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Secondary Health Data for Monitoring Chronic Health Conditions and Assessing Healthcare Performances

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 3306

Special Issue Editors

Centre of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and information technology, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Tronto, 10/A, Ancona, Italy
Interests: biostatistics; epidemiological studies; secondary health data; chronic diseases; disease determinants; healthcare assessment

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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Service of Biostatistics, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Piazza Rinascimento, 7, Urbino, Italy
Interests: biostatistics; nucleic acid quantification; epidemiology; sports health; nutrition
Centre of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and information technology, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Tronto, 10/A, Ancona, Italy
Interests: biostatistics; epidemiology; secondary health data; chronic diseases; disease determinants; health disparities; frailty

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic diseases are a threat to people’s health and to the sustainability of health organisations. Despite the considerable amount of research conducted during the past few decades to describe the epidemiology and the impact on the health of chronic diseases, because of the population aging, the disease burden and multimorbidity have increased, leading to higher patient frailty. Therefore, new evidence is needed to assess the impact of chronicity in the population, its evolution over time, the impact of new technologies in disease management and to design appropriate adaptation to health policies. In this context, the availability of health data from secondary sources, such as administrative or healthcare utilization databases, medical record databases, population-based disease registries, hospital-based disease registries, health surveys, represents a useful tool to estimate disease burden and monitoring and assessing healthcare interventions. The large population covered, the continuity and timeliness of data availability, low cost, and applicability for studying real-world practice are characteristics that have contributed to the increased use of these secondary data sources in epidemiological studies. On the other hand, challenges in using these data and strategies to improve their usefulness concern the quality of the data and the application of rigorous and standardized methodology for planning and conducting observational studies, which are rapidly evolving.

This Special Issue of IJERPH is addressed to studies using secondary health data for monitoring chronic health conditions, analysing their determinants, and evaluating healthcare interventions in chronic patients.

Prof. Dr. Edlira Skrami
Dr. Davide Sisti
Prof. Dr. Rosaria Gesuita
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • secondary health databases
  • chronic diseases
  • real-world evidence
  • real-world data
  • methodology
  • epidemiology
  • disease burden
  • healthcare assessment
  • healthcare monitoring
  • value-based healthcare
  • cost-effectiveness

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 1176 KiB  
Article
Prognosis and Survival in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis in the Era of Antifibrotic Therapy in Italy: Evidence from a Longitudinal Population Study Based on Healthcare Utilization Databases
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16689; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416689 - 12 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1253
Abstract
The aim was to evaluate the determinants of acute exacerbation (AE) and death in new cases of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) using administrative databases in the Marche Region. Adults at their first prescription of antifibrotics or hospitalization with a diagnosis of IPF occurring [...] Read more.
The aim was to evaluate the determinants of acute exacerbation (AE) and death in new cases of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) using administrative databases in the Marche Region. Adults at their first prescription of antifibrotics or hospitalization with a diagnosis of IPF occurring in 2014–2019 were considered as new cases. Multiple Cox regression was used to estimate the risk of AE and of all-cause mortality adjusted by demographic and clinical characteristics, stratifying patients according to antifibrotic treatment. Overall, 676 new cases of IPF were identified and 276 deaths and 248 AE events occurred. In never-treated patients, the risk of AE was higher in patients with poor health conditions at diagnosis; the risk of death was higher in males, in patients aged ≥75 and in those with poor health conditions at baseline. The increasing number of AEs increased the risk of death in treated and never-treated patients. Within the limits of an observational study based on secondary data, the combined use of healthcare administrative databases allows the accurate analysis of progression and survival of IPF from the beginning of the antifibrotic therapy era, suggesting that timely and early diagnosis is critical to prescribing the most suitable treatment to increase survival and maintain a healthy life expectancy. Full article
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12 pages, 1083 KiB  
Article
Clinical Network for Big Data and Personalized Health: Study Protocol and Preliminary Results
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6365; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116365 - 24 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1462
Abstract
The use of secondary hospital-based clinical data and electronical health records (EHR) represent a cost-efficient alternative to investigate chronic conditions. We present the Clinical Network Big Data and Personalised Health project, which collects EHRs for patients accessing hospitals in Central-Southern Italy, through an [...] Read more.
The use of secondary hospital-based clinical data and electronical health records (EHR) represent a cost-efficient alternative to investigate chronic conditions. We present the Clinical Network Big Data and Personalised Health project, which collects EHRs for patients accessing hospitals in Central-Southern Italy, through an integrated digital platform to create a digital hub for the collection, management and analysis of personal, clinical and environmental information for patients, associated with a biobank to perform multi-omic analyses. A total of 12,864 participants (61.7% women, mean age 52.6 ± 17.6 years) signed a written informed consent to allow access to their EHRs. The majority of hospital access was in obstetrics and gynaecology (36.3%), while the main reason for hospitalization was represented by diseases of the circulatory system (21.2%). Participants had a secondary education (63.5%), were mostly retired (25.45%), reported low levels of physical activity (59.6%), had low adherence to the Mediterranean diet and were smokers (30.2%). A large percentage (35.8%) were overweight and the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia was 36.4%, 11.1% and 19.6%, respectively. Blood samples were retrieved for 8686 patients (67.5%). This project is aimed at creating a digital hub for the collection, management and analysis of personal, clinical, diagnostic and environmental information for patients, and is associated with a biobank to perform multi-omic analyses. Full article
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