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Modern Living and Advances in Children's Eye Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 3452

Special Issue Editors

Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde de Lisboa (ESTeSL)/Lisbon School of Health Technology, Av. D. João II, lote 4.69.01, 1990-096 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: myopia; binocular vision and strabismus
1. Institute for Research in Ophthalmology, Foundation for Ophthalmology Development, ul. Mickiewicza 24 / 3B, 60-836 Poznan, Poland
2. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Warmia and Mazury, 10-719 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: myopia; refractive errors; epidemiology of eye disorders; cataract and refractive disorders; retina disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan
Interests: myopia prevention and epidemiology; myopic complication treatment; cataract surgery; medical and surgical retina; stem cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past three decades, the prevalence of eye diseases has significantly increased, particularly with regard to childhood myopia. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the development and progression of myopia. However, increases in the prevalence of myopia do not seem to be predominantly due to genetic variation, but rather, environmental changes. Major environmental factors include one’s level of education and time spent outdoors. Other environmental factors include near work, screen time, urbanization and the socio-economic status of families. More recently, other aspects within lived environments, such as access to green spaces, have been linked to the lower prevalence of myopia.

However, more research, particularly related to the cultural attitudes of comunities and factors such as safety, weather and pollution, is necessary to avoid confunding factors. Outdoor pollution, measured as traffic-related pollution, has been associated with increased rates of myopia. Greater exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter and nitrogen oxides has been associated with an apparently adverse effect on retinal structural features. Indoor air pollution (e.g., tobacco smoking or poor ventilation) has been reported to be associated with conjunctivitis, glaucoma, cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Studies regarding types of environmental exposure that may disrupt circadian rhythms in humans are also emerging. Thus, research regarding modifiable environmental risk factors provides an important basis for the design of preventive interventions and treatment strategies to avoid visual impairment and blindness. Manuscripts that address environmental risk factors and eye diseases are invited to be submitted for publication in this Special Issue.

During early childhood, uncorrected refractive errors may affect visual development and result in amblyopia. Anisometropia is one of the most common causes of amblyopia, followed by strabismus and visual deprivation. Traditionally, the first step in treatment has been optical correction, followed by treatment with patching and/or pharmacological treatment. However, advances in amblyopia therapy are arising with the development of new technologies, including new binocular treatments. Thus, manuscripts regarding new treatment strategies that could be used to avoid visual impairment and blindness are also invited to be submitted for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. Carla Lança
Prof. Dr. Andrzej Grzybowski
Dr. Pei-Chang Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eye
  • myopia
  • amblyopia
  • children
  • epidemiology
  • risk factors
  • environment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1276 KiB  
Article
Prevalence, Characteristics, and Risk Factors of Retinal Hemorrhage among Full-Term Neonates in Southern China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 13927; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192113927 - 26 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1277
Abstract
Neonatal retinal hemorrhage (RH) is the most common ocular fundus disease among newborns. Early detection and timely intervention are vital for reducing the risk of visual impairment caused by RH. However, little is known about the prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors of RH [...] Read more.
Neonatal retinal hemorrhage (RH) is the most common ocular fundus disease among newborns. Early detection and timely intervention are vital for reducing the risk of visual impairment caused by RH. However, little is known about the prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors of RH in southern China. Full-term infants born in Qingyuan City during the first 10 days of each month in 2021 were included in this study. All infants underwent RetCam III retinal examinations. Detailed information on retinal hemorrhage, including involved eyes, bleeding severity, and affected area (extrafoveal macula, fovea, or optic disc), and clinical information on the neonates and their mothers was collected. The results showed that among the 1072 eligible neonates, 266 (24.8%) had neonatal retinal hemorrhage. Consistent bilateral retinal hemorrhage severity was observed in 83.2% of the cases. The prevalence of optic disc involved RH, extrafoveal macular involved RH and foveal involved RH were 23.7%, 81.2% and 2.63%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that lower birth weight (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.40–0.99; p < 0.05) and vaginal delivery (OR, 20.6; 95% CI, 9.10–46.5; p < 0.001) were risk factors of neonatal RH. The area under the ROC curve of vaginal delivery, combined with birth weight, as predictors of neonatal RH was 0.73, with 85.3% sensitivity and 23.9% specificity. The birth weight cutoff was 3460 g. Our results suggested that neonatal RH is common in full-term neonates in southern China. It usually has the same severity in both eyes and mostly involves the extrafoveal macular region. Vaginal delivery and low birth weight are risk factors for neonatal RH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Living and Advances in Children's Eye Health)
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9 pages, 1081 KiB  
Article
Sex-Specific Effect of Obesity on Epiblepharon in Different Age Groups: A Case-Control Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12839; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912839 - 07 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1272
Abstract
Obesity has been regarded as a risk factor for several ocular diseases. This study aims to investigate the age- and sex-specific relationship between epiblepharon and obesity in children. A retrospective case–control study was conducted using the Chang Gung Research Database. Children ≤ 18 [...] Read more.
Obesity has been regarded as a risk factor for several ocular diseases. This study aims to investigate the age- and sex-specific relationship between epiblepharon and obesity in children. A retrospective case–control study was conducted using the Chang Gung Research Database. Children ≤ 18 years of age with epiblepharon were identified from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2019. Children were classified into three groups: normal, overweight and obese groups. A total of 513 patients and 1026 controls (57.7% males) aged 1 to 18 matched by sex and age were included in the analysis. The median body mass index (BMI) of children with epiblepharon was significantly higher than that of children without epiblepharon (p < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, among boys aged 4 to 9 years, the BMI in boys with epiblepharon was significantly higher than that in boys without epiblepharon (p < 0.05) and the risk of epiblepahron in overweight/obese boys was significantly higher than in non-overweight boys (OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.07–2.82 for age 4 to 6; OR = 3.06, 95% CI = 1.56–6.03 for age 7 to 9). On the other hand, among girls aged 13 to 18 years, the BMI in adolescent girls with epiblepharon was significantly higher than that in the control group (p < 0.05) and overweight/obese girls had a statistically higher risk of persistent epiblepharon than non-overweight girls (OR = 3.70, 95% CI = 1.38–9.97). The association between obesity and epiblepharon varies in strength according to age in a sex-specific manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Living and Advances in Children's Eye Health)
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