Special Issue "Health, Ageing and the Labour Market"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Philip Taylor
Website
Guest Editor
Federation Business School, Federation University Australia, Ballarat VIC 3353, Austrilia
Interests: older workers; retirement transitions; age discrimination; social policy for an ageing society

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ageing of the global population has led to calls to prolong working lives in order reduce social welfare costs and to maintain an adequate supply of labour. Internationally, efforts are underway to push out the age of final labour market withdrawal. Thus, pathways to early retirement have been closed or access severely restricted and pension ages have increased in many countries. There is evidence that, as a consequence, patterns of retirement behavior are changing. Alongside economic arguments for the prolongation of working lives, advocates for older people have argued that working at older ages provides health benefits. However, this probably depends on the nature of the available jobs. Some older workers may not benefit from having access to ‘good’ work. Others, for a range of reasons, may not be able to access work at all and, thus, may experience a prolonged period of joblessness before they can claim a pension. Thus, access to an early pension may be better for some workers than ongoing labour market engagement in certain circumstances.

This Special Issue seeks empirical papers concerned with critically examining the health effects of continued labour market engagement at older ages. Who will benefit from longer working lives and how will these benefits manifest? And how is prolonged joblessness experienced by older workers? We also welcome high-quality systematic reviews related to these matters. I would be very happy if this Special Issue serves as a trigger for considering more effective ways of managing the transition from work to retirement.

Prof. Philip Taylor
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Older workers
  • Healthy ageing
  • Retirement transitions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Population Aging and Public Health Support on EU Labor Markets
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1439; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041439 - 24 Feb 2020
Cited by 9
Abstract
Population aging and public health expenditure mainly dedicated to older dependent persons present major challenges for the European Union (EU) Member States, with profound implications for their economies and labor markets. Sustainable economic development relies on a well-balanced workforce of young and older [...] Read more.
Population aging and public health expenditure mainly dedicated to older dependent persons present major challenges for the European Union (EU) Member States, with profound implications for their economies and labor markets. Sustainable economic development relies on a well-balanced workforce of young and older people. As this balance shifts in favor of older people, productivity tends to suffer, on the one hand, and the older group demands more from health services, on the other hand. These requisites tend to manifest differently within developed and developing EU countries. This research aimed to assess population aging impacts on labor market coordinates (employment rate, labor productivity), in the framework of several health dimensions (namely, health government expenditure, hospital services, healthy life years, perceived health) and other economic and social factors. The analytical approach consisted of applying structural equation models, Gaussian graphical models, and macroeconometric models (robust regression and panel corrected standard errors) to EU panel data for the years 1995–2017. The results show significant dissimilarities between developed and developing EU countries, suggesting the need for specific policies and strategies for the labor market integration of older people, jointly with public health expenditure, with implications for EU labor market performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Ageing and the Labour Market)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Discrimination on Presenteeism among Aging Workers in the United States: Moderated Mediation Effect of Positive and Negative Affect
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1425; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041425 - 22 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
This study aimed to examine how perceived everyday discrimination influences presenteeism and how conscientiousness moderates the relationship between discrimination and positive affect among older workers. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine the mediating effect. The moderated mediation model was examined by [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine how perceived everyday discrimination influences presenteeism and how conscientiousness moderates the relationship between discrimination and positive affect among older workers. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine the mediating effect. The moderated mediation model was examined by PROCESS. The results of the final SEM model showed that discrimination was directly positively associated with presenteeism. Furthermore, positive affect was significantly inversely correlated with discrimination and presenteeism. In addition, negative affect was significantly positively correlated with discrimination and presenteeism. The significant indirect effect between perceived everyday discrimination and positive affect was significantly mediated by positive and negative affect. In addition, the results of the moderated mediation model indicate that positive affect was more likely to be influenced by perceived everyday discrimination among older workers with less conscientiousness, as compared with those with greater conscientiousness. To enhance work outcomes of aging workers in the United States, managers should foster highly conscientious aging workers, award those who are hardworking and goal-oriented, and combine personal goals and organizational goals through bonuses, holidays, and benefits. Policymakers should be mindful of the negative impact of discrimination on presenteeism and should target lowly conscientious older workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Ageing and the Labour Market)
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Open AccessArticle
Public Health Insurance, Non-Farm Labor Supply, and Farmers’ Income: Evidence from New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4865; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234865 - 03 Dec 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The major source of income of Chinese farmers is non-farm income, especially wages and salaries. Based on the economics theory of health and healthcare, their non-farm labor supply behavior could be affected by health insurance policies. The work presented in this paper focuses [...] Read more.
The major source of income of Chinese farmers is non-farm income, especially wages and salaries. Based on the economics theory of health and healthcare, their non-farm labor supply behavior could be affected by health insurance policies. The work presented in this paper focuses on the impact of the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) on farmers’ non-farm labor supply behavior in China. A four-part model regression approach was used to examine the relationship. Our dataset comprised of 8273 people, aged 45 or above, from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) conducted in 2011 and 2013. The empirical results showed that NRCMS significantly reduced non-farm labor force participation and employment. Compared to non-participants of the NRCMS, the non-farmer labor time of these participants reduced, but the supplementary medical insurance and immediate reimbursement of the NRCMS increased the participants’ non-farm labor time. Our results have contributed to the reform of China’s public health insurance and farms’ income growth, and it would be necessary to actively promote immediate reimbursement, gradually simplify reimbursement procedures for medical treatment in non-registered places, and eliminate the non-portability of NRCMS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Ageing and the Labour Market)
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