Nonlinear Fluid Dynamics in the Ocean

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 5425

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Marine Environment and Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Interests: nonlinear water wave theory; freak waves; wave stability; three-dimensional wave-current coupled model

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Guest Editor
UMR7342 Institut de Recherche sur les Phénomènes hors Équilibre (IRPHE), Centrale Marseille, France
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; mathematical modelling; hydrodynamics; turbulence modelling

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Guest Editor
Institut de Recherche sur les Phénomènes Hors Equilibre, Marseille, France
Interests: fluid mechanics; computational fluid mechanics; flow instability; vortex; magnetic properties; magnetization

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Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
Interests: applied mathematics; differential equations; fluid dynamics; physical oceanography; climate science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Understanding and predicting extreme events and their mechanisms in complex nonlinear system is a great challenge in ocean science and engineering. The complexity and variety of nonlinear ocean dynamic phenomena require innovative tools from many research areas, ranging from physical approaches to mathematical considerations. The mathematical analysis of nonlinear motion presents difficulties because the underlying equations are nonlinear, for which there is far less mathematical understanding than small power linear waves.

For this Special Issue, we invite papers which present theoretical/mathematical, experimental, or numerical work related to nonlinear fluid dynamic mechanics in the ocean. This Special Issue is dedicated to various manifestations of the nonlinear behavior of ocean water waves of several different types, such as surface water waves, rogue waves in the ocean, tsunamis, internal waves, and ship waves. However, details and new outcomes related to physical oceanography and coastal and ocean dynamics are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Hung-Chu Hsu
Prof.Dr. Christian Kharif
Prof.Dr. Malek Abid
Prof.Dr. Vera Hur
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • nonlinear water wave theory
  • freak waves
  • wave stability
  • three-dimensional wave-current coupled model
  • computational fluid dynamics
  • turbulence modelling
  • mathematical modelling
  • computational fluid mechanics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2509 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Sea Surface Drag Coefficient and Wave State
by Jian Shi, Zhihao Feng, Yuan Sun, Xueyan Zhang, Wenjing Zhang and Yi Yu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(11), 1248; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9111248 - 10 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2689
Abstract
The sea surface drag coefficient plays an important role in momentum transmission between the atmosphere and the ocean, which is affected by ocean waves. The total air–sea momentum flux consists of effective momentum flux and sea spray momentum flux. Sea spray momentum flux [...] Read more.
The sea surface drag coefficient plays an important role in momentum transmission between the atmosphere and the ocean, which is affected by ocean waves. The total air–sea momentum flux consists of effective momentum flux and sea spray momentum flux. Sea spray momentum flux involves sea surface drag, which is largely affected by the ocean wave state. Under strong winds, the sea surface drag coefficient (CD) does not increase linearly with the increasing wind speed, namely, the increase of CD is inhibited by strong winds. In this study, a sea surface drag coefficient is constructed that can be applied to the calculation of the air–sea momentum flux under high wind speed. The sea surface drag coefficient also considers the influence of wave state and sea spray droplets generated by wave breaking. Specially, the wave-dependent sea spray generation function is employed to calculate sea spray momentum flux. This facilitates the analysis not only on the sensitivity of the sea spray momentum flux to wave age, but also on the effect of wave state on the effective CD (CD, eff) under strong winds. Our results indicate that wave age plays an important role in determining CD. When the wave age is >0.4, CD decreases with the wave age. However, when the wave age is ≤0.4, CD increases with the wave age at low and moderate wind speeds but tends to decrease with the wave age at high wind speeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear Fluid Dynamics in the Ocean)
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19 pages, 109098 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Wave-Induced Stokes Transport Effects on Sea Surface Temperature Simulations in the Western Pacific Ocean
by Zhanfeng Sun, Weizeng Shao, Weili Wang, Wei Zhou, Wupeng Yu and Wei Shen
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(8), 834; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9080834 - 31 Jul 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2040
Abstract
This study investigated the performance of two ocean wave models, that is, Simulation Wave Nearshore (SWAN) and WAVEWATCH-III (WW3), and the interannual and seasonal variability of transport induced by Stokes drift during the period from 1989 to 2019. Three types of sea surface [...] Read more.
This study investigated the performance of two ocean wave models, that is, Simulation Wave Nearshore (SWAN) and WAVEWATCH-III (WW3), and the interannual and seasonal variability of transport induced by Stokes drift during the period from 1989 to 2019. Three types of sea surface wind products were used for wave simulation: the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim, the Cross Calibrated Multi-Platform Version 2.0 (CCMP V2.0) from Remote Sensing Systems (RSS), and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecast System (GFS). The modeling was validated against wave measurements from the Jason-2 altimeter in 2015. The analysis found that the root mean square error (RMSE) of significant wave height (SWH) from the WW3 model using CCMP wind data was 0.17 m, which is less than the ~0.6-m RMSE of SWH from the SWAN model using the other types of wind data. The simulations from the WW3 model using CCMP wind data indicated that the Stokes transport is up to 2 m2/s higher in the South China Sea and Japan Sea than that at other ocean regions in January. The interannual variation showed that the Stokes transport generally increased from 0.25 m2/s in 1989 to 0.35 m2/s in 2018. We also found that the accuracy of the sea surface temperature (SST) simulation using the Stony Brook Parallel Ocean Model (sbPOM) is improved by as much as 0.5 °C when Stokes transport is considered to validate the sbPOM-simulated SST against the measurements from Argo in 2012–2015. In particular, the Stokes transport has a negative effect on Summer (March to June) and has a positive effect in Autumn (July to September), which is probably caused by the tropical cyclones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear Fluid Dynamics in the Ocean)
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