouraged.

  • Removing oil from water
  • Water disinfection
  • Removing heavy metals from water
  • Water pollutant detection
  • Removing organic or inorganic pollutants from water
  • Self-assembly and structural/functional modification of nanomaterials
  • Nano-photocatalysis materials
  • Nanocomposites

Dr. Ping Y. Furlan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine Environment
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanocomposites
  • Nanotechnology
  • Water Treatment
  • Water Disinfection
  • Water Pollutant Detection

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 3455 KiB  
Article
Magnetically Recoverable and Reusable Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Water Disinfection
by Monica Keeley, Kim Kisslinger, Carman Adamson and Ping Y. Furlan
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 943; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090943 - 30 Aug 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1783
Abstract
A bifunctional magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 or MS-TiO2 antimicrobial nanocomposite was prepared based on simple sol-gel methods with common equipment and chemicals. Reaction pH was found to influence the TiO2 upload in the nanocomposite. The alkaline [...] Read more.
A bifunctional magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 or MS-TiO2 antimicrobial nanocomposite was prepared based on simple sol-gel methods with common equipment and chemicals. Reaction pH was found to influence the TiO2 upload in the nanocomposite. The alkaline condition produced the greatest TiO2 upload, while the acidic condition the least. Annealing at 300 °C turned the as-synthesized amorphous TiO2 into one with high content of anatase, the most photoactive form of TiO2. Irradiated by 365 nm UV light, a sample of 30 mg/mL of annealed nanocomposite containing 12.6 wt.% Ti was shown to be able to completely eradicate 104 CFU/mL of the laboratory-grown E. coli within 25 min, 25 min faster than the control when the 365 nm UV light was employed alone. The nanocomposite demonstrated consistent antimicrobial performance over repeated uses and was easily recoverable magnetically due to its high magnetization value (33 emu/g). Additionally, it was shown to reduce the bacterial count in a real surface water sample containing 500–5000 CFU/mL of different microbes by 62 ± 3% within 30 min. The irradiating 365 nm UV light alone was found to have generated little biocidal effect on this surface water sample. The nanocomposite is promising to serve as an effective, safe, and eco-friendly antimicrobial agent, especially for surface water disinfection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials Applied in Water Treatments)
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19 pages, 5571 KiB  
Article
Tetracycline Photocatalytic Degradation under CdS Treatment
by Momoka Nagamine, Magdalena Osial, Krystyna Jackowska, Pawel Krysinski and Justyna Widera-Kalinowska
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(7), 483; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8070483 - 30 Jun 2020
Cited by 40 | Viewed by 5994
Abstract
Industrialization and the growing consumption of medicines leads to global aquatic contamination. One of the antibiotics widely used against bacterial infections in both human and veterinary medicine is tetracycline. Despite its positive antibiotic action, tetracycline is resistant against degradation, and therefore it accumulates [...] Read more.
Industrialization and the growing consumption of medicines leads to global aquatic contamination. One of the antibiotics widely used against bacterial infections in both human and veterinary medicine is tetracycline. Despite its positive antibiotic action, tetracycline is resistant against degradation, and therefore it accumulates in the environment, including the aquatic environment, creating great health hazards, possibly stimulating antibiotic resistance of pathogenic organisms. In this research, aqueous suspensions of semiconductor nanoparticles CdS were used for photocatalytic activity studies in the presence of methylene blue as a model compound, and finally, in the presence of tetracycline, a broad-spectrum antibiotic widely used against bacterial infections, as well as a live-stock food additive. The mechanism and kinetic rate constants of photocatalytic degradation processes of methylene blue and tetracycline were described in correlation with the energy diagram of CdS nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials Applied in Water Treatments)
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16 pages, 3138 KiB  
Article
Ultrasound Assisted Adsorptive Removal of Cr, Cu, Al, Ba, Zn, Ni, Mn, Co and Ti from Seawater Using Fe2O3-SiO2-PAN Nanocomposite: Equilibrium Kinetics
by Denga Ramutshatsha-Makhwedzha, Jane Catherine Ngila, Patrick G. Ndungu and Philiswa Nosizo Nomngongo
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(5), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7050133 - 09 May 2019
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2927
Abstract
This work reports the preparation and application of Fe2O3-SiO2-PAN nanocomposite for the removal of Cr3+, Cu2+, Al3+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+, Co2+ [...] Read more.
This work reports the preparation and application of Fe2O3-SiO2-PAN nanocomposite for the removal of Cr3+, Cu2+, Al3+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+, Co2+, and Ti3+ from seawater. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) characterized the synthesized composite. The following experimental parameters (Extraction time, adsorbent mass and pH) affecting the removal of major and trace metals were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The applicability of the RSM model was verified by performing the confirmation experiment using the optimal condition and the removal efficiency ranged from 90% to 97%, implying that the model was valid. The adsorption kinetic data was described by the pseudo-second order model. The applicability of the materials was tested on real seawater samples (initial concentration ranging from 0.270–203 µg L−1) and the results showed satisfactory percentage efficiency removal that range from 98% to 99.9%. The maximum adsorption capacities were found to be 4.36, 7.20, 2.23, 6.60, 5.06, 2.60, 6.79, 6.65 and 3.00 mg g−1, for Cr3+, Cu2+, Al3+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+, Co2+, and Ti4+, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials Applied in Water Treatments)
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