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Special Issue "Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors in Pregnancy and Early Childhood"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. How-Ran Chao

Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Emerging Compounds Research Center, National Pingtung University and Science and Technology, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +886 8 7703202x7514
Interests: environmental hygiene and health; environmental epidemiology; environmental toxicology; biomonitoring of human specimens including breast milk, cord blood, and venous blood; health risk assessment of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs); health risk assessment of halogenated persistent organic pollutants (POPs); bioassay for EDCs; monitoring of air hazardous pollutants in indoor and outdoor environment
Guest Editor
Prof. Shu-Li Wang

Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: environmental children’s health with regards to exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) (including polychlorinated dioxins, and biphenyls, perfluoro alkanes, phthalates, toxic metals (i.e., lead, arsenic) and the heath effects on endocrine system, neuro-cognitive and immune functions, and related diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, concerns about the adverse health effects on infants, toddlers, and children, after they are exposed to endocrine disruptors or endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), have steadily increased. Pregnant women, infants, toddlers, and children are the most vulnerable populations. The World Health Organization (WHO) is constantly concerned with children’s environmental health. WHO disseminated various global plans of action for children’s and pregnant women’s health and environment. EDCs, including persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), phthalates, bisphenol-A, nonylphenols, parabens, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), lead, cadmium, and mercury, are mostly man-made or inadvertent pollutants found in several materials or contaminants in food and pharmaceutical and personal products (PPCPs). Prenatal and postnatal exposure to EDCs may cause physiological, developmental, or neurobehavioral damage, alteration of male or female reproductive function, allergy or immune suppression, increased incidence of Gynecologic tumor or hormonally-regulated cancers (i.e., breast, ovarian, testicular and prostate cancer), and alteration of thyroid and sex steroid hormone action. Pregnant women and children are exposed to EDCs through dietary and non-dietary pathways like ingestion of indoor dust and drinking water, inhalation of gas and particulate, and skin absorption. EDCs also can be transferred from the mothers to their offspring via the placenta or breast milk. This Special Issue is focused on mothers’ exposure to EDCs during pregnancy, infants or children with prenatal or postnatal exposure to EDCs, the health effects including diseases associated with EDCs during these periods, monitoring of EDCs in indoor environment for the pregnant women and children, and education or policy for mothers, doctors, nurses, or students with knowledge of pregnancy and childhood exposure to EDCs. Considering the emerging EDCs with possibly negative impact on the developing fetus, the related in vivo studies will also be encouraged in this Special Issue.

Prof. How-Ran Chao
Prof. Shu-Li Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Endocrine disruptors
  • Environmental hormone
  • Developmental deficits
  • Pregnancy
  • Childhood
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Reproduction
  • Immune function
  • Allergy
  • Breast milk
  • Indoor environment
  • Education or policy for EDCs

