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Bullying and Cyberbullying among Youths

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3694

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL60614, USA
Interests: bullying; cyberbullying; peers; family; culture; intervention; prevention; technology; adolescence; adjustment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bullying and cyberbullying are among the most important social and public health issues worldwide, threatening young people’s physical and emotional safety. Bullying can happen anywhere, including online, at school, in the workplace, or at home. It can lead to bodily harm, emotional distress, and deprivation of rights.

This Special Issue seeks papers on various subjects, including school bullying, cyberbullying, school violence, peer relationships, teacher–student relation, family cohesion, parenting behaviors, sibling relationships, and risk factors in bullying and cyberbullying among children, adolescents, or young adults. We welcome contributions from across the world.

Dr. Michelle F. Wright
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bullying
  • cyberbullying
  • bullying prevention
  • bullying intervention
  • wellbeing
  • mental health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 562 KiB  
Article
Developmental Trajectories of Cyber-Aggression among Early Adolescents in Canada: The Impact of Aggression, Gender, and Time Spent Online
by Bowen Xiao, Natasha Parent, Takara Bond, Johanna Sam and Jennifer Shapka
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 429; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040429 - 1 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1185
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to examine developmental trajectories of cyber-aggression in early adolescence, as well as their relationship with predictive factors related to cyber-aggression (e.g., overt aggression, gender, and time spent online). Participants were 384 adolescents from the Lower Mainland [...] Read more.
The objective of the present study was to examine developmental trajectories of cyber-aggression in early adolescence, as well as their relationship with predictive factors related to cyber-aggression (e.g., overt aggression, gender, and time spent online). Participants were 384 adolescents from the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada who were in grade six and grade seven at Time 1 of the study (192 boys, Mage = 13.62 years, SD = 0.74 year). Three years of longitudinal data on cyber-aggression, overt aggression, and time spent online were collected via online self-report questionnaires. Findings indicated three different trajectories of cyber-aggression: (a) a low-increasing (85.7% of the sample), (b) a stable trajectory (9.3% of the sample), and (c) a high-decreasing trajectory (4.9% of the sample). Adolescents who reported higher scores on overt aggression and spent more time online were more likely to be in the stable or high-decreasing groups. These findings highlight the importance of studying subgroups regarding the developmental course of cyber-aggression in early adolescence. The implications of present study findings give insight into gender differences and overt aggression among youth to inform cyber-aggression intervention and prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bullying and Cyberbullying among Youths)
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10 pages, 1236 KiB  
Article
Predicting Cyberbullying Perpetration in US Elementary School Children
by Christopher P. Barlett
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(15), 6442; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20156442 - 25 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1680
Abstract
Cyberbullying has emerged as a societal issue, and the majority of the research examining cyberbullying perpetration samples adolescent and/or emerging adult populations. A paucity of empirical attention has focused on young children (aged 8–10) regarding their cyberbullying frequency and predictors. The current study [...] Read more.
Cyberbullying has emerged as a societal issue, and the majority of the research examining cyberbullying perpetration samples adolescent and/or emerging adult populations. A paucity of empirical attention has focused on young children (aged 8–10) regarding their cyberbullying frequency and predictors. The current study sampled 142 US youth aged 8–10 years and assessed their cyberbullying perpetration rate and cellular phone ownership. Results indicated that (a) older participants were more likely to cyberbully than their younger peers; (b) higher rates of cyberbullying were found for youth who already owned a cellular phone; and (c) an interaction between participant age and cellular phone ownership was found, suggesting that cyberbullying was highest for only the 10-year-old group who owned a cellular phone. These findings have implications for (a) parents, school administrators, health care providers, and anyone else interested in better understanding the predictors of cyberbullying perpetration; (b) intervention specialists focused on reducing cyberbullying in youth; and (c) a researcher interested in understanding the basic theoretical underpinnings of cyberbullying. Based on these findings, we recommend that (a) cyberbullying interventions be administered to youth as early as elementary school; (b) parents/guardians carefully consider the positive and negative consequences of youth cellular phone usage; and (c) increased communication between youth and parents/guardians concerning youth cellular phone activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bullying and Cyberbullying among Youths)
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