Special Issue "Image-Guided Medical Robotics"

A special issue of Journal of Imaging (ISSN 2313-433X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Zion Tse

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: image-guided therapies; computed assisted surgeries; precutanous procedures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Image-guided medical robotics has been significantly advanced with the help of robotic technologies, as can be witnessed from numerous industrial and research outcomes. Various robotic platforms have been proposed and developed to further reduce the invasiveness of robot-assisted surgery, accelerate recovery, improve patient quality of life, and increase accuracy and precision of cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, there are still challenges to implementing robotic technology in image-guided therapies, such as the design of workflow, control, sensors, actuators, and materials for specific clinical applications.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to present papers addressing state-of-the-art research achievements and advances in image-guided interventional software and hardware technologies, and to discuss potential challenges from the clinical point of view. Particularly, emphasis is being placed on researching and developing medical robots that address clinical pain points, and successfully translate from benchtop to bedside, making real impact in hospital settings.

Assoc. Prof. Zion Tse
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Imaging is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • MR-, CT, Cone Beam CT, Ultrasound-guided needle insertion devices
  • MRI compatible surgical robotic systems
  • Image processing for needle and tissue visualization
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning applications in image-guided therapies and image-based diagnosis
  • Augment reality, mixed reality and smartphone applications in image-guided therapies and image-based diagnosis
  • Robotics-assisted needle steering
  • Robotic endoscope and catheter, medical image processing
  • Actuators and sensors for needle deflection measurement
  • Design of workflow, control, sensors, actuators, and materials for specific clinical applications
  • Path planning and feedback control for needle steering
  • Needle modelling, tissue modelling and needle-tissue interaction modelling
  • Modelling, design, and fabrication of steerable needles
  • Steering of continuum-style robots for minimally-invasive surgery
  • Clinical translation issues

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Magnetic Resonance Conditional Microinjector
J. Imaging 2019, 5(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging5010004
Received: 17 September 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 20 December 2018 / Published: 30 December 2018
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Abstract
Glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness, has been linked to increases in intraocular pressure. In order to observe and study this effect, proposed is a specialized microinjector and driver that can be used to inject small amounts of liquid into a
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Glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness, has been linked to increases in intraocular pressure. In order to observe and study this effect, proposed is a specialized microinjector and driver that can be used to inject small amounts of liquid into a target volume. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided remotely activated devices require specialized equipment that is compatible with the MR environment. This paper presents an MR Conditional microinjector system with a pressure sensor for investigating the effects of intraocular pressure (IOP) in near-real-time. The system uses pressurized air and a linear actuation device to push a syringe in a controlled, stepwise manner. The feasibility and utility of the proposed investigative medical research tool were tested and validated by measuring the pressure inside an intact animal donor eyeball while precise, small volumes of water were injected into the specimen. Observable increases in the volume of the specimen at measured, specific target pressure increases show that the system is technically feasible for studying IOP effects, while the changes in shape were depicted in MRI scan images themselves. In addition, it was verified that the presence and operation of the system did not interfere with the MRI machine, confirming its conditional compatibility with the 3T MRI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Image-Guided Medical Robotics)
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Open AccessArticle MRI Robot for Prostate Focal Laser Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study in Human Prostate
J. Imaging 2018, 4(12), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging4120140
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 November 2018 / Published: 29 November 2018
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Abstract
Purpose: A novel grid-template-mimicking MR-compatible robot was developed for in-gantry MRI-guided focal laser ablation of prostate cancer. Method: A substantially compact robot was designed and prototyped to meet in-gantry lithotomy ergonomics and allow for accommodation in the perineum. The controller software
[...] Read more.
Purpose: A novel grid-template-mimicking MR-compatible robot was developed for in-gantry MRI-guided focal laser ablation of prostate cancer. Method: A substantially compact robot was designed and prototyped to meet in-gantry lithotomy ergonomics and allow for accommodation in the perineum. The controller software was reconfigured and integrated with the custom-designed navigation and multi-focal ablation software. Three experiments were conducted: (1) free space accuracy test; (2) phantom study under computed tomography (CT) guidance for image-guided accuracy test and overall workflow; and (3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focal laser ablation of an ex vivo prostate. The free space accuracy study included five targets that were selected across the workspace. The robot was then commanded five times to each target. The phantom study used a gel phantom made with color changing thermos-chromic ink, and four spherical metal fiducials were deployed with the robot. Then, laser ablation was applied, and the phantom was sliced for gross observation. For an MR-guided ex vivo test, a prostate from a donor who died of prostate cancer was obtained and multi-focally ablated using the system within the MRI gantry. The tissue was sliced after ablation for validation. Results: free-space accuracy was 0.38 ± 0.27 mm. The overall system targeting accuracy under CT guidance (including robot, registration, and insertion error) was 2.17 ± 0.47 mm. The planned ablation zone was successfully covered in both acrylamide gel phantom and in human prostate tissue. Conclusions: The new robot can accurately facilitate fiber targeting for MR-guided focal laser ablation of targetable prostate cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Image-Guided Medical Robotics)
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Open AccessArticle 3D Printing Endobronchial Models for Surgical Training and Simulation
J. Imaging 2018, 4(11), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging4110135
Received: 16 September 2018 / Revised: 3 November 2018 / Accepted: 14 November 2018 / Published: 16 November 2018
PDF Full-text (2191 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Many methods and devices help acquire more accurate clinical and localization information during lung interventions and may impact the death rate for lung cancer. However, there is a learning curve for operating these tools
[...] Read more.
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Many methods and devices help acquire more accurate clinical and localization information during lung interventions and may impact the death rate for lung cancer. However, there is a learning curve for operating these tools due to the complex structure of the airway. In this study, we first discuss the creation of a lung phantom model from medical images, which is followed by a comparison of 3D printing in terms of quality and consistency. Two tests were conducted to test the performance of the developed phantom, which was designed for training simulations of the target and ablation processes in endochonchial interventions. The target test was conducted through an electromagnetic tracking catheter with navigation software. An ablation catheter with a recently developed thermochromic ablation gel conducted the ablation test. The results of two tests show that the phantom was very useful for target and ablation simulation. In addition, the thermochromic gel allowed doctors to visualize the ablation zone. Many lung interventions may benefit from custom training or accuracy with the proposed low-cost and patient-specific phantom. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Image-Guided Medical Robotics)
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