Special Issue "Current Research and Development in Composite Materials"

A special issue of Journal of Composites Science (ISSN 2504-477X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kheng-Lim Goh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Newcastle University, Singapore 599493, Singapore
Interests: physical properties of natural and synthetic materials; engineer composite materials; repair damaged composite materials
Dr. Mohd Shahir Bin Kasim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka, Malaysia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Composite materials play an important role in the development of modern science and technology. The depth and breadth of the advantages of composite materials and the speed and scale of their production development and wide applicability have captured the attention of many industries that seek to exploit composite materials for their intended purposes, e.g., light-weight and strong carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites for aerospace, automotive, and marine structures, green fiber reinforced plastics for fabricating house-hold products and construction industry. Clearly, the choice of composite materials in the desired application is one of the important signs to measure the advancement of the science and technology of the relevant industry.  
This Special Issue is dedicated to publishing papers (e.g., review, experimental, theoretical, computational) in all fields related to composite materials that address recent advances in the research and development of the materials. The key focus are on fiber reinforced composite materials and particle reinforced composite materials, addressing, not only just the usual topics on structural/mechanical properties, but also more novel areas such as intelligent materials, sensing (e.g., structural health monitoring) applications, extreme environment applications, and sustainability areas, such as recyclability and repair strategies, etc.

Prof. Kheng-Lim Goh
Dr. Mohd Shahir Bin Kasim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Composites Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Advanced composite materials
  • Intelligent Materials
  • structural, mechanical, and properties
  • theoretical studies (modeling and simulation)
  • applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Thermal Analysis of Blended Nanoaluminum/Fluorinated Polyether-Segmented Urethane Composites
J. Compos. Sci. 2019, 3(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs3010025 - 07 Mar 2019
Abstract
The thermally induced reaction of aluminum fuel and a fluoropolymer oxidizer such as polytetrafluoroethylene (via C-F activation) has been a well-studied thermite event for slow-burning pyrolants among a multitude of energetic applications. Generally, most metallized thermoplastic fluoropolymers suffer from manufacturing limitations using common [...] Read more.
The thermally induced reaction of aluminum fuel and a fluoropolymer oxidizer such as polytetrafluoroethylene (via C-F activation) has been a well-studied thermite event for slow-burning pyrolants among a multitude of energetic applications. Generally, most metallized thermoplastic fluoropolymers suffer from manufacturing limitations using common melt or solvent processing techniques due to the inherent low surface energy and high crystallinity of fluoropolymers. In this report, we prepared an energetic composite utilizing the versatility of urethane-based polymers and provide a comparative thermal characterization study. Specifically, a thermite formulation comprising of nanometer-sized aluminum (nAl) fuel coated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oxidizer was solvent-blended with either a polyethylene glycol (PEG) or PFPE-segmented urethane copolymer. Thermal data were collected with calorimetric and thermogravimetric techniques to determine glass transition temperature and decomposition temperature, which showed modest effects upon various loadings of PFPE-coated nAl in the urethane matrix. While our application focus was for energetics, this study also demonstrates the potential to expand the ability to broadly manufacture structural metallized composites to their consideration as coatings, foams, or fibers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research and Development in Composite Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Anticorrosion Properties of Epoxy Composite Coating Reinforced by Molybdate-Intercalated Functionalized Layered Double Hydroxide
J. Compos. Sci. 2019, 3(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs3010011 - 15 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Herein, an intercalation modification technique is proposed to improve the anticorrosion performance of polymeric coatings. Molybdate, an inhibitor, was intercalated to bestow inhibitive attributes, while functionalization of the layered double hydroxide (LDH) reservoir was performed to augment the interfacial adhesion of LDH with [...] Read more.
Herein, an intercalation modification technique is proposed to improve the anticorrosion performance of polymeric coatings. Molybdate, an inhibitor, was intercalated to bestow inhibitive attributes, while functionalization of the layered double hydroxide (LDH) reservoir was performed to augment the interfacial adhesion of LDH with the polymer matrix and steel surfaces. The intercalation and functionalization of Mg–Al–LDH was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the prepared composite coating was analyzed using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The electrochemical results revealed that the protective performance of epoxy coating was significantly enhanced by the addition of functionalized double hydroxide. The corrosion protection efficiency of the composite coating was improved by more than 98%, while the corrosion rate was lowered by ~98%, respectively, with the addition of 1 wt.% of functionalized LDH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research and Development in Composite Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Bio-Composites Reinforced with Strontium Titanate Nanoparticles: Mechanical Behavior and Degradability
J. Compos. Sci. 2019, 3(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs3010007 - 09 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Bio-polymer-based composites are appealing cost-effective and environmentally friendly materials for electronic applications. This project relates to bio-composites made of chitosan and cellulose and reinforced with strontium titanate nanoparticles. Upon their fabrication, relevant parameters studied were the acetic acid concentration, the cellulose content, and [...] Read more.
Bio-polymer-based composites are appealing cost-effective and environmentally friendly materials for electronic applications. This project relates to bio-composites made of chitosan and cellulose and reinforced with strontium titanate nanoparticles. Upon their fabrication, relevant parameters studied were the acetic acid concentration, the cellulose content, and the amount of strontium titanate nanoparticles. The specimens were characterized using thermogravimetric and degradation analyses, as well as via creep and tensile tests. The results revealed how higher cellulose levels lowered the ultimate tensile strength and the degradation temperature of the bio-composites. Moreover, when nanoparticles are present, higher cellulose levels contributed to their tensile strength. Additionally, more acidic solutions became detrimental to the mechanical properties and the thermal degradation temperature of the composites. Furthermore, the creep studies allowed determining elastic coefficients and viscous coefficients using the Burgers’ model. Those creep results suggest that higher amounts of SrTiO3 (STO) nanoparticles raised the composites creep strain rate. As a whole, the study provides a baseline characterization of these novel bio-composites when subject to aggressive environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research and Development in Composite Materials)
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