Special Issue "Advances in Housing and Healthy Ageing"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dominic Aitken
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape, Newcastle University, NE1 7RU, UK
Assoc. Prof. Catherine Bailey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nursing, Midwifery & Health DEPARTMENT, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England NE1 8ST, UK
Interests: older people, social aspects of falls and fear of falling; creative engagement and dementia; housing, health and social care integration
Dr. Philip Hodgson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nursing, Midwifery & Health DEPARTMENT, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England NE1 8ST, UK
Dr. Gemma Wilson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nursing, Midwifery & Health Department, Northumbria University, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England NE1 8ST, UK

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

A Special Issue focusing on ‘Ageing, Home and Health’ is being prepared for the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. For detailed journal information, please go to: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Developing and advanced economies are experiencing both ageing populations and critical shortages of accessible and affordable homes (World Health Organization, 2015). Yet it is known that older people wish to stay at home even with limited mobility and long-term conditions. Within Europe, much of the existing housing stock is not accessible, and studies highlight how living alone in an inaccessible home may lead to older people’s isolation and social exclusion (European Anti-Poverty Network, 2016). Research from the United States suggests there has been an historical lack of government investment in accessible and affordable housing for low-income older adults and individuals living with disabilities (Stone, 2018).

Through hosting a home and health research group, the co-editors of this Special Edition, are well connected to academics, cross sector policy and provider leads (housing, health and social care services) and charitable and independent experts working in this field. The combined interests of this group highlights the rich breadth of ‘Ageing, Home and Health’ research, with topics spanning: repairs and maintenance, thermal comfort and/or fuel poverty, social isolation and loneliness, health inequalities, relocation services, retirement villages, sheltered housing, extra care, dementia-friendly communities, co-housing, modular and smart homes, park homes, social capital and community networks, urban planning, integration of housing, health and care services and supports and more.

In particular, current research, policy and practice priorities suggest a need for: a life course understanding of ageing (Walker, 2018); examples of initiatives with good outcomes that seek to provide accessible and affordable, ‘healthy’ and well connected homes, such as the ‘20 minute neighbourhood concept’ and age-friendly cities; domestic design/technology/aids and adaptations that meet changing needs as people age without being ageist; tackling individual and community, social isolation and loneliness at individual and community level; and addressing health inequalities, exploring the meaning of home from older people’s perspective to better understand housing needs in later life. This list is not exhaustive. We the co-editors are delighted to invite submissions to this critical issue on environmental research and public health.

Dr. Dominic Aitken
Assoc. Prof. Catherine Bailey
Dr. Philip Hodgson
Dr. Gemma Wilson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ageing and housing
  • accessible and affordable homes
  • social isolation
  • domestic design and technology
  • home adaptations and modifications

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
“What? That’s for Old People, that.” Home Adaptations, Ageing and Stigmatisation: A Qualitative Inquiry
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4989; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244989 - 08 Dec 2019
Abstract
Older people, even those living with long-term conditions or poor mobility, can be supported to live well at home, through adapting their home to meet changing need. Installing home adaptations, from grab rails to walk in shower rooms, is cost effective, may prevent [...] Read more.
Older people, even those living with long-term conditions or poor mobility, can be supported to live well at home, through adapting their home to meet changing need. Installing home adaptations, from grab rails to walk in shower rooms, is cost effective, may prevent falls, reduce social isolation and improve self confidence. Despite austerity cuts to public spending, the UK government increased home adaptations’ funding. However, not much is known about older people’s experiences and understanding of acquiring and living with home adaptations and uptake of home adaptations could be improved. Using wearable camera and face to face interview data, this qualitative study explored a diverse group of older people’s retrospective experiences (n = 30). Focus group discussions were also carried out with a wide range of professionals involved in the provision of home adaptations (n = 39). Findings suggest people may delay having adaptations, because of perceived stigmatising associations with decline and vulnerability. As delaying the installation of home adaptations until crisis point is known to reduce their effectiveness, such associations need to be challenged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Housing and Healthy Ageing)
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