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Special Issue "COVID-19 Driven Innovations for Inclusion and Sustainability"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 1585

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Catherine Holloway
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UCLIC, University College London, 66–72 Gower Street, London WC1E 6EA, UK
Interests: assistive technology; disability; innovation; systems thinking; interaction design; human-computer interaction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mikaela Patrick
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Global Disability Innovation Hub, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: inclusion; sustainability; healthy inequity; social justice; built environment; inclusive design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

COVID-19 has demonstrated the breadth of exclusion faced by minorities globally and the impacts of the environments we live in on population health. We have seen people with disabilities and older populations disproportionately affected by the global crisis. Similarly, black and ethnic minorities in majority white populations have been further left behind by the global pandemic. At the same time, we have seen disruption across global supply chains of health and environmental products as well as infrastructures that are needed to keep people safe and well. However, we have also seen solutions that leverage advances in novel manufacturing methods and supply chain improvements that have validated new ways of delivering healthcare. If we are to build back fairer, then we need to ensure future medical supply chains are robust and services are accessible to all even when delivered remotely. This Special Issue seeks to learn from innovative approaches to inclusion and sustainability that have been accelerated by or originated from the COVID-19 crisis. Papers addressing how the pandemic has affected marginalized communities in accessing healthcare and how novel approaches have been trialed to increase the inclusion and/or sustainability of solutions are invited for consideration. We welcome papers focused on subjects adjacent to healthcare technology, such as those that address demand by reducing stigma or novel approaches to ensure inclusion (e.g., campaigns) and sustainability (e.g., local production of assistive technology).

Prof. Dr. Catherine Holloway
Dr. Mikaela Patrick
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • elder care
  • health inequalities
  • health and well-being
  • assistive technology
  • disability
  • assistive devices
  • support services
  • inclusion
  • digital health
  • ageing in place

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Utilization of Mind–Body Intervention for Integrative Health Care of COVID-19 Patients and Survivors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6618; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116618 - 29 May 2022
Viewed by 936
Abstract
Recent findings suggest a correlation between COVID-19 and diabetes, although the underlying causes are still little understood. COVID-19 infection tends to induce severe symptoms in patients with underlying diabetes, increasing their mortality rate. Moreover, COVID-19 itself appears to be a diabetogenic factor. In [...] Read more.
Recent findings suggest a correlation between COVID-19 and diabetes, although the underlying causes are still little understood. COVID-19 infection tends to induce severe symptoms in patients with underlying diabetes, increasing their mortality rate. Moreover, COVID-19 itself appears to be a diabetogenic factor. In addition, mental health conditions, such as depression due to lockdown and anxiety about infection, were found to affect glycemic control and immunity, highlighting the importance of mental health care during the pandemic. Mind–Body Intervention (MBI), which includes meditation, yoga, and qigong, has emerged as a tool for mental health management due to its effects on stress reduction and the promotion of mental and physical well-being. Here, we review the latest randomized controlled trials to determine the effects of MBI on glycemic control and the immune system and discuss the underlying mechanisms by which MBI facilitates the virtuous cycle of stress management, glycemic control, and immune modulation. Furthermore, we examine the actual utilization of MBI during the COVID-19 pandemic era through recent studies. With proper online education, non-pharmacological MBI may be more widely used as an important tool for self-health care that complements the usual treatment of COVID-19 patients and survivors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 Driven Innovations for Inclusion and Sustainability)
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