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Special Issue "Health Effects of Future Traffic Noise"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andreas Seidler

Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Medicine, Institute and Policlinic of Occupational and Social Medicine, Postal Address: Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: environmental epidemiology; health effects of traffic noise; occupational epidemiology; preventive health services research; systematic reviews; prevention of mental disorders; cancer epidemiology
Guest Editor
Dr. Janice Hegewald

Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Medicine, Institute and Policlinic of Occupational and Social Medicine, Postal Address: Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: occupational and environmental epidemiology; health effects of traffic noise; systematic reviews and meta-analytic methods; prevention of mental disorders; cancer epidemiology
Guest Editor
Ms. Karla A. Romero

MSc Epidemiology, M.S. Chemical Engineering
Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Medicine, Institute and Policlinic of Occupational and Social Medicine, Postal Address: Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: epidemiology of work and retirement; cognitive ageing; psychosocial workload; occupational epidemiology; systematic reviews and meta-analytic methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few years, knowledge about the health effects of traffic noise has grown immensely: several studies have found (inter alia) sleep disturbance, cardiovascular diseases and depression to be associated with exposure to traffic noise. However, there are considerable research gaps concerning specific disease risks for specific noise patterns—including the question of the health effects of combined noise from several traffic sources. Furthermore, traffic noise is going to change: the end of fuel combustion-powered mobility seems to be near, and new mobility concepts are developing, particularly in urban living environments. This special session at the Annual Meeting of the German Society of Social Medicine and Prevention (DGSMP), taking place from September 12 to 14, 2018 in Dresden, will consider these two topics, future mobility and the health effects of traffic noise, together. During this session, we expect to gain new insights for scientists in the field of acoustics, engineering, epidemiology, and public health, but also for urban city planners and political decision makers. The results of this highly relevant topic will be published in a special issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH).

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript, please go online at www.ijerph.com to register and submit it by the deadline. Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere. All manuscripts will be thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. Participants of this meeting will receive a discount on the article processing charges.

Prof. Dr. Andreas Seidler
Dr. Janice Hegewald
Ms. Karla A. Romero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Road Traffic Noise at the Residence, Annoyance, and Cognitive Function in Elderly Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1790; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101790
Received: 15 March 2019 / Revised: 15 May 2019 / Accepted: 18 May 2019 / Published: 20 May 2019
PDF Full-text (565 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The detrimental effects of traffic noise on cognition in children are well documented. Not much is known about the health effects in adults. We investigated the association of residential exposure to road traffic noise and annoyance due to road traffic noise with cognitive [...] Read more.
The detrimental effects of traffic noise on cognition in children are well documented. Not much is known about the health effects in adults. We investigated the association of residential exposure to road traffic noise and annoyance due to road traffic noise with cognitive function in a cohort of 288 elderly women from the longitudinal Study on the influence of Air pollution on Lung function, Inflammation and Aging (SALIA) in Germany. Residential noise levels—weighted 24-h mean (LDEN) and nighttime noise (LNIGHT)—were modeled for the most exposed facade of dwellings and dichotomized at ≥50 dB(A). Traffic noise annoyance (day and night) was estimated by questionnaire. Cognitive function was assessed using the Consortium to Establish a Registry on Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD-Plus) Neuropsychological Assessment Battery. The modeled noise levels were associated with impaired total cognition and the constructional praxis domain, independently of air pollution. Self-reported noise annoyance was associated with better performance in semantic memory and constructional praxis domains. This finding should be interpreted with caution since we could not control for potential confounding by hearing loss. Noise levels and annoyance were associated, but their health effects seemed mutually independent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Effects of Future Traffic Noise)
Figures

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Open AccessArticle
Is the Whole More Than the Sum of Its Parts? Health Effects of Different Types of Traffic Noise Combined
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1665; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091665
Received: 4 April 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 12 May 2019 / Published: 13 May 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (322 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many epidemiological studies find that people exposed to aircraft, road or railway traffic noise are at increased risk of illness, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. It is unclear how the combined exposure to these different types of traffic noise affects disease risks. [...] Read more.
Many epidemiological studies find that people exposed to aircraft, road or railway traffic noise are at increased risk of illness, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. It is unclear how the combined exposure to these different types of traffic noise affects disease risks. This study addresses this question with a large secondary data-based case-control study (“NORAH disease risk study”). The Akaike information criterion (AIC) is used to compare two different models estimating the disease risks of combined traffic noise. In comparison with the conventional energetic addition of noise levels, the multiplication of CVD risks as well as depression risks reveals a considerably better model fit as expressed by much lower AIC values. This is also the case when risk differences between different types of traffic noise are taken into account by applying supplements or reductions to the single traffic noise pressure levels in order to identify the best fitting energetic addition model. As a consequence, the conventionally performed energetic addition of noise levels might considerably underestimate the health risks of combined traffic noise. Based on the NORAH disease risk study, “epidemiological risk multiplication” seems to provide a better estimate of the health risks of combined traffic noise exposures compared to energetic addition. If confirmed in further studies, these results should imply consequences for noise protection measures as well as for traffic planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Effects of Future Traffic Noise)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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