Special Issue "Current Research Trends in Transgender Health"

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Cristiano Scandurra
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Guest Editor
Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Sciences and Dentistry, University of Naples Federico II, 80138 Napoli NA, Italy
Interests: clinical psychology; mental health; health promotion; health disparities; gender
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Kimberly Balsam
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology and Center for LGBTQ Evidence-Based Applied Research (CLEAR), Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
Interests: transgender and non-binary health; LGBTQ psychology; women and gender; same-sex and heterosexual couples; trauma; minority stress; CBT

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on advances in the health of transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) individuals. TGNC people represent a community that is diverse with respect to gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status, etc. Notwithstanding these differences, members of the TGNC population share many common experiences, such as belonging to a stigmatized minority. Indeed, although TGNC people represent a strongly resilient community, capable of successfully overcoming negative and adverse life conditions, they still experience high levels of prejudice that negatively affect their health and wellbeing. An increasing body of literature has, in fact, demonstrated that gender-related prejudice and stigma are among the main factors producing health disparities. However, the TGNC population is changing, especially in the younger segment, where a great percentage of people self-identify as non-binary, genderqueer, bigender, and so on, rejecting a binary view of the TGNC identity. Therefore, as researchers, we need to expand our knowledge base and look at TGNC people as a complex and segmented population with specific health needs.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to recent advances in TGNC health, with a specific interest in innovative methods, nationally representative data, young TGNC people, health disparities, minority stress, intersectionality, and resilience.

Prof. Cristiano Scandurra
Prof. Kimberly Balsam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • transgender;
  • non-binary;
  • health disparities;
  • minority stress;
  • intersectionality;
  • sexual health;
  • resilience;
  • individual-, interpersonal-, and community-based interventions;
  • nationally representative data;
  • young TGNC people.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Transition Trajectories: Contexts, Difficulties and Consequences Reported by Young Transgender and Non-Binary Spaniards
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6859; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186859 - 19 Sep 2020
Abstract
The transition process can have a significant impact on young transgender and non-binary individuals (TNBI), especially regarding their mental health. As such, this study aimed to explore the encountered difficulties and expectations of 225 young adults, between 14 and 25 years old, who [...] Read more.
The transition process can have a significant impact on young transgender and non-binary individuals (TNBI), especially regarding their mental health. As such, this study aimed to explore the encountered difficulties and expectations of 225 young adults, between 14 and 25 years old, who identify themselves as TNBI. Four different aspects were analyzed: difficulties related to the transition process; main current difficulties; if the current difficulties are due to the participants’ sexual orientation or gender identity; and if participants feel the need of changing something in their lives. Several obstacles either before, during or after the transition process were identified; and these obstacles have serious consequences in TBNI’s mental health. Questions regarding legislation, discrimination, transphobia, lack of social support, the pathologization of transgenderism, low self-esteem, anxiety symptomatology, among others, were pointed out by the participants. The narratives collected and analyzed in the present study appear as important inputs to the literature, which can be translated into the basis of further investigations and the improvement of professional practices in the health field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research Trends in Transgender Health)
Open AccessArticle
Personality Disorders and Personality Profiles in a Sample of Transgender Individuals Requesting Gender-Affirming Treatments
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1521; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051521 - 27 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The study aims to explore the personality patterns of a group of transgender individuals who accessed an Italian gender clinic to undergo gender affirming treatments, by evaluating both dimensional personality domains proposed by the Alternative Model of Personality Disorders and categorical DSM-IV personality [...] Read more.
The study aims to explore the personality patterns of a group of transgender individuals who accessed an Italian gender clinic to undergo gender affirming treatments, by evaluating both dimensional personality domains proposed by the Alternative Model of Personality Disorders and categorical DSM-IV personality disorder (PD) diagnoses. Eighty-seven participants (40 transgender women and 47 transgender men) completed the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II personality disorders. Scores obtained were compared to those of the normative samples of cisgender women and men. Results indicated that transgender women scored lower than cisgender women on two main domains (Negative Affectivity and Psychoticism) and on seven facets. As for transgender men, lower scores than cisgender men were found on Antagonism and on five facets. Transgender men scored higher than cisgender men on Depressivity. Nearly 50% of participants showed at least one PD diagnosis, with no gender differences in prevalence. Borderline PD was the most frequent diagnosis in the overall sample. Self-report measures provide a less maladaptive profile of personality functioning than the clinician-based categorical assessment. Results are interpreted in the light of the Minority Stress Model and support the need for a multi-method assessment of personality in medicalized transgender people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research Trends in Transgender Health)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Gender diverse children and adolescents in Italy: A qualitative study on specialized centers’ model of care and network

Authors: Guido Giovanardi et al.

Affiliation: Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, “Sapienza”, University of Rome, 00185 Roma, Italy

Title: Minority stress and sexual behaviors: examining predictors of condom-protected sex in transgender men and women

Authors: Angelo Brandelli Costa et al.

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

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