ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "The Economics of Health Behaviors"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019) | Viewed by 7272

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Chris Auld
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada
Interests: microeconometrics; health economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am organizing a Special Issue on the economics of health behaviors in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is an online, peer-reviewed, scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences, disasters and public health. For detailed information on the journal, please visit https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

The Special Issue on the economics of health behaviors will feature research examining economic aspects of health-enhancing or unhealthy behaviors. Examples of such behaviors include physical exercise, diet, risky sex, and the use of tobacco, e-cigarettes, alcohol, cannabis, and prescription or illicit opioids. Research addressing the causes or the consequences of such behaviors is welcome, as is research exploring interactions between health-affecting behaviors and other market or non-market outcomes, such as effects on or of labor market outcomes, education, and medical care. Studies may be either theoretical or empirical, and studies with policy relevance are particularly encouraged. Note the keywords are not exhaustive but rather suggest examples of relevant topics and methods.

Prof. Dr. Chris Auld
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Tobacco
  • Body weight
  • E-cigarettes
  • Risky sex
  • Opioids
  • Cannabis
  • Applied econometrics
  • Behavioral economics
  • Microeconomic theory

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Sugar-Sweetened and Diet Beverage Consumption in Philadelphia One Year after the Beverage Tax
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041336 - 19 Feb 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 5076
Abstract
In January 2017, Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) implemented an excise tax ($ 0.015/ounce) on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages. This study is a general population-based study to report on the longer-term impacts of the tax on within-person changes in consumption 12 months after implementation. A quasi-experimental [...] Read more.
In January 2017, Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) implemented an excise tax ($ 0.015/ounce) on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages. This study is a general population-based study to report on the longer-term impacts of the tax on within-person changes in consumption 12 months after implementation. A quasi-experimental difference-in-difference design was used to contrast Philadelphia vs. nearby comparison cities (Trenton, New Jersey; Camden, New Jersey; and Wilmington, Delaware) at baseline (December 2016–January 2017) vs. 12-month follow-up (December 2017–February 2018). A random-digit-dialing phone survey was administered to a population-based cohort. Analyses assessed changes in 30-day consumption frequency and ounces of sugar-sweetened and diet beverages (and a substitution beverage, bottled water) in the analytic sample (N = 515). After 12 months, relative to the comparison group, Philadelphians were slightly more likely to decrease their frequency of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (39.2% vs. 33.5%), and slightly less likely to increase their frequency of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (38.9% vs. 43.0%). The effects of the tax estimated in the adjusted difference-in-difference analysis were very small (for example, changes in monthly sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in Philadelphia relative to comparison cities was −3.03 times or −51.65 ounces) and confidence intervals were very wide. Results suggested that, one year after implementation, there was no major overall impact of the tax on general population-level consumption of sugar-sweetened or diet beverages, or bottled water. Future studies should test whether the tax’s effect differs in vulnerable sub-populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Economics of Health Behaviors)
Article
Link between Financial Management Behaviours and Quality of Relationship and Overall Life Satisfaction among Married and Cohabiting Couples: Insights from Application of Artificial Neural Networks
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1190; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041190 - 13 Feb 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2041
Abstract
Background: To explain the link between household finances and the quality of the relationship between married or cohabitating partners and their life satisfaction, the Family Stress Model (FSM) was used and placed within the theoretical framework of the Couples and Finances Theory (CFT). [...] Read more.
Background: To explain the link between household finances and the quality of the relationship between married or cohabitating partners and their life satisfaction, the Family Stress Model (FSM) was used and placed within the theoretical framework of the Couples and Finances Theory (CFT). Methods: The measures used to examine the relationship between partners were the Financial Management Behaviour Scale, the Marriage Questionnaire (KDM-2) adapted to a version for cohabitating couples, The Shared Goals and Values Scale, Harsh Start-up Scale, and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS). In order to find out the relationship between variables, artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied. The research was conducted on a sample of 500 couples living in Poland (384 married and 116 cohabitating couples). Results: The results indicate that overall life satisfaction is most influenced by fundamental, direct, current ways of dealing with the daily financial routine and by saving and investing behaviours. Credit management and insurance behaviours are the most important for the quality of the relationship between partners. Conclusions: The research shows that financial management behaviours have an impact on the quality of relationships as well as on the subjective well-being of people in a relationship, and their relationship dynamics. This finding may be used to highlight the psychological importance of financial management behaviours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Economics of Health Behaviors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop