Special Issue "Adolescent Substance Use and Related Harms"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kara Thompson
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, NS B2G 2W5, Canada
Interests: child and youth health; substance use; alcohol use; marijuana use; co-use; mental health; policy; prevention; harm reduction; developmental methodology; quantitative statistics; program evaluation
Prof. Dr. Scott Leatherdale
Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Interests: youth risk behaviour surveillance; natural experiment evaluation; predictors of substance use (tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, vaping); poly-substance use and trajectories of onset; substance use and mental health; comprehensive school health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Conor Gilligan
Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia
Interests: adolescent alcohol consumption; the role of parents in young people’s alcohol use; social norms relating to alcohol use; qualitative and quantitative research methodology
Dr. Hannah Allen
Website
Guest Editor
College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University, 325 Health and Human Development Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Interests: substance use; alcohol use; mental health; young adulthood; academic achievement; employment; prevention; longitudinal data; ecological momentary assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The high rates of substance use among youth (particularly alcohol, cannabis, and nicotine products), and the negative effects on their well-being, are a significant public health issue. Globally, rates of substance use during adolescence and young adulthood are higher than at any other age across the lifespan. Youth are also more likely to use substances in risky ways contributing to high rates of unintentional injuries and death, as well as a variety of social problems, such as academic difficulties and mental health. This Special Issue seeks to advance our understanding of the dynamic and emerging substance use trends and correlates of use among youth and inform public health responses to mitigate substance-related risk. Manuscripts that advance our knowledge on the antecedents, consequences, and prevention of youth substance use are welcome. The population of interest includes adolescents (12–17 years of age) and young adults (18–25 years of age). Both qualitative and quantitative studies are encouraged. Papers that focus on the risks associated with polysubstance use and other high-risk and emerging substance use trends among youth (i.e., vaping, use of edibles, misuse of prescription drugs) are preferred.

The keywords listed below provide an outline of some of the possible areas of interest.

Dr. Kara Thompson
Prof. Dr. Scott Leatherdale
Prof. Dr. Conor Gilligan
Dr. Hannah Allen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polysubstance use/Co-use
  • Alcohol
  • Cannabis
  • Quantitative
  • Qualitative
  • Prevention
  • Use patterns
  • Harm reduction
  • Acute harm
  • Chronic or long-term harm

