Aquaculture: Ensure Sustainable Use and Foster Innovation for Future Climate Challenges

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2023) | Viewed by 8009

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Guest Editor
Physics Department, CESAM, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: climate change; coastal oceanography; coastal estuarine dynamics; aquaculture; numerical modelling; marine pollution
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aquaculture is one of the fastest growing activities worldwide and its distribution can be very sensitive to changes in water properties; therefore, it is essential to provide a brief overview of the potential impacts and details of ongoing and adaptation activities. The extent of the impacts of climate change in the aquaculture sector, such as extreme events, will largely be determined by the sector’s ability to develop and implement mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction, and early warming strategies, as well as the practice of a sustainable use of the natural resources.

This Special Issue will gather and share new results, best practices, successes, lessons learned, and general insights that contribute to the sustainable use of aquaculture activities, as well as ensuring the capability and viability of aquaculture activities for effective climate change related planning and management. Research articles, review articles, and case studies are welcome. Contributions should focus on aquaculture adaptation and mitigation measures, identification of the preferential sites to ensure aquaculture expansion and proper operation in a sustainable manner and with minimal environmental impact under optimal hydrodynamic and water quality conditions, planning and management of aquaculture approaches, present and projected climate-driven variations in water properties, and climate change effects on the aquaculture production of the main fertile regions.

Dr. Magda Catarina Sousa
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Sustainable aquaculture
  • Risk assessment
  • Adaptation and mitigation
  • Climate change scenarios
  • Aquaculture exploitation
  • Extreme events

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 5233 KiB  
Article
Ria de Alvor Suitability for Aquaculture: Future Challenges
by Ana Picado, Humberto Pereira, Magda C. Sousa and João Miguel Dias
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(5), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11051009 - 8 May 2023
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Abstract
A large number of estuarine systems provide favorable conditions for aquaculture, including high nutrient content, sheltered waters, and favorable water temperatures. In this context, the main objective of this work is to identify the most suitable areas within the Ria de Alvor for [...] Read more.
A large number of estuarine systems provide favorable conditions for aquaculture, including high nutrient content, sheltered waters, and favorable water temperatures. In this context, the main objective of this work is to identify the most suitable areas within the Ria de Alvor for bivalve and fish aquaculture production considering present and future conditions in a climate change context. A suitability index was developed based on the results of an annual simulation with the Delft3D model and the thresholds and optimal values of development of each species were analyzed. Generally, results suggest that the most suitable areas for aquaculture were located along the axis of the lagoon’s main channel, although seasonal variability was presented depending on the species. During winter and autumn, bivalves (oysters and mussels) are more susceptible to environmental conditions than fish. Conversely, spring presents the most favorable environmental conditions for the production of all species considered. Future projections indicate a general decrease in aquaculture suitability, particularly during winter for both bivalve species and during summer for Mussels, mostly due to the predicted increase in water temperature. Full article
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14 pages, 907 KiB  
Article
The Feasibility of Monoculture and Polyculture of Striped Catfish and Nile Tilapia in Different Proportions and Their Effects on Growth Performance, Productivity, and Financial Revenue
by Abdallah Tageldein Mansour, Belal Wagih Allam, Tarek Mohamed Srour, Eglal Ali Omar, Abdel Aziz Mousa Nour and Hala Saber Khalil
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(6), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9060586 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 3990
Abstract
Cultivation of species of high growth rates is a key achievement of sustainable aquaculture development, with the aim of increasing animal protein per capita, maintaining food security and preserving freshwater usage. The present study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of monoculture and [...] Read more.
Cultivation of species of high growth rates is a key achievement of sustainable aquaculture development, with the aim of increasing animal protein per capita, maintaining food security and preserving freshwater usage. The present study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of monoculture and polyculture of striped catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, and Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, in different proportions and their effect on growth performance, survival, productivity, feed utilization, body composition, and financial revenue. Five experimental treatments were designed as follows: monoculture of striped catfish (100%), Nile tilapia (100%) and polyculture in different proportions of striped catfish and Nile tilapia (25%:75%; 50%:50%; 75%:25%, respectively), each in three replicates. The fish feeding regime consisted of isonitrogenous (307.80 g kg−1) and isocaloric (19.27 kJ g−1) diets for 14 weeks. The results revealed that the highest growth performance, feed utilization, survival of striped catfish were obtained in monoculture, followed by polyculture of striped catfish and Nile tilapia (in low proportions) (75%:25%). The total production per m3 reached 5.41 kg m−3 in the monoculture of striped catfish, this production decreased in polyculture by 52%, 46% and 23% with 25%; 50%; 75% of striped catfish. The gross margin significantly increased, in case of striped catfish farmed in monoculture, compared to other polyculture proportions. While the gross margin per m−3 of water was 6, 0.5, 1 and 3 $ in monoculture and different polyculture proportions, respectively. Moreover, the feed cost per kilogram of protein gain significantly decreased in the monoculture of striped catfish compared to other polyculture treatments. The growth performance and survival of tilapia showed no significant difference among different treatments. In addition, the proximate chemical composition did not differ in respect to species in different studied treatments. Monoculture of striped catfish is recommended to achieve high production and improve financial revenue per water unit (m−3), for better sustainable development of aquaculture. Full article
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