Special Issue "Occupational Health and Obesity"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Katie M. Heinrich
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Kinesiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Interests: obesity prevention and treatment; high intensity functional training; applied exercise interventions and chronic disease; active transportation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity proposes a significant threat to occupational health. Employed adults spend 25% of their lives at work, and work-related pressures and obligations impact eating habits and activity patterns. Living with obesity can disproportionately impact opportunities to work as well as productivity within occupational settings. The direction of the relationship between obesity and occupational conditions and exposures is unclear, but the co-morbidities associated with obesity have a clear negative workforce impact. As a result, obesity has been linked to higher direct and indirect medical costs.
Despite national and international efforts to prevent and treat obesity, rates continue to increase worldwide. The purpose of this Special Issue is to explore efforts to address obesity among different occupations. Occupations of interest include tactical athletes (e.g., military, law enforcement, and first responders), office workers, and blue collar workers, among others. Topics of interest include improving obesity measurement and diagnosis, innovative prevention programs that address multiple health behaviors, and treatment programs that are operated through the worksite. High quality original research articles, PRISMA-framed reviews of progress in the field, and case reports are welcome. All manuscripts will be reviewed by experts in the field.

Prof. Dr. Katie M. Heinrich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Body mass index
  • Emergency responders
  • Exercise
  • Firefighters
  • Health promotion
  • Law enforcement
  • Military personnel
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Occupational diseases
  • Occupational health
  • Physical activity
  • Quality of life
  • Sedentary behavior
  • Shift work schedule
  • Work
  • Workplace

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Despite Low Obesity Rates, Body Mass Index Under-Estimated Obesity among Russian Police Officers When Compared to Body Fat Percentage
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 1937; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061937 - 16 Mar 2020
Abstract
In some countries, obesity rates among police officers are higher than the general public, despite physically demanding jobs. Obesity rates based on body mass index (BMI) may lack accuracy as BMI does not directly address body composition. Since data are lacking for obesity [...] Read more.
In some countries, obesity rates among police officers are higher than the general public, despite physically demanding jobs. Obesity rates based on body mass index (BMI) may lack accuracy as BMI does not directly address body composition. Since data are lacking for obesity rates among Russian police officers, this study documented and compared officer obesity rates to the adult Russian population and compared the accuracy of body mass index (BMI) for obesity classification to two direct measures of body composition. Moscow region police officers (N = 182, 84% men) underwent height, weight, waist circumference (WC), and body fat percentage (BF%) bioelectrical impedance measurements during annual medical examinations. BMI-defined obesity rates were 4.6% for men and 17.2% for women, which were >3 and >1.8 times lower than Russian adults, respectively. WC-defined obesity rates were similar to BMI (3.3% for men and 10.3% for women), but BF%-defined obesity rates were much higher (22.2% for men and 55.2% for women). Although obesity rates were lower than those found among police officers in other countries, BMI alone was not a particularly accurate method for classifying weight status among Russian police officers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health and Obesity)
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Open AccessArticle
Body Mass Index (BMI) and Work Ability in Older Workers: Results from the Health and Employment after Fifty (HEAF) Prospective Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1647; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051647 - 03 Mar 2020
Abstract
This study explores associations between BMI and prolonged sickness absence; cutting down at work; and health-related job loss (HRJL) over two years of follow-up among workers aged ≥50 years. A cohort of 2299 men and 2425 women (aged 50–64 years) self-reported height and [...] Read more.
This study explores associations between BMI and prolonged sickness absence; cutting down at work; and health-related job loss (HRJL) over two years of follow-up among workers aged ≥50 years. A cohort of 2299 men and 2425 women (aged 50–64 years) self-reported height and weight at baseline and provided information about work ability at 12 and 24 months for the Health and Employment after Fifty (HEAF) Study. Associations between BMI and work ability were assessed by logistic regression and HRJL by multiple-record Cox’s proportional hazards models, with adjustment for other risk factors. The prevalence of obesity/severe obesity was 22.6%/1.2% amongst men and 21.4%/2.6% amongst women, respectively. In men and women, obesity and severe obesity predicted having to cut down at work for health over two years. In women, severe obesity predicted prolonged sickness absence, and also HRJL even after adjustment for age, proximity to retirement, financial difficulties, and lifestyle factors (hazard ratio [HR] 2.93, 95% CI 1.38, 6.23), and additional adjustment for health conditions (HR 2.52, 95% CI 1.12, 5.67). Obesity, and particularly severe obesity, negatively impacts work ability amongst people aged 50–64 years, with greatest effects in women. Obesity can be expected to hinder attempts to encourage work to older ages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health and Obesity)
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