Special Issue "Movement Analysis"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jan Cabri Website E-Mail
Department of Physical Performance, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway
Interests: biomechanics; musculoskeletal anatomy; movement analysis; electromyography; sport physical therapy; test methodology
Guest Editor
Dr. Luís Silva E-Mail
Laboratory of Motor Behavior, Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: sport physiology; movement analysis; electromyography; kinesiology; neuromuscular physiology; machine learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Movement analysis encompasses multiple scientific goals, including the clinical evaluation of movement disorders and the performance-related assessment of sport-specific movement patterns. Motor skill development and acquisition, movement optimization for both performance improvement, and rehabilitation purposes are the key fields of study in which the analysis of functional static and dynamic movement is of great importance. For these purposes, motor tasks, such as walking, up-right posture, jumping, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit, various sport skills, jumping and landing, and associated tasks to motor constraints performed by different populations, have been observed using 3-D kinematic motion systems, accelerometers, gyroscopes, force sensors and dynamometers, force platforms, electromyography, and computational systems of movement analysis. The advances in tracking technologies launched spatiotemporal possibilities, resulting in more accurate and reliable analysis, as well as real-time information of musculoskeletal activity and its mechanical causes. Since motor development depends on multi-dimensional interactions between the subject/patient and the environment, movement analysis models need to focus on relationships between muscular geometry and joint complexity without neglecting associated motor constraints (due to, e.g., injury). The discussion on modeling movement in the different domains and the tools that should be used to do so, continues to be a topic of interest to those who are interested human movement. Consequently, the aim of this Special Issue is to contribute with research articles that put methodologies of movement analysis in a context of motor constraints providing fundamental information to help coaches, physiotherapists, physicians, and other health professionals to prevent injury, evaluate and eventually enhance (athletic) performance and function.

Prof. Dr. Jan Cabri
Dr. Luís Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • movement analysis
  • biofeedback
  • dynamometry
  • electromyography
  • ergonomics
  • fiber optic sensors
  • functional rehabilitation
  • gait analysis
  • inertial sensors
  • instrument validation
  • kinematics
  • kinetics
  • motor function
  • sport-specific movement
  • three-dimensional computational systems
  • wearable systems
  • injury prevention

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Fatigue on Electromyographic Activity Patterns of the Knee Joint Muscles in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed and Deficient Patients during Landing Task
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3020022 - 05 Apr 2018
Abstract
Lower extremity fatigue causes a number of neuromuscular alterations that may increase the risk of knee (re)injury. It has therefore been suggested that fatigue-resistance training be incorporated into injury prevention and rehabilitation programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects [...] Read more.
Lower extremity fatigue causes a number of neuromuscular alterations that may increase the risk of knee (re)injury. It has therefore been suggested that fatigue-resistance training be incorporated into injury prevention and rehabilitation programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of fatigue on knee-muscle activity patterns after anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL). Twelve healthy, 12 ACL reconstructed (ACLR) and 12 ACL deficient (ACLD) recreationally active male volunteers participated in this case-control study. Fatigue was induced via repetitive sets of double-leg squats and drop landings. Muscle activity was assessed via surface electromyography during a single-leg drop landing task pre- and post-fatigue. After fatigue, medial hamstring, lateral hamstring and vastus lateralis muscles turned on significantly earlier in ACLR compared to the control group. Significantly greater vastus medialis muscle activity was observed in ACLD compared to ACLR and control participants post-fatigue. Finally, fatigue decreased lateral gastrocnemius muscle activity in ACLD and control participants. It seems ACLR patients rely on earlier muscle pre-activation to establish knee joint stability upon landing after fatigue. This feed-forward strategy should be emphasized during post-operative rehabilitation in ACLR patients. Furthermore, according to our results, quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles play an important role in establishing knee joint stability post impact in ACLD patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Movement Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Body Position on Pelvic Tilt Angles Measured with a Smartphone-Based Navigated Ultrasound System in Symptom-Free Young Adults
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3010018 - 20 Mar 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The study aimed to investigate whether pelvic tilt (PT) angles differ between the supine and upright position in symptom-free young adults. Additionally, the concurrent validity of the measurement system was tested on a pelvis phantom against a digital inclinometer. A new smartphone-based navigated [...] Read more.
The study aimed to investigate whether pelvic tilt (PT) angles differ between the supine and upright position in symptom-free young adults. Additionally, the concurrent validity of the measurement system was tested on a pelvis phantom against a digital inclinometer. A new smartphone-based navigated ultrasound system was used to perform the measurements. The sample consisted of 12 symptom-free young adults. A multivariate regression model was used to analyze the data. The subjects’ pelvis in supine position was significantly more tilted anteriorly (mean PT = −7.3°, 95% C.I.: −10.6 to −3.9) than in upright position (mean PT = 0.8°, 95% C.I.: −2.5 to 4.1) (mean. diff. 8.1°; p < 0.001). Rater and trial order had no significant effects on the measured PT angles (p = 0.5). The accuracy of the system when measuring PT angles on the pelvis phantom was 0.3° (0.1° to 0.7°) and 0.2° (−0.09° to 0.6°) for the supine and upright positions respectively. Pelvic tilt angles differed significantly between the supine and the upright position in symptom-free young adults. Concurrent validity showed no differences for measurements in the upright position and small (under 0.4°) significant differences for measurements in the supine position. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Movement Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Postural Stability Is Affected in Older Males with Haemophilia—A Matched Control Study
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3010010 - 31 Jan 2018
Abstract
Despite fall-related injuries having serious consequences for older haemophilic patients, few studies have investigated their postural stability and risk of falls. The aim was to examine postural stability, joint function and joint mobility in haemophiliacs and age-matched controls. Centre of pressure excursions in [...] Read more.
