Stability and Health Monitoring of Offshore Structures

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1535

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute for Ocean Engineering, Tsinghua Shenzhen International Graduate School, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: subsea engineering; fatigue and fracture of materials and structures; stability of shell structures, random vibration and control; sea ice engineering; risk and reliability in offshore and ocean engineering
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Offshore structures include, but are not limited to, marine infrastructure at the surface and bottom of the sea, as well as equipment for marine transport or observation. Due to the nonlinear marine environmental system, the marine structure will produce complex responses to different types of loads such as wind, wave, current and seabed substrate. Risk analysis, stability and structural health monitoring are integrated throughout the design, installation and maintenance of offshore structures.

This Special Issue aims to collect the latest research progress and application examples concerning the safety analysis, material optimization, environmental load analysis, damage and fracture identification, detection techniques and methods, finite element analysis models, etc.

We invite you to publish your high-quality research and development work in the Special Issue on “Stability and Health Monitoring of Offshore Structures”. All types of manuscripts (i.e., research articles, reviews, and short communications) are welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Menglan Duan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fatigue
  • welding
  • fracture
  • structure corrosion and degradation
  • material optimization
  • marine structure design modeling
  • monitoring method
  • machine learning methods and data processing
  • finite element analysis
  • safety risk assessment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 2809 KiB  
Article
Effects of Laying Depth and Pipe Arc Length on the Mechanical Performance of Large-Diameter Cold-Water Pipes during Float-and-Sink Installation
by Dongshi Wang, Miaozi Zheng, Li Zhang, Zhenyu Mao, Jian Tan, Yulong Zhang and Menglan Duan
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(8), 1520; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11081520 - 30 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1031
Abstract
The successful operation of a large-diameter cold water pipeline installation is crucial for harnessing the potential of ocean thermal energy conversion. However, there is a shortage of research focused on mechanical performance analysis during installation. This study establishes a pipeline response analysis model [...] Read more.
The successful operation of a large-diameter cold water pipeline installation is crucial for harnessing the potential of ocean thermal energy conversion. However, there is a shortage of research focused on mechanical performance analysis during installation. This study establishes a pipeline response analysis model based on a nonlinear beam theory to elucidate the underlying mechanical behaviour. Employing the method of singular perturbation, the general solution for the exterior region of the pipeline, the solution at the boundary layer, and the valid solution across the entire domain are derived. A comparison with numerical solutions is conducted to validate the accuracy and effectiveness of the theoretical model. Based on the theoretical analysis, the influence of installation depth and pipeline curvature on the pipeline’s shape, tension, curvature, and stress is discussed. The results indicate that increasing the installation depth leads to intensified pipeline bending and significant deformation, reaching a maximum bending moment of 3.92 MN∙m at a distance of 50~100 m from the bottom of the pipeline. The results also show that, as the pipeline’s arc length increases from 0 to 100 m, the bending curvature, Von Mises stress, and bending stress exhibit a trend of initial growth followed by a decline, peaking at 7.45 MPa, and 6.83 Mpa, respectively, while the actual tension and axial tension decrease initially and then increase, reaching −0.17 MN and −0.17 MPa, respectively, at the maximum arc length. The findings of this study provide valuable insights for practical cold-water pipe installation and laying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stability and Health Monitoring of Offshore Structures)
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