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Special Issue "Impacts of Urban Overheating on Human Life: the Potential of Mitigation and Adaptation Technologies"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Riccardo Paolini

Senior Research Fellow, Faculty of Built Environment, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia
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Guest Editor
Dr. Negin Nazarian

Scientia Lecturer, Faculty of Built Environment, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia
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Scientific Advisor
Prof. Dr. Mattheos Santamouris

Anita Lawrence Chair in High Performance Architecture, Faculty of Built Environment, University of New South Wales
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Local climate change, including but not limited to the Urban Heat Island effect, is driven by the increasing expansion of our cities and enhanced by global climate change. The ensuing outcome is one of the main environmental challenges of today with major impacts on energy and human health. As the outdoor ambient temperature is increased during the cooling season, total and peak cooling energy and electricity demands rise consequently. Additionally, urban overheating impacts human well-being and health, ranging from increased thermal stress to peaks in morbidity and mortality, specifically during heatwaves. Therefore, it is paramount that mitigation and adaptation strategies for urban heating and overheating are proposed and assessed in detail.

To respond to this urgency, we invite researchers to contribute original research and review articles dealing with all aspects of urban heating and its impact on human life in urban areas. These contributions include recent experimental and modeling studies, implementing techniques and developments tailored to the assessment of urban heating, as well as mitigation and adaptation scenarios proposed and assessed in various urban climates. We are also interested in reviews with possible future lines of investigation. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • To investigate the impact of urban overheating on building energy needs, electricity demand, health, economy, and hygrothermal comfort.
  • To propose comprehensive methodologies and metrics for quantifying the local and global impact of urban overheating.
  • To present the cooling potential of innovative mitigation and adaptation technologies (from both urban and building design perspectives). In particular, we are interested in original contributions on the development and testing of methods to measure and model the performance of consolidated and advanced technologies, with the identification of the elements of uncertainty, evaluating their reliability and performance in the context of application.
  • To evaluate the impact and role of advanced mitigation and adaptation policies on human health, energy, peak electricity demand, environment, economy, and comfort.
  • To present innovative application of mitigation and adaptation solution in large-scale projects both at the theoretical and experimental level.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.


Dr. Negin Nazarian

Dr. Riccardo Paolini
Guest Editors

Prof. Dr. Mattheos Santamouris
Scientific Advisor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Increasing Probability of Heat-Related Mortality in a Mediterranean City Due to Urban Warming
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1571; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081571
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 21 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
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Abstract
Extreme temperatures impose thermal stress on human health, resulting in increased hospitalizations and mortality rate. We investigated the circulatory and respiratory causes of death for the years 2007 to 2014 inclusive for the urban and rural areas of Nicosia, Cyprus under urban heatwave
[...] Read more.
Extreme temperatures impose thermal stress on human health, resulting in increased hospitalizations and mortality rate. We investigated the circulatory and respiratory causes of death for the years 2007 to 2014 inclusive for the urban and rural areas of Nicosia, Cyprus under urban heatwave and non-heatwave conditions. Heatwaves were defined as four or more consecutive days with mean urban daily temperature over the 90th percentile threshold temperature of the eight investigated years. Lag period of adverse health effects was found to be up to three days following the occurrence of high temperatures. The relative risk (RR) for mortality rate under heatwave and non-heatwave conditions was found taking in consideration the lag period. The results showed the increase of mortality risk particularly for men of ages 65–69 (RR = 2.38) and women of ages 65–74 (around RR = 2.54) in the urban area, showing that women were more vulnerable to heat extremities. High temperatures were also associated with high ozone concentrations, but they did not impose an excess risk factor, as they did not reach extreme values. This analysis highlights the importance of preparing for potential heat related health impacts even in Cyprus, which is an island with frequent heatwaves. Full article
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