Special Issue "Environment–Macromycetes (Fungi)–Edible Fungi"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jerzy Falandysz
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Guest Editor
Environment Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, University of Gdańsk, 63 Wita Stwosza Str., 80-308 Gdańsk, Poland
Interests: environmental chemistry; food chemistry and toxicology; mushrooms; halogenated POPs; trace elements; heavy metals; radionuclides
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Roland Treu
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Technology, Athabasca University, Athabasca, Alberta, T9S 3A3, Canada
Interests: mycology; fungal ecology; applied mycology
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ji Zhang
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Medicinal Plants, Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Kunming 650200, China
Interests: ecology; fungi; medicinal plants; element cycling

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Macromycetes are fungi forming fruiting bodies (sporocarps, mushrooms) that are visible to the naked eye. Many macromycetes have been used by humans as a source of food and medicine for thousands of years, and some species played a role in traditional ceremonies, sometimes with spiritual, mind-altering effects. Other species have caused fatal poisonings due to a variety of toxic metabolites produced in the fruiting bodies. Sporocarps of fungi contain numerous biologically active organic compounds as well as secondary products of various natures. In addition, mushrooms contain minerals important to human and animal nutrition as well as potentially toxic metallic and metalloid elements. Many edible species contain selenium, which is an antioxidant that occurs in fungi in a greater concentration than in other foods both of plant or animal origin. Some macromycetes produce sclerotia, consisting of a dense mass of mycelium buried in the substrate and are used in sub-tropical and tropical countries by humans as a food source. Sclerotia of some fungi contain compounds with pharmacological activity and are used in traditional medicines. On the other hand, mycelium is able to efficiently absorb various environmental contaminants including persistent organohalogenated compounds, heavy metals, and radionuclides from the substrate which are subsequently accumulated in their fruiting bodies. In the case of heavy metals, the possible toxicity depends on the species of mushroom as well as on the element biochemistry. Processing and preservation of edible and medicinal mushrooms may change their chemical composition. This Special Issue will present the latest findings in these areas and collate works through an open call to all researchers working in this field who would like to present their work in this dedicated issue.

Prof. Dr. Jerzy Falandysz
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Roland Treu
Assoc. Prof. Ji Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fungal active constituents
  • Minerals
  • Fungi and human health
  • Bioconcentration
  • Element biochemistry
  • Heavy metals
  • Toxins
  • Nuclides
  • Medicinal fungi
  • Functional foods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Polish Wild Mushrooms as Beta-Glucan Sources
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7299; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197299 - 06 Oct 2020
Abstract
Mushroom beta-glucans show immunomodulatory, anticancer and antioxidant features. Numerous papers have been published in the last years on fungal polysaccharides, especially beta-glucans, demonstrating their various biological activities. However substantial data about beta-glucan contents in many mushroom species, especially wild mushrooms, are still missing. [...] Read more.
Mushroom beta-glucans show immunomodulatory, anticancer and antioxidant features. Numerous papers have been published in the last years on fungal polysaccharides, especially beta-glucans, demonstrating their various biological activities. However substantial data about beta-glucan contents in many mushroom species, especially wild mushrooms, are still missing. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to evaluate β-glucans in 18 species of wild mushrooms and three species of commercial mushrooms for comparison purposes. The contents of β-glucans were determined by the Megazyme method and with the Congo red method, which differ in analytical procedure. Among wild mushrooms, the highest mean β-glucan content assessed with the Megazyme method was found in Tricholoma portentosum (34.97 g/100 g DM), whereas with the Congo red method in Lactarius deliciosus (17.11 g/100 g DM) and Suillus grevillei (16.97 g/100 g DM). The β-glucans in wild mushrooms assessed with the Megazyme method were comparable to commercial mushrooms, whereas β-glucans assessed with the Congo red method were generally higher in wild mushrooms, especially in Russula vinosa, L. deliciosus and S. grevillei. This study indicates wild mushrooms as interesting material for β-glucan extraction for food industry and medicinal purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment–Macromycetes (Fungi)–Edible Fungi)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review of the Occurrence of Alpha-Emitting Radionuclides in Wild Mushrooms
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8220; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218220 - 06 Nov 2020
Abstract
Alpha-emitting radioisotopes are the most toxic among all radionuclides. In particular, medium to long-lived isotopes of the heavier metals are of the greatest concern to human health and radiological safety. This review focuses on the most common alpha-emitting radionuclides of natural and anthropogenic [...] Read more.
Alpha-emitting radioisotopes are the most toxic among all radionuclides. In particular, medium to long-lived isotopes of the heavier metals are of the greatest concern to human health and radiological safety. This review focuses on the most common alpha-emitting radionuclides of natural and anthropogenic origin in wild mushrooms from around the world. Mushrooms bio-accumulate a range of mineral ionic constituents and radioactive elements to different extents, and are therefore considered as suitable bio-indicators of environmental pollution. The available literature indicates that the natural radionuclide 210Po is accumulated at the highest levels (up to 22 kBq/kg dry weight (dw) in wild mushrooms from Finland), while among synthetic nuclides, the highest levels of up to 53.8 Bq/kg dw of 239+240Pu were reported in Ukrainian mushrooms. The capacity to retain the activity of individual nuclides varies between mushrooms, which is of particular interest for edible species that are consumed either locally or, in some cases, also traded on an international scale. The effective radiation dose from the ingestion of this food can reportedly range from 0.033 µSv/kg dw to 26.8 mSv/kg and varies depending on the country. Following pollution events, such consumption may expose consumers to highly radiotoxic decay particles produced by alpha emitters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment–Macromycetes (Fungi)–Edible Fungi)
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