Special Issue "Ecology and Pest Management of Sugarcane Insects"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Thomas E. Reagan

Department of Entomology, Louisiana State University, 474 Life Sciences Bldg., Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ecology and pest management of sugarcane insects
Guest Editor
Dr. Des Conlong

South African Sugarcane Research Institute, Mount Edgecombe, South Africa
Website | E-Mail
Interests: minimal growth of sugarcane in vitro; direct and indirect morphogenesis of sugarcane in vitro, in semi-solid media and temporary immersion RITA® bioreactors; rooting and acclimatisation of tissue culture-derived plantlets.

Special Issue Information

Most evolutionary ecologists believe that sugarcane first evolved in Papua New Guinea, probably near the Ramu river valley and on adjacent mountains where several component grass species occur today at different clines. Sugarcane entomological scientists write this issue from many different sugarcane countries, Australia, South Africa, Ecuador, Madagascar, Thailand, the U.S, and others. Because sugarcane is a monocot crop that grows differently in some places, different cultivars are quite often unique by area. Also, the use of certain insecticides is often exclusive to the United States. The purpose of this issue usually is to explain how we preserve biological control in countries outside of the United States of America.

Prof. Dr. Thomas E. Reagan
Dr. Des Conlong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
First Screening of Entomopathogenic Nematodes and Fungus as Biocontrol Agents against an Emerging Pest of Sugarcane, Cacosceles newmannii (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)
Insects 2019, 10(4), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10040117
Received: 14 March 2019 / Revised: 8 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 25 April 2019
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Abstract
Cacosceles newmannii (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is an emerging pest of sugarcane in South Africa. The larvae of this cerambycid beetle live within the sugarcane stalk and drill galleries that considerably reduce sugar production. To provide an alternative to chemical control, entomopathogenic nematodes and fungus [...] Read more.
Cacosceles newmannii (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is an emerging pest of sugarcane in South Africa. The larvae of this cerambycid beetle live within the sugarcane stalk and drill galleries that considerably reduce sugar production. To provide an alternative to chemical control, entomopathogenic nematodes and fungus were investigated as potential biological control agents to be used in an integrated pest management system. The nematodes Steinernema yirgalemense, S. jeffreyense, Heterorhabditis indica, and different concentrations of the fungus Metarhizium pinghaense were screened for efficacy (i.e., mortality rate) against larvae of C. newmannii. The different biocontrol agents used, revealed a low level of pathogenicity to C. newmannii larvae, when compared to control treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Pest Management of Sugarcane Insects)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Mexican Rice Borer Control Tactics in United States Sugarcane
Insects 2019, 10(6), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10060160
Received: 1 March 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 3 June 2019 / Published: 5 June 2019
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Abstract
The invasive Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar), expanded its range from Mexico to South Texas in the early 1980s. By 2008 the pest had moved into sugarcane- and rice-growing areas of East Texas and Louisiana, and by 2012 it was reported on [...] Read more.
The invasive Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar), expanded its range from Mexico to South Texas in the early 1980s. By 2008 the pest had moved into sugarcane- and rice-growing areas of East Texas and Louisiana, and by 2012 it was reported on noncrop host plants in Florida. Efforts to suppress E. loftini in United States sugarcane with chemicals and biological control agents were unsuccessful, so both tactics were discontinued, and E. loftini infestation of sugarcane has continued unchecked. During the last 15 years, however, research has focused on the pest’s ecology, improved insecticides and scouting methods, the identification of sugarcane resistance mechanisms, and new cultural tactics. A surveillance technique was developed that indicates when larvae are most vulnerable to insecticide sprays. Currently, registered insecticides for E. loftini control are not widely applied, although some show promise, including an insect growth regulator. A number of potentially useful cultural practices are available, including plowing under fallow stubble, judicious use of fertilizer, adequate irrigation, avoiding proximity to E. loftini-susceptible maize cultivars, and enhancement of natural enemy populations. Demonstrated and potentially useful sugarcane resistance mechanisms involve physiochemical attributes, physical characteristics, and transgenic cultivars. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Pest Management of Sugarcane Insects)
Open AccessReview
Hemipteran Pests of Sugarcane in North America
Insects 2019, 10(4), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10040107
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 14 April 2019
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Abstract
Piercing-sucking herbivores (Insecta: Hemiptera) represent one of the greatest threats to agricultural production worldwide. Hemipteran pests directly injure plants as well as vector disease-causing plant pathogens. Production of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) in North America is impacted by a complex of Hemiptera including [...] Read more.
Piercing-sucking herbivores (Insecta: Hemiptera) represent one of the greatest threats to agricultural production worldwide. Hemipteran pests directly injure plants as well as vector disease-causing plant pathogens. Production of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) in North America is impacted by a complex of Hemiptera including the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari Zehntner (Aphididae); yellow sugarcane aphid, Sipha flava (Forbes) (Aphididae); West Indian canefly, Saccharosydne saccharivora (Westwood) (Delphacidae); sugarcane delphacid, Perkinsiella saccharicida Kirkaldy (Delphacidae); and sugarcane lace bug, Leptodictya tabida (Herric-Schaeffer) (Tingidae). None of these pests is consistently damaging to large amounts of sugarcane acreage, but regional outbreaks are common. The biology, ecology, and pest management of these insects are discussed with emphasis on North America sugarcane production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Pest Management of Sugarcane Insects)
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