Special Issue "Healthy Lifestyles: Focus on Nutrition and Exercise Interventions"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. John W. Apolzan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, United States
Interests: nutrition; metabolism; obesity; mHealth; physical activity; environment; behavioral science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity is a global health concern. We need to better understand the contribution of energy intake and energy expenditure to its etiology. In this Special Issue, the contributions of intake and expenditure through diet and exercise interventions will be examined. This Special Issue seeks research papers (original research, reviews, and meta-analysis) on various aspects of nutritional and exercise interventions to help to prevent disease and to promote public health. Further, in addition to body weight and cardiometabolic health outcomes, other physiological and psychological endpoints are welcomed (e.g., nutrient status, physical function, affect).

The submission of all types of manuscripts from rigorous randomized clinical trials to pragmatic community-based designs is encouraged. Thus, controlled or free-living diet and exercise interventions are acceptable. It is understood submissions will often utilize multidisciplinary and collaborative research. Original research papers as well as systematic reviews and meta-analysis are welcomed.

Dr. John W. Apolzan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Physical activity
  • Resistance training
  • Lifestyle intervention
  • mHealth
  • Body weight
  • Cardiometabolic health
  • Physical functioning
  • Mood/affect

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Endurance Training vs. Circuit Resistance Training: Effects on Lipid Profile and Anthropometric/Body Composition Status in Healthy Young Adult Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1222; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041222 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Background: Endurance training (ET) and resistance training (RT) are known to be effective in improving anthropometric/body composition and lipid panel indicators, but there is an evident lack of studies on differential effects of these two forms of physical exercise (PE). This study aimed [...] Read more.
Background: Endurance training (ET) and resistance training (RT) are known to be effective in improving anthropometric/body composition and lipid panel indicators, but there is an evident lack of studies on differential effects of these two forms of physical exercise (PE). This study aimed to evaluate the differential effects of 8-week ET and RT among young adult women. Methods: Participants were women (n = 57; age: 23 ± 3 years; initial body height: 165 ± 6 cm; body mass: 66.79 ± 7.23 kg; BMI: 24.37 ± 2.57 kg/m2) divided into the ET group (n = 20), RT group (n = 19), and non-exercising control group (n = 18). All participants were tested for cardiovascular risk factors (CRF), including total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides, glucose, and anthropometric/body composition (body mass, body mass index, skinfold measures, body fat %) at the beginning and at the end of the study. Over the 8 weeks, the ET group trained three times/week on a treadmill while the RT group participated in equal number of circuit weight training sessions. Both types of training were planned according to participants’ pre-study fitness status. Results: A two-factor analysis of variance for repeated measurements (“group” × “measurement”) revealed significant main effects for “measurement” in CRF. The “group x measurement” interaction was significant for CRF. The post-hoc analysis indicated significant improvements in CRF for RT and ET. No significant differential effects between RT and ET were evidenced. Conclusions: The results of this study evidence improvements of CRF in young adult women as a result of 8-week ET and RT. The lack of differential training-effects may be attributed to the fact that all participants underwent pre-study screening of their fitness status, which resulted in application of accurate training loads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Lifestyles: Focus on Nutrition and Exercise Interventions)
Open AccessArticle
Virtual Reality Gaming Elevates Heart Rate but Not Energy Expenditure Compared to Conventional Exercise in Adult Males
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4406; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224406 - 11 Nov 2019
Abstract
Virtual reality using head-mounted displays (HMD) could provide enhanced physical load during active gaming (AG) compared to traditional displays. We aimed to compare the physical load elicited by conventional exercise and AG with an HMD. We measured energy expenditure (EE) and heart rate [...] Read more.
Virtual reality using head-mounted displays (HMD) could provide enhanced physical load during active gaming (AG) compared to traditional displays. We aimed to compare the physical load elicited by conventional exercise and AG with an HMD. We measured energy expenditure (EE) and heart rate (HR) in nine healthy men (age: 27 ± 5 years) performing three testing components in a randomised order: walking at 6 km/h (W6), AG, and AG with an additional constraint (AGW; wrist-worn weights). Although we found that HR was not significantly different between W6 and the two modes of AG, actual energy expenditure was consistently lower in AG and AGW compared to W6. We observed that playing AG with wrist-worn weights could be used as a means of increasing energy expenditure only at maximum game level, but ineffective otherwise. Our findings indicate that AG in an HMD may not provide a sufficient stimulus to meet recommended physical activity levels despite increased psychophysiological load. The differential outcomes of measures of HR and EE indicates that HR should not be used as an indicator of EE in AG. Yet, adding a simple constraint (wrist-worn weights) proved to be a simple and effective measure to increase EE during AG. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Lifestyles: Focus on Nutrition and Exercise Interventions)
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Open AccessProtocol
A Systematic Review Protocol of the Barriers to Both Physical Activity and Obesity Counselling in the Secondary Care Setting as Reported by Healthcare Providers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041195 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Physical activity and obesity counselling have both been gaining increasing interest in preventive health and treatment. However, most healthcare professionals do not provide advice on these topics nearly as often as they should. There are many reasons for this. Common barriers for the [...] Read more.
Physical activity and obesity counselling have both been gaining increasing interest in preventive health and treatment. However, most healthcare professionals do not provide advice on these topics nearly as often as they should. There are many reasons for this. Common barriers for the provision of brief advice on physical activity and obesity in both primary and secondary care are lack of time, motivation and knowledge. Systematic reviews have been published on the barriers of physical activity and obesity counselling in the primary care setting, but there is no published work on the barriers present in secondary care. This systematic review aims to assess all published data that discuss the barriers of physical activity and obesity counselling as noted by healthcare providers in secondary care. Four databases will be searched using the same search strategy, and the findings will be compiled using the COM-B model to explore the frequency of a reported barrier. This systematic review will be beneficial not only to practicing healthcare providers, but also the educational and managerial staff of secondary care facilities, as it may highlight the need for further training to fill gaps in the provision of preventive healthcare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Lifestyles: Focus on Nutrition and Exercise Interventions)
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