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Exercise Injury and Rehabilitation

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2024) | Viewed by 2548

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Francisco de Vitoria, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Spain
Interests: sports science; strength & conditioning; sport training; athletic performance; sports injuries; injury prevention
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Comillas Pontifical University, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: sports injuries; exercise testing; sports acience; injury prevention; athletic performance; physical activity; resistance training
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sports injuries are a limiting factor of sports performance in elite athletes. However, little is known about the mechanisms contributing to muscle injuries and their correlation with exercise type. Moreover, there is a lack of understanding regarding the interactions between muscle injuries, exercise, and injury prevention strategies.

For this Special Issue, we are particularly interested in original and review articles exploring new/under-studied aspects of muscle injuries, injury prevention programs, and the association between them. We welcome conceptual and practical insights that can inform injury prevention interventions.

We intend to achieve an updated and comprehensive picture of muscle injury prevalence and prevention programs across diverse, challenging contexts.

Dr. Alfredo Bravo-Sánchez
Dr. Pablo Abián
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • muscle injury
  • lower extremity muscle injuries
  • injury prevention
  • acute muscle injuries
  • prevention and treatment of injuries
  • physical activity
  • exercise injuries

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 653 KiB  
Article
DEXA Body Composition Asymmetry Analysis and Association to Injury Risk and Low Back Pain in University Soccer Players
by Nicolas Vaillancourt, Chanelle Montpetit, Victoria Carile and Maryse Fortin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(5), 559; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21050559 - 28 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Soccer is a laterally dominant sport owing to the repetitive nature of unilateral kicking. The relationship between functional and body composition asymmetries related to limb dominance in soccer players has yet to be established. When present, asymmetries can increase the risk of injury [...] Read more.
Soccer is a laterally dominant sport owing to the repetitive nature of unilateral kicking. The relationship between functional and body composition asymmetries related to limb dominance in soccer players has yet to be established. When present, asymmetries can increase the risk of injury and low back pain. Our study investigated whether lateral dominance is associated with limb asymmetries in a comprehensive body composition assessment among varsity soccer players. Twenty-seven varsity soccer players (age 20.4 ± 1.7 years old; BMI 22.6 ± 4.6 kg/m2) participated in this study. Body composition was assessed through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans. Results showed low lower limb asymmetry indices in both males (3.82%) and females (3.36%) compared to normal ranges. However, upper limb lean mass exhibited high asymmetry, surpassing thresholds in males (7.3%) and females (4.39%). Significant differences were found in total bone mass among males and total lean body mass among females. Male players exhibited higher asymmetry indices in both arm and trunk mass compared to females. Despite these asymmetries, no significant correlations were found between asymmetry indices and occurrences of lower limb injury or low back pain. The study suggests that while evaluating body composition for injury prevention in soccer shows potential, lateral dominance may be influenced by factors extending beyond sport-specific adaptations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Injury and Rehabilitation)
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9 pages, 657 KiB  
Article
Physical Inactivity Levels of European Adolescents in 2002, 2005, 2013, and 2017
by Jorge López-Fernández, Alejandro López-Valenciano, Gemma Pearce, Robert J. Copeland, Gary Liguori, Alfonso Jiménez and Xian Mayo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3758; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043758 - 20 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1213
Abstract
Sport and Physical Activity (PA) Special Eurobarometer surveys may inform of the physical inactivity (PIA) levels in the European Union (EU). This study aimed to analyse the PIA levels of EU adolescents (15–17 years) in four time points, according to gender. The data [...] Read more.
Sport and Physical Activity (PA) Special Eurobarometer surveys may inform of the physical inactivity (PIA) levels in the European Union (EU). This study aimed to analyse the PIA levels of EU adolescents (15–17 years) in four time points, according to gender. The data were from 2002, 2005, 20013, and 2017 Special Eurobarometers. Adolescents were categorised as “Inactive” when performing less than 60 min/day of moderate to vigorous PA on average. A χ2 test was used to compare the levels of PIA between survey years. PIA levels between gender were analysed using a Z-score test for two population proportions. PIA levels ranged from 67.2% for boys (59.4% to 71.5%;) to 76.8% for girls (76.0% to 83.4) across the time points. Adjusted standardised residuals revealed a decrease in the observed levels versus the expected for 2005 (whole sample: −4.2; boys: −3.3) and an increase for 2013 (whole sample: +2.9; boys: +2.5). Boys presented lower PIA levels than girls in all years (p ≤ 0.003), but descriptively, the difference progressively decreased (from 18.4% to 11.8%). No significant reductions in PIA levels were observed between 2002 and 2017, and girls reported consistently higher levels of PIA than boys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Injury and Rehabilitation)
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