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
The Mediating Effects of Protective Behavioral Strategies on the Relationship between Addiction-Prone Personality Traits and Alcohol-Related Problems among Emerging Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1814; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041814 - 12 Feb 2021
Viewed by 585
Abstract
Alcohol consumption and associated harms are an issue among emerging adults, and protective behavioral strategies (PBS) are actions with potential to minimize these harms. We conducted two studies aimed at determining whether the associations of at-risk personality traits (sensation-seeking [SS], impulsivity [IMP], hopelessness [...] Read more.
Alcohol consumption and associated harms are an issue among emerging adults, and protective behavioral strategies (PBS) are actions with potential to minimize these harms. We conducted two studies aimed at determining whether the associations of at-risk personality traits (sensation-seeking [SS], impulsivity [IMP], hopelessness [HOP], and anxiety-sensitivity [AS]) with increased problematic alcohol use could be explained through these variables’ associations with decreased PBS use. We tested two mediation models in which the relationship between at-risk personality traits and increased problematic alcohol use outcomes (Study 1: Alcohol volume; Study 2: Heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related harms) was partially mediated through decreased PBS use. Two samples of college students participated (N1 = 922, Mage1 = 20.11, 70.3% female; N2 = 1625, Mage2 = 18.78, 70.3% female). Results partially supported our hypotheses, providing new data on a mechanism that helps to explain the relationships between certain at-risk personality traits and problematic alcohol use, as these personalities are less likely to use PBS. In contrast, results showed that AS was positively related to alcohol-related harms and positively related to PBS, with the mediational path through PBS use being protective against problematic alcohol use. This pattern suggests that there are other factors/mediators working against the protective PBS pathway such that, overall, AS still presents risks for alcohol-related harms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adolescent Substance Use and Related Harms)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
E-Cigarette-Only and Dual Use among Adolescents in Ireland: Emerging Behaviours with Different Risk Profiles
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010332 - 05 Jan 2021
Viewed by 580
Abstract
E-cigarette-only use and dual-use are emerging behaviours among adolescent nicotine product users which have not yet been sufficiently explored. This study examines the prevalence of, and the factors associated with, nicotine product use in adolescence. The study is a cross-sectional analysis of the [...] Read more.
E-cigarette-only use and dual-use are emerging behaviours among adolescent nicotine product users which have not yet been sufficiently explored. This study examines the prevalence of, and the factors associated with, nicotine product use in adolescence. The study is a cross-sectional analysis of the 2018 Planet Youth survey completed by 15–16 year olds in the West of Ireland in 2018. The outcome of interest was current nicotine product use, defined as use at least once in the past 30 days. A main effects multinomial logistic regression model was used to examine the association between potential risk and protective factors and nicotine product use. Among 4422 adolescents 22.1% were current nicotine product users, consisting of 5.1% e-cigarette only users, 7.7% conventional cigarette only users, and 9.3% dual-users. For risk factors, the odds of association were weaker for e-cigarette only use compared to conventional cigarette and dual use. Participating in team sport four times/week or more significantly reduced the odds of conventional cigarette and dual use but had no association with e-cigarette only use (Cig: adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44–0.90; Dual-use: AOR 0.63, 95% CI 0.43–0.93). Similarly, having higher value for conventional social norms reduced the odds of conventional cigarette and dual use but not e-cigarette only use. This is the first study to show, among a generalisable sample, that dual-use is the most prevalent behaviour among adolescent nicotine product users in Ireland. Risk factor profiles differ across categories of use and prevention initiatives must be cognisant of this. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adolescent Substance Use and Related Harms)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessBrief Report
Association between Friends’ Use of Nicotine and Cannabis and Intake of both Substances among Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 695; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020695 - 15 Jan 2021
Viewed by 498
Abstract
Nicotine and cannabis use are common among adolescents and may be associated with behavioral problems, poor academic outcomes and use disorders. The goals of this analysis were the following: (1) Describe the influence of friends’ nicotine and cannabis smoking and vaping on self-reported [...] Read more.
Nicotine and cannabis use are common among adolescents and may be associated with behavioral problems, poor academic outcomes and use disorders. The goals of this analysis were the following: (1) Describe the influence of friends’ nicotine and cannabis smoking and vaping on self-reported use. (2) Describe the relationship between friends’ nicotine and cannabis use on participants’ urinary biomarkers of nicotine (cotinine) and cannabis (11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ⁹tetrahydrocannabinol=THC-COOH). This is a secondary analysis of survey and biomarker data collected in adolescents aged 12–21 between April 2017 and April 2018, in Long Island, New York. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted using SPSS 26. A cutoff value of ≥10 ng/mL was used to signify recent usage for urinary cotinine and THC-COOH levels. Over one-third of the 517 surveyed adolescents reported using tobacco and one-third reported using cannabis. A significant relationship between friends’ substance use and self-use was found. For both tobacco and cannabis, over 90% (p < 0.01) of participants with urinary biomarker levels above cutoff had friends who used the respective substance. Friends’ nicotine and friends’ cannabis use were each independently associated with urinary biomarker levels for those substances (for nicotine, beta = 88.29, p = 0.03; for cannabis, beta = 163.58, p = 0.03). Friends’ use of nicotine and cannabis is associated with adolescents’ intake, as well as the physiological exposure to those substances. These findings underscore the importance of including peer influence in the discussion with adolescents about tobacco and cannabis use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adolescent Substance Use and Related Harms)
Back to TopTop