Special Issue "Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases: From Individual to Society"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Aziz Rahman
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Healthcare Professions, Federation University Australia, Berwick, VIC 3806, Australia
Interests: public health; health promotion; tobacco/smoking; non-communicable diseases; global burden of diseases; disadvantaged population

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Two-thirds of annual deaths around the world are due to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which is equivalent to 41 million people per year. The latest data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study showed that ischemic heart disease was the leading cause of mortality at an early age. The burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is quite high in developed countries and the leading causes of early deaths and disabilities in those countries are ischemic heart disease, low back pain, stroke, lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Due to epidemiological transition, developing countries are also having a double burden of diseases with both communicable and NCDs. It is projected that by 2040, seven out of top ten diseases will be NCDs causing early deaths and disability around the world. Both metabolic and behavioural factors, most of which are modifiable, are the primary risk factors for NCDs.

The burden of NCDs can be reduced at both individual and societal levels. In addition to improving awareness through varied health promotion activities, addressing modifiable risk factors, detecting high risk groups and organising screening, treatment and palliative care could be the ways to address NCDs. Evidence leading to addressing risk factors and the burden of NCDs is required from different settings and countries.

This Special Issue seeks papers on risk factors, prevention, interventions and health outcomes for NCDs at individual, patient or population levels from both developed and developing countries. In addition to primary data, secondary data and scoping reviews will also be considered.

Dr. Aziz Rahman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Noncommunicable diseases
  • Risk factors
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Chronic respiratory illness
  • Smoking
  • Physical activity
  • Sedentary behaviour
  • Lifestyle
  • Metabolic
  • Diet
  • Chronic diseases
  • Health promotion

