Special Issue "How Can Comprehensive Care Improve the Quality of Care in Post-SARS-nCoV-2 Period?"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christos Lionis
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Guest Editor
General Practice and Primary Health Care, Head of Clinic of Social and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Crete, Greece AND Quest Professor at the Institute of Medicine and Health, University of Linkoping, Linkoping, Sweden
Interests: primary care; integrated care; multimorbidity; behavioral care; perceived risk
Dr. Elena Petelos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
SRF in Public Health, Lecturer in Evidence-Based Medicine and Evidence-Informed Policy, Clinic of Social and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Crete, Greece ;Health Services Research, CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University
Interests: evidence generation and synthesis; global public health; outcomes research; technology assessment; decision-making; policy preparedness
Prof. Dr. Christopher Dowrick
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Professor of Primary Medical Care, Department of Primary Care and Mental Health, University of Liverpool, UK;
Chair, World Organisation of Family Doctors Working Party for Mental Health;
General Pracitioner, Aintree Park Group Practice, Liverpool UK;
Visiting Research Professor, Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne, Australia
Interests: primary mental health care; multimorbidity; equity of access to high quality health care

Special Issue Information

    The world is currently experiencing a global health crisis, the SARS-nCov-2 outbreak, with the COVID-19 pandemic affecting people across the globe. This is the time to develop research and policy agendas based on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the sub-goal of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) of the United Nations, informing them through meaningful discussion on the level of preparedness, and the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare systems to successfully support people through the provision of comprehensive care (CC) during this pandemic and beyond. Community resilience and social cohesion are linked to the provision of care and the services available at the community level, as is the environment affecting care provision and service delivery. There is still debate on how to best define CC, although there is a consensus that its focus ought to be the continuum of health and social care services, and the provision thereof, in a context-relevant, accessible, and affordable manner, so that they meet the needs of all people, including patients and carers and friends and families. A key component of CC is integrated healthcare, with both terms often used almost interchangeably. However, even prior to the pandemic there was not a consensus on the type of services required to meet the needs of individuals and of communities; discourse extended to whether the provision of care can address all inequalities and the issues stemming from them, including through health promotion, increased levels of literacy, and health-in-all-policies (HiaP). The people most affected by the lack of access to health and social care services are those who live under the conditions of greatest vulnerability. Therefore, this Special Issue invites perspectives and approaches to inform the discussion on CC, encompassing evidence about its effectiveness and relevance for vulnerable people, people with mental health issues, as well as all those with multiple chronic conditions. Last but not least, outcomes and meaningful measures to assess the contribution of CC concerning UHC and the SDGs, will also be examined.

Dr. Christos Lionis
Dr. Elena Petelos
Prof. Dr. Christopher Dowrick
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • comprehensive
  • care
  • quality
  • provision
  • effectiveness

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Clearing the Smoke Screen: Smoking, Alcohol Consumption, and Stress Management Techniques among Canadian Long-Term Care Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6027; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176027 - 19 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 909
Abstract
Background: Currently, there is abundant research indicating that smoking and alcohol consumption have significant impacts on morbidity and mortality, though little is known about these behaviors among Canadian health care workers. The objective of this study was to examine health and coping behaviors, [...] Read more.
Background: Currently, there is abundant research indicating that smoking and alcohol consumption have significant impacts on morbidity and mortality, though little is known about these behaviors among Canadian health care workers. The objective of this study was to examine health and coping behaviors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption as well as stress management techniques, among health care workers consisting of gendered, racialized, and immigrant employees. Methods: Drawing on a single-case, mixed-methods study in Ontario, Canada, this paper presents under-researched data about smoking practices, alcohol consumption, and stress management techniques among health care workers in labor-intensive, high-stress, high-turnover environments. In particular, it identifies the various mechanisms for maintaining health and well-being. Results: The findings suggest that 7.7% of survey respondents reported smoking while 43.4% reported alcohol consumption, which were reported more frequently among immigrants than among non-immigrants. Participants also reported health-promoting activities in face-to-face interviews, such as mindful breathing techniques and drawing upon social support, while a few respondents reported alcohol consumption to specifically cope with sleep disturbances and job stress. Conclusions: Although smoking and alcohol consumption were both connected with coping strategies and leisure, they were predominant in immigrant groups compared to non-immigrant groups. Full article
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Article
I Teach Nursing as a Male Nursing Educator: The East Asian Perspective, Context, and Social Cognitive Career Experiences
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4327; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124327 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 943
Abstract
Social and cultural backgrounds, as well as understanding, play key roles in workforce development and human resource shortages, which are associated with the transition to nursing education and teaching from frontline nursing practices. A qualitative method, with the direction of the general inductive [...] Read more.
Social and cultural backgrounds, as well as understanding, play key roles in workforce development and human resource shortages, which are associated with the transition to nursing education and teaching from frontline nursing practices. A qualitative method, with the direction of the general inductive approach, was employed in this study. The researcher collected information from 18 male nursing educators who switched their senior roles (from the frontline and practicing fields to nursing education) at nursing schools in South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, China, and Malaysia. Three interview sessions were used to collect information. Three themes were merged from the information: (i) gender-oriented knowledge, teaching and learning; (ii) respect; and (iii) health promotion. More importantly, participants advocated that their male roles and identities provided uniqueness to patients, students, parents, and the general public concerning Asian customs and practices. Based on the social cognitive career theory, personal goals and achievements of career satisfaction took important roles. Although the general public may not agree with these career decisions, due to gender and social biases, participants continued to contribute their energy and knowledge in the health and social caring professions. Full article
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