Special Issue "Advances in Kinesiology and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jung-Min Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, College of Physical Education, Kyung Hee University (Global Campus), 1732 Deokyoungdaero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17014, Korea
Interests: physical activity; accelerometer; wearable tracker; health promotion
Dr. Hyun Chul Jung
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport Coaching, College of Physical Education, Kyung Hee University (Global Campus), 1732 Deokyoungdaero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17014, Korea
Interests: athletic performance; physical fitness; body composition; growth and development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Numerous studies have been performed to accumulate abundant knowledge on human movement from the point of view of human behaviour related to health and quality of life. The most valuable findings, derived from conducting professional research and practice in the field of kinesiology, are that regular physical activity provides countless health benefits and the field of kinesiology has direct applications in improving health and quality of life. Kinesiologists are continuously obtaining new knowledge through advanced technologies and research; thus, knowledge of how to improve health is also continuously being updated, contributing toward optimizing the health and quality of life of the population, and significantly reducing health care costs.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research will discuss advanced research methods (original research, reviews, and meta-analysis) applied to various aspects of the kinesiology field, which include exercise physiology, biomechanics, exercise psychology, physical activity, exercise training, sports performance, health promotion, sport sociology, and strength and conditioning research. Advanced investigations to promote health and physical activity are encouraged and submissions from all disciplines will be considered. In addition, papers addressing these topics to a high academic standard, aligned with a practical focus on improving health and physical activity, are highly encouraged. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field. 

Dr. Jung-Min Lee
Dr. Hyun Chul Jung
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • exercise physiology
  • biomechanics
  • physical fitness
  • strength and conditioning
  • athletic training
  • health promotion
  • sports sociology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Focal Knee Joint Cooling on Static and Dynamic Strength of the Quadriceps: Innovative Approach to Muscle Conditioning
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4890; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094890 - 04 May 2021
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Abstract
Recent evidence suggests an innovative approach to muscle conditioning: focal knee joint cooling (FKJC) appears to improve quadriceps function, including static (isometric) strength. However, there is limited evidence on the effects of FKJC on dynamic (concentric and eccentric) strength. Thus, the purpose of [...] Read more.
Recent evidence suggests an innovative approach to muscle conditioning: focal knee joint cooling (FKJC) appears to improve quadriceps function, including static (isometric) strength. However, there is limited evidence on the effects of FKJC on dynamic (concentric and eccentric) strength. Thus, the purpose of the study was to examine dynamic quadriceps strength following FKJC as well as static strength. Twenty-one college-aged participants volunteered. They randomly underwent 20 min of FKJC and control condition at least 72 h apart. FKJC involves two ice bags, placed on the anterior and posterior surfaces of the knee, whereas the control condition received a plastic ice bag filled with candy corn. We assessed isometric and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) quadriceps strength at two different velocities (60°/s and 180°/s). Participants performed three maximal voluntary contractions for each mode of muscle contraction, before and after each treatment (immediately, 20, and 40 min after). The outcome variable was maximum knee extension peak torque. FKJC did not change peak torque during any mode of muscle contraction (p > 0.05). The current findings suggest that 20 min of FKJC does not change static (isometric) or dynamic (isokinetic) strength of the quadriceps. FKJC was neither beneficial nor harmful to static or dynamic muscular strength. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Kinesiology and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Carrying Asymmetric Loads While Walking on a Treadmill Interferes with Lower Limb Coordination
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4549; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094549 - 25 Apr 2021
Viewed by 258
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different load carriage modes on coordinative patterns in the lower extremities during walking. Twenty-five university students walked on a treadmill at their preferred pace under three different load conditions: symmetric load (5% [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different load carriage modes on coordinative patterns in the lower extremities during walking. Twenty-five university students walked on a treadmill at their preferred pace under three different load conditions: symmetric load (5% of body mass in messenger bags on each shoulder hanging vertically and against the hips), asymmetric load 1 (10% of body mass in a messenger bag on one shoulder hanging vertically against the ipsilateral hip), and asymmetric load 2 (10% of body mass in a messenger bag on one shoulder with the bag draped across the trunk to the contralateral hip). Altered thigh-shank and shank-foot couplings were found for the loaded side during the stance of gait when comparing the asymmetric 1 and 2 to the symmetric load. In addition, thigh-thigh coupling was changed during gait when comparing the asymmetric load 2 and symmetric load. However, we did not find any significant differences in intralimb and interlimb couplings between the two different asymmetric load conditions. The results suggest potential benefits when carrying symmetrical loads in order to decrease abnormal limb coordination in daily activities. Thus, it may be advisable to distribute load more symmetrically to avoid abnormal gait. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Kinesiology and Health)
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