Despite fall-related injuries having serious consequences for older haemophilic patients, few studies have investigated their postural stability and risk of falls. The aim was to examine postural stability, joint function and joint mobility in haemophiliacs and age-matched controls. Centre of pressure excursions in four 60 s balance conditions, two minute walk test, passive ankle and knee range of motion, Haemophilia Joint Health Score, and Haemophilia Early Arthropathy Detection with Ultrasound score were measured in eight men with haemophilia (people with heamophilia, PWH), and eight age-matched men without haemophilia (people without heamophilia, PWOH). PWH have significantly worse postural stability under physically perturbed conditions (p = 0.001–0.028, η p 2 = 0.19–0.34), reduced joint function (p = 0.001–0.010, d = 1.33–2.62) and mobility (p < 0.001–0.025, d = 1.01–4.61), and increased centre of pressure (CoP) velocity (p < 0.001–0.003) when compared to PWOH. Postural stability among PWH did not deteriorate with time standing, although significant decreases compared to PWOH across all time intervals were observed (Eyes Open Foam (EOF) CoP ellipse (time x group) p = 0.011, η p 2 = 0.28; path (time × group) p = 0.035, η p 2 = 0.21; EOF CoP antero-posterior (AP) (time × group) p = 0.021, η p 2 = 0.24). Joint function, mobility, and postural stability are reduced in PWH compared to PWOH, driven by differences in the CoP AP range. Dynamic tests incorporating physical perturbation may be more effective than static balance tests on a level surface, and longer period of time to assess postural stability may determine whether fatigue affects ability of PWH to maintain postural stability. Adoption of a possible ‘hip strategy’ by which to achieve balance suggests falls prevention programs need to focus on increasing hip strength and retraining ankle strategy movement to allow PWH to improve balance stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Movement Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Reliability and Validity of the Hand Reach Star Excursion Balance Test
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2017, 2(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk2030028 - 04 Aug 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Measuring dynamic postural control and mobility using task-based full-body movements has been advocated. The star excursion balance test (SEBT) is well-established, but it does not elicit large upper body joint movements. Therefore, the hand reach star excursion balance test (HSEBT) was developed. The [...] Read more.
Measuring dynamic postural control and mobility using task-based full-body movements has been advocated. The star excursion balance test (SEBT) is well-established, but it does not elicit large upper body joint movements. Therefore, the hand reach star excursion balance test (HSEBT) was developed. The purpose of the current study was to assess the inter-rater and test-retest reliability and validity of the HSEBT. Twenty-nine healthy male subjects performed ten HSEBT reaches on each leg on four different occasions, led by three different raters. Reach distances were recorded in centimeters and degrees. Then, twenty-eight different healthy males performed the HSEBT while using a standard motion capture system. Reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (range 0.77–0.98). Stability of measurement was assessed using the standard error of measurement (SEM) (range 0.3–2.8 cm and 1.7°–2.6°) and coefficient of variation (CV) (range 2.1–14.6%). Change scores were obtained using minimal detectable change (MDC95) (range 0.9–7.9 cm and 4.7°–7.2°). Observed (Maxm) and calculated (Maxkin) maximum hand reach measurements showed good to excellent correlations. Bland Altman analysis established a fixed bias for all tests, which can be partially explained by the kinematic calculations. In conclusion, the HSEBT is a valid and reliable full-body clinical tool for measuring dynamic postural control and functional joint mobility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Movement Analysis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
What Is the Evidence on Which Physicians Can Rely to Advise Patients When They May Resume Driving after TKA? A Systematic Literature Review
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3010008 - 19 Jan 2018
Abstract
Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) often ask when they can safely resume driving. Answering this question is an important matter, which might entail legal and insurance issues. In the present review, the following questions are addressed: What is the quality of the [...] Read more.
Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) often ask when they can safely resume driving. Answering this question is an important matter, which might entail legal and insurance issues. In the present review, the following questions are addressed: What is the quality of the existing literature on this issue? When does the Brake Response Time (BRT) return to baseline values after right and left TKA? Are BRT components, reaction time (RT), and movement time (MT) equally affected after right and left TKA? Are there gender differences regarding the influence of TKA on BRT and its recovery? An electronic systematic search was performed on Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Science, and PubMed. Ten studies investigating the effects of TKA on driving performance were included. The quality assessment was made with a 12-item assessment tool adapted from the “Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies” of the National Institute of Health. The quality of the existing studies varies, with all studies having methodological weak points. TKA causes an MT delay, which affects BRT negatively. The mean number of days for BRT to return to baseline values was 44 ± 19 (95% C.I. [29 to 58]) and 20 ± 15 (95% C.I. [2 to 38]) after right and left TKA, respectively. As shown by the wide 95% C.I. of the mean, these values can increase to higher numbers. Based on the weighted mean values, a driving abstinence of at least six weeks after right TKA and three weeks after left TKA should be recommended. Due to the discrepancies found in results, further high quality studies are necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Movement Analysis)
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