Special Issue "Retinoids in Development 2019"

A special issue of Journal of Developmental Biology (ISSN 2221-3759).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stephane Zaffran
Website
Guest Editor
Aix Marseille University, INSERM, Marseille Medical Genetics, U1251, 13005 Marseille, France
Interests: developmental biology; cardiac and cardiovascular systems; pathology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sonia Stefanovic
Website
Guest Editor
Aix Marseille Université, INSERM U1251, MMG, Marseille, France

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It has been more than 60 years since retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, was recognized as a key regulator of organogenesis and homeostasis. Retinoic-acid signalling has been studied in a wide range of species including amphibians, zebrafish, chicks, and rodents. These studies have demonstrated the important role of retinoids in embryonic patterning and homeostasis during development, as well as their crucial role in vision, the immune system, and tissue homeostasis in adults. The use of various animal models and experimental tools has been successful in deciphering retinoid functions at the cellular and molecular levels. Despite intense studies on the role of RA signalling during development, important questions remain on how retinoids might modulate stem-cell dynamics at the adult stage. This Special Issue of the Journal of Developmental Biology will provide an overview of the current understanding of the role of retinoic acid during development and regeneration. Contributions can be reviews, as well as research papers, covering topics of retinoic-acid signalling during embryonic development.

Dr. Stephane Zaffran
Dr. Sonia Stefanovic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Developmental Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • retinoic acid
  • retinoid receptors
  • development
  • evolution
  • cell-fate decision
  • stem cell
  • gene expression

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Regulating Retinoic Acid Availability during Development and Regeneration: The Role of the CYP26 Enzymes
J. Dev. Biol. 2020, 8(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/jdb8010006 - 05 Mar 2020
Abstract
This review focuses on the role of the Cytochrome p450 subfamily 26 (CYP26) retinoic acid (RA) degrading enzymes during development and regeneration. Cyp26 enzymes, along with retinoic acid synthesising enzymes, are absolutely required for RA homeostasis in these processes by regulating availability of [...] Read more.
This review focuses on the role of the Cytochrome p450 subfamily 26 (CYP26) retinoic acid (RA) degrading enzymes during development and regeneration. Cyp26 enzymes, along with retinoic acid synthesising enzymes, are absolutely required for RA homeostasis in these processes by regulating availability of RA for receptor binding and signalling. Cyp26 enzymes are necessary to generate RA gradients and to protect specific tissues from RA signalling. Disruption of RA homeostasis leads to a wide variety of embryonic defects affecting many tissues. Here, the function of CYP26 enzymes is discussed in the context of the RA signalling pathway, enzymatic structure and biochemistry, human genetic disease, and function in development and regeneration as elucidated from animal model studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Retinoids in Development 2019)
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Open AccessReview
Reiterative Mechanisms of Retinoic Acid Signaling during Vertebrate Heart Development
J. Dev. Biol. 2019, 7(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/jdb7020011 - 30 May 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Tightly-regulated levels of retinoic acid (RA) are critical for promoting normal vertebrate development. The extensive history of research on RA has shown that its proper regulation is essential for cardiac progenitor specification and organogenesis. Here, we discuss the roles of RA signaling and [...] Read more.
Tightly-regulated levels of retinoic acid (RA) are critical for promoting normal vertebrate development. The extensive history of research on RA has shown that its proper regulation is essential for cardiac progenitor specification and organogenesis. Here, we discuss the roles of RA signaling and its establishment of networks that drive both early and later steps of normal vertebrate heart development. We focus on studies that highlight the drastic effects alternative levels of RA have on early cardiomyocyte (CM) specification and cardiac chamber morphogenesis, consequences of improper RA synthesis and degradation, and known effectors downstream of RA. We conclude with the implications of these findings to our understanding of cardiac regeneration and the etiologies of congenital heart defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Retinoids in Development 2019)
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Open AccessReview
Retinoids in Stellate Cells: Development, Repair, and Regeneration
J. Dev. Biol. 2019, 7(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/jdb7020010 - 24 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Stellate cells, either hepatic (HSCs) or pancreatic (PSCs), are a type of interstitial cells characterized by their ability to store retinoids in lipid vesicles. In pathological conditions both HSCs and PSCs lose their retinoid content and transform into fibroblast-like cells, contributing to the [...] Read more.
Stellate cells, either hepatic (HSCs) or pancreatic (PSCs), are a type of interstitial cells characterized by their ability to store retinoids in lipid vesicles. In pathological conditions both HSCs and PSCs lose their retinoid content and transform into fibroblast-like cells, contributing to the fibrogenic response. HSCs also participate in other functions including vasoregulation, drug detoxification, immunotolerance, and maintenance of the hepatocyte population. PSCs maintain pancreatic tissue architecture and regulate pancreatic exocrine function. Recently, PSCs have attracted the attention of researchers due to their interactions with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. PSCs promote tumour growth and angiogenesis, and their fibrotic activity increases the resistance of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy and radiation. We are reviewing the current literature concerning the role played by retinoids in the physiology and pathophysiology of the stellate cells, paying attention to their developmental aspects as well as the function of stellate cells in tissue repair and organ regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Retinoids in Development 2019)
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