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Special Issue "Community Influences in Young Children & Adolescents"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Katherine P. Theall
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University 1440 Canal St., Mailcode 8319, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Julia Fleckman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University 1440 Canal St., Mailcode 8319, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
Dr. M. Pia Chaparro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University 1440 Canal St., Mailcode 8319, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on the impact of community conditions on the health and well-being of children and adolescents in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information about the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph

While health inequities are often noted among adult populations, the root of adult inequities likely lie early in development, as variations in health status have been observed in young children and adolescents. Differential exposure to physical, social, and psychosocial stressors likely play an important role in producing and maintaining health and social inequities by socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and immigrant status globally. Despite the growth in empirical research on community characteristics and their influence on children’s and adolescent health and development, much remains to be learned, particularly on the mechanisms through which community characteristics may impact outcomes. Community is often broadly defined, representing not only the residential neighborhood community, but family, school, and other social communities (e.g., social media) that may impact young children and adolescents. Research in this area can offer a critical guide for policy efforts and planning for public health. This issue aims to highlight problems and solutions to community influences on young children’s and adolescent health, behavior, development, and well-being in both high- and low-resource settings. 

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the impacts of community factors or the intersection of community factors on health, behavior, development, and well-being of young children and adolescents. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Katherine P. Theall
Dr. Julia Fleckman
Dr. M. Pia Chaparro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Community
  • Family
  • Neighborhood
  • Built environment
  • Social environment
  • Educational or school environment
  • Norms
  • Social media
  • Life course and development
  • Equity
  • Disparities
  • Community-based research and practice

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Health, Neighborhoods, and School Readiness from the Parent Perspective: A Qualitative Study of Contextual and Socio-Emotional Factors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9350; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179350 - 04 Sep 2021
Viewed by 394
Abstract
The objective of this qualitative study was to address existing gaps in the literature by gathering parent perspectives on both health and school readiness in regard to neighborhood context, specifically parents’ perceived level of neighborhood safety and support, on physical health and the [...] Read more.
The objective of this qualitative study was to address existing gaps in the literature by gathering parent perspectives on both health and school readiness in regard to neighborhood context, specifically parents’ perceived level of neighborhood safety and support, on physical health and the behavioral and cognitive domains of school readiness. Focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 parents or caregivers whose children attended Early Head Start/Head Start Centers or who received Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) services in New Orleans, Louisiana during fall 2015. Parents discussed concepts of school readiness, neighborhood, the intersection between the two, and parental stress; however, few expressed a clear connection between their concerns about safety, their own stress, and their child’s readiness for school. Disparities in both health and school readiness exist between both racial and socioeconomic groups in the United States, and this study offers a unique and enhanced understanding of the impact of non-academic factors on the well-being and development of young children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Influences in Young Children & Adolescents)
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