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Factors Associated with Successful Smoking Cessation

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (11 April 2024) | Viewed by 3581

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A2, Canada
Interests: general respirology; COPD; sarcoidosis; smoking cessation; asthma

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aim: The aim of this special issue is to highlight individual traits, interventions, programs and/or policies associated with successful smoking cessation

Commercial tobacco use continues to be the leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide. Although the prevalence of smoking has declined in many countries across the world over the last several decades, the negative health impacts of smoking continue to rise due to a growing and aging population. Conversely, among low- and middle-income countries, there has been little decline in smoking prevalence over this same time frame 1. Furthermore, with the rise in electronic nicotine delivery devices, particularly vaping among youth, the effects of early nicotine exposure, its risk of dependence and potential transition to commercial tobacco, remains a public health threat 2. Higher smoking prevalence is tied to almost every indicator of deprivation and/or marginalization and the combined effects of these factors propagate inequity in health outcomes associated with smoking tobacco.

Success with reducing tobacco consumption and smoking cessation at a population level requires a multi-level approach to governmental policies and regulations, community interventions and health system programs and supports. At an individual level, demographic, behavioral and environmental factors can all influence a person’s chance of realizing smoking cessation 3. Given the tight association between poverty, marginalization and deprivation and continued smoking behavior, there is an urgent need to examine policies, programs, and interventions that take into consideration and/or focus on these structural factors when addressing smoking cessation.

This Special Issue covers various approaches to successful smoking cessation with a focus on policies, programs, interventions targeting marginalized populations. Original papers and Reviews that incorporate culturally-sensitive and equity-focused programs and policies are encouraged.

References

  1. Dai X.; Gakidou E.; Lopez A.D. Evolution of the global smoking epidemic over the past half century: strengthening the evidence base for policy action. Control 2022, 31,129–137.
  2. Chapman S.; Bareham D.; Maziak W. The Gateway Effect of E-cigarettes: Reflections on Main Criticisms. Nicotine Tob Res. 2019 21(5), 695–698.
  3. Lee CW.; Kahende J. Factors associated with successful smoking cessation in the United States, 2000. Am J Public Health. 2007 97(8), 1503–9.

Dr. Erika D. Penz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smoking cessation
  • tobacco reduction policy
  • vaping
  • program
  • health (in)equity
  • health system program

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 321 KiB  
Article
Predictors of Re-Engagement after Relapse in a Tobacco Quit Line Intervention: Secondary Analysis from a Randomized Clinical Trial
by Kara P. Wiseman, Chase A. Aycock, Indika Mallawaarachchi, Xin-Qun Wang, Daniel G. Cassidy, Marc A. Patience, Melissa A. Little, G. Wayne Talcott and Robert C. Klesges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1229; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021229 - 10 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1339
Abstract
People who smoke often make several quit attempts before successfully maintaining abstinence. Therefore, incorporating re-engagement for people who fail to initially quit could increase quit attempts and ultimately increase cessation rates. Within the context of quit line-based interventions, it remains unknown what characteristics [...] Read more.
People who smoke often make several quit attempts before successfully maintaining abstinence. Therefore, incorporating re-engagement for people who fail to initially quit could increase quit attempts and ultimately increase cessation rates. Within the context of quit line-based interventions, it remains unknown what characteristics are associated with re-engagement. The purpose of this study was to assess associations between demographic and motivational characteristics, tobacco use, and initial intervention engagement with re-engagement in a tobacco quit line intervention. Among 372 adults who reported smoking three months after initiating a quit line-facilitated quit attempt as part of a larger randomized clinical trial, associations between personal characteristics (e.g., age, gender, nicotine dependence, and confidence in their ability to quit smoking) and initial intervention engagement (number of completed counseling sessions and use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)) with re-engagement (accepting an offer to re-initiate the quit line intervention) were determined using multivariable logistic regression modeling. Compared to non-White participants, White participants had lower odds of re-engaging (OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.75). Number of initial counseling sessions completed was associated with re-engaging. NRT use during the initial intervention was not associated with re-engaging. Initial intervention engagement is important in the process of re-engagement, specifically attending counseling sessions. Exploration of associations between initial intervention engagement and potentially modifiable motivational factors is needed to be potentially leveraged in future interventions to maintain continued engagement in cessation among adults who smoke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Associated with Successful Smoking Cessation)
14 pages, 666 KiB  
Article
Spirometry and Smoking Cessation in Primary Care: The ESPIROTAB STUDY, A Randomized Clinical Trial
by María del Mar Rodriguez-Alvarez, Josep Roca-Antonio, Silvia Martínez-González, Victoria Vilà-Palau, Carla Chacón, Alexandre Ortega-Roca, Eulàlia Borrell-Thiò, Susana Erazo, Jordi Almirall-Pujol and Pere Torán-Monserrat
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14557; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114557 - 06 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1675
Abstract
This study aims to evaluate the effect of regularly reporting spirometry results during smoking cessation counseling from a primary care physician on the quit rate in adult smokers. Methods: A randomized, two-arm intervention study was conducted at six primary care centers. A total [...] Read more.
This study aims to evaluate the effect of regularly reporting spirometry results during smoking cessation counseling from a primary care physician on the quit rate in adult smokers. Methods: A randomized, two-arm intervention study was conducted at six primary care centers. A total of 350 smokers, ≥18 years of age, who consulted their primary care physician, participated in the study. At the selection visit, smokers who gave their consent to participate underwent spirometry. Subsequently, an appointment (visit 0) was scheduled to complete a nicotine dependence test, a smoking cessation motivation questionnaire, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Participants were also offered brief, structured advice on how to quit smoking, as well as detailed information on spirometry results. Patients were then randomized and scheduled for follow-up visits at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Both arms received brief, structured advice and detailed information on spirometry results at visit 0. At consecutive follow-up visits, the control group only received brief, structured smoking cessation advice, while the intervention group also received information on initial spirometry results at visits 3 and 6, and a spirometry retest at visit 12. Exhaled carbon monoxide testing was used to check smoking cessation. Results: The study included 350 smokers; 179 were assigned to the control group and 171 to the intervention group. Smoking cessation at one year was 24.0% in the intervention group compared to 16.2% in the control group. At two years, it was 25.2% in the intervention group and 18.4% in the control group. Overall, the adjusted odds of quitting smoking in the intervention group were 42% higher than in the control group (p = 0.018). Conclusions: Regular and detailed feedback of spirometry results with smokers increases smoking cessation. Specifically, the likelihood of quitting smoking in the intervention group is 1.42 times higher than in the control group (p = 0.018). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Associated with Successful Smoking Cessation)
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