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Birth Outcomes; An Updated Analysis from the Danish National Birth Cohort
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1832; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091832
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 7 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 24 August 2018
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Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are widespread industrial pollutants that are extremely persistent in the environment. A previous study in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) found prenatal perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) exposure was associated with decreased birth weight, but had insufficient statistical power to evaluate adverse
[...] Read more.
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are widespread industrial pollutants that are extremely persistent in the environment. A previous study in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) found prenatal perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) exposure was associated with decreased birth weight, but had insufficient statistical power to evaluate adverse birth outcomes. Here, we conducted additional analyses in three samples originating from the DNBC for 3535 mothers and infant pairs to evaluate associations between prenatal PFASs exposures and low birth weight and preterm birth. Maternal plasma concentrations were measured for six types of PFASs in early pregnancy. Several PFASs were associated with a reduction in birth weight and gestational age. We estimated a nearly 2-fold increase in risks of preterm birth for the higher quartiles of PFOA and perflourooctanesulfonate (PFOS) exposure. In spline models, risk of preterm birth was increased for perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluoroheptane sulfonate (PFHpS) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) in higher exposure ranges. We also observed some elevated risks for low birth weight but these estimates were less precise. Our findings strengthen the evidence that in-utero PFASs exposures affect fetal growth. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether these associations persist with the decline of PFOA and PFOS in populations and should also investigate newer types of fluorinated compounds introduced more recently. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors in Pregnancy and Early Childhood)
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Open AccessArticle Exposure to Environmental Contaminants and Lung Function in Adolescents—Is There a Link?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1352; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071352
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 15 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
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Abstract
Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF)), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated flame retardants (BDEs) are well known toxic environmental contaminants. Their possible role in the incidence of respiratory disease is not yet well understood. Previous studies showed a negative effect on
[...] Read more.
Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF)), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated flame retardants (BDEs) are well known toxic environmental contaminants. Their possible role in the incidence of respiratory disease is not yet well understood. Previous studies showed a negative effect on lung function in relation to prenatal and lactational dioxin exposure in pre-pubertal children. Effects of BDE exposure on the lung function have not previously been evaluated. As part of a longitudinal cohort study, the effects of perinatal dioxin (PCDD/F) exposure and serum PCDD/F, dl-PCB, and BDE levels on lung function in adolescents were assessed using spirometry, a body box, and diffusion measurements. Thirty-three children (born between 1986 and 1991) consented to the current follow-up study. Prenatal, lactational, and current dioxin, PCB, and BDE concentrations were determined using GC-MS. No relationship was seen between prenatal and lactational dioxin exposure, nor with current PCB body burden, and lung function. Indications of increasing airway obstruction were seen in relation to increasing current BDE exposure. This is a novel finding and certainly warrants further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors in Pregnancy and Early Childhood)
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Open AccessArticle Association between Organochlorine Pesticide Levels in Breast Milk and Their Effects on Female Reproduction in a Taiwanese Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 931; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050931
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 29 April 2018 / Accepted: 30 April 2018 / Published: 7 May 2018
PDF Full-text (830 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Only few studies have focused on organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in breast milk and the related health risks for women in Taiwan. Our goal is to examine breast milk OCPs and their associations with female reproductive function (infertility, gynecological diseases, and menstruation characteristics) as
[...] Read more.
Only few studies have focused on organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in breast milk and the related health risks for women in Taiwan. Our goal is to examine breast milk OCPs and their associations with female reproductive function (infertility, gynecological diseases, and menstruation characteristics) as well as their correlation with sociodemographic parameters (age, pre-pregnant body mass index (BMI), annual incomes, population, birth year, and parity) and dietary habit. The breast milk samples were collected in southern Taiwan (n = 68) from 2013 to 2016 and the OCP residues were analyzed using high resolution gas chromatography with low resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/LRMS). The results show that the most abundant OCP residues in the breast milk was ΣDDT with the geometric mean ± standard deviation of 9.81 ± 7.52 ng−1 lipid−1 followed by ΣHCH (0.539 ± 0.557 ng−1·lipid−1). In the principal component analysis, cis-chlordane (cis-CHL) and γ-HCH were found to be related to participants who received medical treatment for infertility, and 4,4′-DDT was associated with those who received gynecological surgery. The logistic regression showed that the odds ratio (OR) of log γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) was higher for mothers who had received medical treatment for infertility than for the normal group (OR = 25.6, p = 0.035) after adjustments for age, pre-pregnant BMI, annual income, population (i.e., native-born Taiwanese), birth year, and parity. Cow milk and beef consumption as well as menstruation characteristics such as average menstrual period (>5 days), shortest menstrual period (<3 days), and women who had taken hormonal drugs were significantly associated to several OCP residues in the breast milk. In addition, ΣHCH including β-HCH and γ-HCH was correlated with annual family income and gravidity as well as cow milk and beef consumptions. Overall, γ-HCH exhibited a probable association with the infertility diseases of Taiwanese women, and dietary habit might play an important role in the female Taiwanese exposure to OCPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors in Pregnancy and Early Childhood)
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Review

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Open AccessReview The Effect of Bisphenol A on Puberty: A Critical Review of the Medical Literature
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1044; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091044
Received: 23 August 2017 / Revised: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 8 September 2017 / Published: 10 September 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (367 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many scientific studies have revealed a trend towards an earlier onset of puberty and have disclosed an increasing number of children that display precocious puberty. As an explanation, some authors have considered the global socio-economic improvement across different populations, and other authors have
[...] Read more.
Many scientific studies have revealed a trend towards an earlier onset of puberty and have disclosed an increasing number of children that display precocious puberty. As an explanation, some authors have considered the global socio-economic improvement across different populations, and other authors have considered the action of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Among these, bisphenol A (BPA), an aromatic compound largely used worldwide as a precursor of some plastics and chemical additives, is well known for its molecular oestrogen-like and obesogenic actions. We reviewed the medical literature of the previous 20 years that examined associations between BPA exposure and the age of puberty in humans, considering only those referring to clinical or epidemiological data. Of 19 studies, only 7 showed a correlation between BPA and puberty. In particular, the possible disruptive role of BPA on puberty may be seen in those with central precocious puberty or isolated premature breast development aged 2 months to 4 years old, even if the mechanism is undefined. Some studies also found a close relationship between urinary BPA, body weight, and early puberty, which can be explained by the obesogenic effect of BPA itself. The currently available data do not allow establishment of a clear role for BPA in pubertal development because of the conflicting results among all clinical and epidemiological studies examined. Further research is needed to fully understand the potential role of exposure to EDCs and their adverse endocrine health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors in Pregnancy and Early Childhood)
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