Special Issue "Post Pandemic Mental Health Crisis"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Christopher M. Doran
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cluster for Resilience and Wellbeing, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University
Interests: mental health; substance use; economic evaluation; translational research
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Robert Stanton
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cluster for Resilience and Wellbeing, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University
Interests: mental health; public health; exercise; education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

COVID-19 has impacted every corner of the world. Countries such as Australia and New Zealand, with strong leadership and pro-active mitigation strategies, have been reasonably successful in limiting the spread of the disease. Other countries, such as the United States and some European countries, have adopted a more laissez-faire approach with catastrophic consequences. One thing is certain, the pandemic has had profound impacts on every society. These impacts are not limited to economic or physical domains, but also psychological. Although the prevalence of mental illness varies by country, recent data suggest the pandemic has resulted in an escalation of mental illness. Coupled with economic uncertainty through job losses and company closures, disruptions to social society caused by travel restrictions and social isolation, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted global wellbeing. This negative impact is evidenced through elevated levels of anxiety or depression to suicidal thoughts and behaviours. To explore these issues in more detail, and particularly the future psychological impacts, the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is running a Special Issue entitled “Post-Pandemic Mental Health Crisis”. As Guest Editors for this Special Issue, we would invite our colleagues to consider submitting their work to this issue. We are interested in canvassing a broad range of mental illness issues across the lifespan. Articles from all countries are welcome, and we look forward to hearing your research story.

Prof. Christopher M. Doran
Dr. Robert Stanton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • mental health
  • illness
  • resilience
  • wellbeing
  • stress
  • recovery
  • crisis

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
The MATES Case Management Model: Presenting Problems and Referral Pathways for a Novel Peer-Led Approach to Addressing Suicide in the Construction Industry
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6740; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136740 - 23 Jun 2021
Viewed by 576
Abstract
MATES in Construction (MATES) is a multimodal, peer-led, workplace suicide prevention and early intervention program developed to reduce the risk of suicide among construction industry workers through active facilitation of appropriate support. The MATES case management model provides an example of a nonclinical [...] Read more.
MATES in Construction (MATES) is a multimodal, peer-led, workplace suicide prevention and early intervention program developed to reduce the risk of suicide among construction industry workers through active facilitation of appropriate support. The MATES case management model provides an example of a nonclinical service for meeting the needs of individuals in the construction industry who, while at elevated risk of mental health problems and suicidality, are traditionally less likely to seek help. The aim of this research was to conduct an evaluation of the MATES case management database to quantify service demand, and to examine the demographic, occupational profile, presenting issues, referral pathways, and perceived benefit of case management among individuals who used this service. The research reports on routinely collected data from the Queensland MATES case management database, which contains records on 3759 individuals collected over the period 2010–2018, and findings from a small and opportunistic exit survey undertaken with 14 clients in 2019. Overall, findings suggest that the demand for case management through MATES has increased significantly and that clients felt that their needs and concerns were appropriately addressed. The most common presenting issues were relationship, work, and family problems, suicide, and mental health concerns. Findings confirm that causes of distress extend beyond the realm of mental disorder and span a range of psychosocial issues. Significantly, it offers an approach that may divert individuals in crisis away from presenting to over-run emergency departments, and towards services that are more equipped to meet their individual needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Pandemic Mental Health Crisis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Effects of Interoceptive Sensibility on Mental Health during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4616; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094616 - 27 Apr 2021
Viewed by 937
Abstract
The current coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has been reported to influence interoceptive sensibility. This study focused on adaptive and maladaptive aspects of interoceptive sensibility and examined how each aspect of interoceptive sensibility affects depression, anxiety, and somatization symptoms under the mild lockdown in [...] Read more.
The current coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has been reported to influence interoceptive sensibility. This study focused on adaptive and maladaptive aspects of interoceptive sensibility and examined how each aspect of interoceptive sensibility affects depression, anxiety, and somatization symptoms under the mild lockdown in Japan, which was not enforceable and a non-punitive lockdown. We used data from 10,672 participants who lived in prefectures where the emergency declaration was first applied in Japan. Interoceptive sensibility was measured by the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA). The findings show that Noticing, a subscale of the MAIA, significantly contributed to the worsening of psychological and somatic symptoms (all ps < 0.001). Conversely, Not-Distracting, Not-Worrying, Self-Regulation, and Trusting significantly contributed to the decrease of these symptoms (all ps < 0.05). The findings suggest that two aspects of interoceptive sensibility affected mental health in different ways during the mild lockdown. Mindfulness and mindfulness-based interventions would be effective in terms of enhancing adaptive aspects of interoceptive sensibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Pandemic Mental Health Crisis)
Back to TopTop