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Benefits of Brief Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Reducing Diabetes-Related Distress and HbA1c in Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients in Thailand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5564; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155564 - 01 Aug 2020
Abstract
This study evaluated the short-term efficacy of brief group cognitive behavioral therapy (BG-CBT) in reducing diabetes-related distress (DRD), lowering hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), improving food consumption behavior, increasing physical activity, and improving medication adherence behavior. A quasi-experimental pretest/post-test design with follow-up assessments was used [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the short-term efficacy of brief group cognitive behavioral therapy (BG-CBT) in reducing diabetes-related distress (DRD), lowering hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), improving food consumption behavior, increasing physical activity, and improving medication adherence behavior. A quasi-experimental pretest/post-test design with follow-up assessments was used with an experimental and a control group. Participants were patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and moderate or high diabetes-related distress recruited from the Diabetes Mellitus Clinic of Hang Dong Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Fifty-six eligible participants were purposively selected and enrolled, then randomly assigned to either the BG-CBT group or the control group. The BG-CBT group received six brief weekly sessions of cognitive behavioral group therapy, while the control group received conventional care. Baseline data were collected at week 0 (pretest) and at week 6 (post-test), including food consumption behavior, physical activity, and adherence to medication regimes, as well as a blood examination to determine levels of HbA1c at the week 12 follow-up. DRD was assessed using the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS-17) and analyzed using descriptive statistics, including pair t-test and independence t-test results. The BG-CBT had a significant effect on the amelioration of diabetes distress, improvement of food consumption behavior, and reduction of HbA1c levels, demonstrating the effectiveness of BG-CBT in maintaining diabetes control in people with T2DM-related distress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases: From Individual to Society)
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Open AccessArticle
Associations between Intrinsic Heart Rate, P Wave and QT Interval Durations and Pulse Wave Analysis in Patients with Hypertension and High Normal Blood Pressure
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4350; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124350 - 17 Jun 2020
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the relationship between electrocardiographic (ECG) and pulse wave analysis variables in patients with hypertension (HT) and high normal blood pressure (HNBP). A total of 56 consecutive, middle-aged hypertensive and HNBP patients underwent pulse wave analysis and standard [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to explore the relationship between electrocardiographic (ECG) and pulse wave analysis variables in patients with hypertension (HT) and high normal blood pressure (HNBP). A total of 56 consecutive, middle-aged hypertensive and HNBP patients underwent pulse wave analysis and standard 12-lead ECG. Pulse wave velocity (PWV), heart rate, intrinsic heart rate (IHR), P wave and QT interval durations were as follows: 7.26 ± 0.69 m/s, 69 ± 11 beats/minute, 91 ± 3 beats/minute, 105 ± 22 mm and 409 ± 64 mm, respectively. Significant correlations were obtained between PWV and IHR and P wave duration, respectively, between early vascular aging (EVA) and P wave and QT interval durations, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed significant associations between ECG and pulse wave analysis variables but multiple regression analysis revealed only IHR as an independent predictor of PWV, even after adjusting for blood pressure variables and therapy. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed P wave duration (area under curve (AUC) = 0.731; 95% CI: 0.569–0.893) as a predictor of pathological PWV, and P wave and QT interval durations were found as sensitive and specific predictors of EVA. ECG provides information about PWV and EVA in patients with HT and HNBP. IHR and P wave durations are independent predictors of PWV, and P wave and QT interval may predict EVA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases: From Individual to Society)
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Open AccessArticle
Dietary Patterns and Associated Factors Among Adolescents in Malaysia: Findings from Adolescent Nutrition Survey 2017
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3431; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103431 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
Balanced diet in the early stages of life plays a role in optimum growth and maintains good health status of adolescents. Dietary habits that are established during adolescence will sustain till adulthood. Therefore, this present study aims to identify the dietary patterns and [...] Read more.
Balanced diet in the early stages of life plays a role in optimum growth and maintains good health status of adolescents. Dietary habits that are established during adolescence will sustain till adulthood. Therefore, this present study aims to identify the dietary patterns and to determine factors associated with dietary patterns in terms of socio-demographic characteristics, locality of schools, ethnicity, eating habits, self-perceived weight status, and food label reading habit among adolescents in Malaysia. Data from the Adolescent Nutrition Survey (ANS) 2017 was used for the present study. ANS is a population representative school-based cross-sectional study among school-going adolescents from primary four to secondary five from schools in 13 states and three federal territories registered under the Ministry of Education Malaysia. A self-administrated questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-demographic characteristics, locality of schools, ethnicity, eating habits, self-perceived weight status, and food label reading habit. A pre-tested face-to-face food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to collect information on food group intake frequency. Dietary patterns were identified by using exploratory factor analysis and associated factors, using complex sample general linear model (GLM) analysis. All statistical analyses were carried out at 95% confidence interval or p-value < 0.05. The dietary patterns identified are healthy, unhealthy, and alternative proteins. The healthy dietary pattern was significantly associated with the types of school and ethnicity. The unhealthy dietary pattern was significantly associated with the locality of schools, ethnicity, frequency of snacks intake per week, frequency of eating out per week, self-perceived weight status, and food label reading habit. Significant associations were found between alternative proteins dietary pattern and locality of schools, ethnicity, and types of school. This study found that there is a disparity of dietary patterns between different ethnicity, locality of schools, and types of school. We recommend strategies of specifying ethnicity and geographical area to improve dietary patterns of adolescents in Malaysia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases: From Individual to Society)
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Open AccessArticle
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Related Distress in Thailand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072329 - 30 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate prevalence and factors potentially associated with diabetes-related distress (DRD) among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in a primary health care center in Thailand. This cross-sectional study was conducted with a total of 370 patients with T2DM. Data [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate prevalence and factors potentially associated with diabetes-related distress (DRD) among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in a primary health care center in Thailand. This cross-sectional study was conducted with a total of 370 patients with T2DM. Data were collected at primary health care centers in Hang Dong District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. DRD was assessed using the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS-17). The association between sociodemographic characteristics and other factors with DRD was analyzed using the Fisher t-test, Chi-square test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. The association between Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and DRD was analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis. The participants had a mean age of 60.95 ± 7.96, and most were female (68.1%). Of the participants with DRD, 8.9% had moderate to high levels of distress. Education level and family support were significantly associated with the overall level of DRD. Additionally, HbA1c and co-morbidity were also significantly associated with DRD, as were emotional burden and regimen distress. Multiple linear regression analysis found that increased HbA1c was positively associated with increased DRD after adjusting for age, sex, education, duration of T2DM, co-morbidity, diabetic complications, and family support. Screening with DRD may be beneficial in T2DM patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases: From Individual to Society)
Open AccessArticle
Trends in Suicide Mortality in South Africa, 1997 to 2016
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 1850; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061850 - 12 Mar 2020
Abstract
Suicide rates worldwide are declining; however, less is known about the patterns and trends in mortality from suicide in sub-Saharan Africa. This study evaluates trends in suicide rates and years of potential life lost from death registration data in South Africa from 1997 [...] Read more.
Suicide rates worldwide are declining; however, less is known about the patterns and trends in mortality from suicide in sub-Saharan Africa. This study evaluates trends in suicide rates and years of potential life lost from death registration data in South Africa from 1997 to 2016. Suicide (X60–X84 and Y87) was coded using the 10th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Changes in mortality rate trends were analysed using joinpoint regression analysis. The 20-year study examines 8573 suicides in South Africa, comprising 0.1% of all deaths involving persons 15 years and older. Rates of suicide per 100,000 population were 2.07 in men and 0.49 in women. Joinpoint regression analyses showed that, while the overall mortality rate for male suicides remained stable, mortality rates due to hanging and poisoning increased by 3.9% and 3.5% per year, respectively. Female suicide mortality rates increased by 12.6% from 1997 to 2004 before stabilising; while rates due to hanging increased by 3.0% per year. The average annual YPLL due to suicide was 9559 in men and 2612 in women. The results show that suicide contributes substantially to premature death and demonstrates the need for targeted interventions, especially among young men in South Africa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases: From Individual to Society)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Correlation of Mortality Burdens of Cerebrovascular Disease and Diabetes Mellitus with Domestic Consumption of Soya and Palm Oils
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5410; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155410 - 28 Jul 2020
Abstract
Background: Cerebrovascular diseases (CBVDs) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are interrelated and cumbersome global health burdens. However, the relationship between edible oils consumption and mortality burdens of CBVDs and DM has not yet been evaluated. This review aims to explore correlations between per capita [...] Read more.
Background: Cerebrovascular diseases (CBVDs) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are interrelated and cumbersome global health burdens. However, the relationship between edible oils consumption and mortality burdens of CBVDs and DM has not yet been evaluated. This review aims to explore correlations between per capita mortality burdens of CBVDs and DM, as well as food consumption of palm or soya oils in 11 randomly selected countries in 2005, 2010, and 2016. Methods: After obtaining data on food consumption of palm and soya oils and mortality burdens of CBVDs and DM, correlations between the consumption of oils and mortality burdens of diseases were explored. Results: There was a positive correlation between the consumption of soya oil with the mortality burden of CBVDs in Australia, Switzerland, and Indonesia, as well as the mortality burden of DM in the USA. The consumption of palm oil had a positive correlation with the mortality burden of DM in Jordan only. Conclusions: Food consumption of soya oil in several countries possibly contributes to the mortality burden of CBVDs or DM more than food consumption of palm oil, which could be a possible risk factor in the mortality burdens of CBVDs and DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases: From Individual to Society)
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