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2nd Edition: Diabetes in Sports and Exercise Medicine

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 8896

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Health & Sport Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
Interests: clinical exercise physiology; accelerometry; community-based interventions; metabolic syndrome
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thank you for your great support of our last Special Issue on “Diabetes in Sports and Exercise Medicine” (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/Diabetes_Sport_Medicine). Considering its importance, the journal requested the organization of a second edition of this topic.

In this Special Issue, we aim to maintain the focus on exercise and physical activity in diabetes, and welcome papers covering a broad overview of exercise-related topics. These range from short-term effects of exercise to using daily activity measurements as vital signs in diabetes care centers, the health and fitness benefits of resistance and aerobic exercise training, exercise prescription as a form of complementary medicine, as well as the challenges faced by children and/or adults regarding exercise programming at the community level. Our goal is to cover a broad range of diabetes research, including all forms of diabetes mellitus across all life spans.

Dr. Jason R. Jaggers
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • clinical exercise physiology
  • fitness
  • pediatric endocrinology
  • accelerometry
  • sport medicine
  • prediabetes
  • type 1 diabetes
  • type 2 diabetes
  • alternative therapy
  • exercise prescription

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 2164 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Starting Blood Glucose Levels on Serum Electrolyte Concentrations during and after Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes
by Zeinab Momeni, Normand G. Boulé, Carla M. Prado, Heather A. Hinz and Jane E. Yardley
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2109; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032109 - 24 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Fear of hypoglycemia is a major exercise barrier for people with type 1 diabetes (PWT1D). Consequently, although guidelines recommend starting exercise with blood glucose (BG) concentration at 7–10 mmol/L, PWT1D often start higher, potentially affecting hydration and serum electrolyte concentrations. To test this, [...] Read more.
Fear of hypoglycemia is a major exercise barrier for people with type 1 diabetes (PWT1D). Consequently, although guidelines recommend starting exercise with blood glucose (BG) concentration at 7–10 mmol/L, PWT1D often start higher, potentially affecting hydration and serum electrolyte concentrations. To test this, we examined serum and urine electrolyte concentrations during aerobic exercise (cycling 45 min at 60%VO2peak) in 12 PWT1D (10F/2M, mean ± SEM: age 29 ± 2.3 years, VO2peak 37.9 ± 2.2 mL·kg−1·min−1) with starting BG levels: 8–10 (MOD), and 12–14 (HI) mmol/L. Age, sex, and fitness-matched controls without diabetes (CON) completed one exercise session with BG in the normal physiological range. Serum glucose was significantly higher during exercise and recovery in HI versus MOD (p = 0.0002 and p < 0.0001, respectively) and in MOD versus CON (p < 0.0001). During exercise and recovery, MOD and HI were not significantly different in serum insulin (p = 0.59 and p = 0.63), sodium (p = 0.058 and p = 0.08), potassium (p = 0.17 and p = 0.16), calcium (p = 0.75 and 0.19), and magnesium p = 0.24 and p = 0.09). Our findings suggest that exercise of moderate intensity and duration with higher BG levels may not pose an immediate risk to hydration or serum electrolyte concentrations for PWT1D. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Diabetes in Sports and Exercise Medicine)
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9 pages, 639 KiB  
Article
Association between Intensity Levels of Physical Activity and Glucose Variability among Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes
by Jason R. Jaggers, Kristi M. King, Timothy McKay, Ryan J. Dyess, Bradly J. Thrasher and Kupper A. Wintergerst
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1623; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021623 - 16 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1734
Abstract
Studies would indicate a reduction in hemoglobin A1c levels following moderate and/or vigorous physical activity (PA) for people managing diabetes. However, prior investigations rarely looked at glucose variability in an adolescent population. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to test the relationship [...] Read more.
Studies would indicate a reduction in hemoglobin A1c levels following moderate and/or vigorous physical activity (PA) for people managing diabetes. However, prior investigations rarely looked at glucose variability in an adolescent population. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to test the relationship between physical activity intensity levels and glucose variability in a sample of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and if the amount of time accumulated for each intensity level is predictive of changes in glucose variability. Methods: Glucose variability was determined using continuous glucose monitor data and physical activity intensity time was retrieved through Fitabase®. Both glucose and physical activity data were collected over a two-week timeframe. Data analysis was completed using Pearson’s correlation and a simple linear regression with a p-value of 0.05 to determine significance. Results: A significant inverse relationship was observed (p = 0.04) between glucose variability and average minutes of daily moderate-intensity activity (r = −0.59), as well as moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) combined (r = −0.86; p = 0.03). A simple linear regression indicated that only MVPA was a significant predictor of glucose variability (β = −0.12; 95% CI: −0.23–−0.01, p = 0.03). Conclusion: These data demonstrated that the total amount of daily physical activity is important when properly managing type 1 diabetes mellitus, but time spent in MVPA over two weeks may have an inverse relationship with glucose variability in children and adolescents over a span of two weeks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Diabetes in Sports and Exercise Medicine)
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Review

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14 pages, 1049 KiB  
Review
Type 1 Diabetes and the Menstrual Cycle: Where/How Does Exercise Fit in?
by Saru Toor, Jane E. Yardley and Zeinab Momeni
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2772; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042772 - 4 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5026
Abstract
Regular exercise is associated with substantial health benefits for individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the fear of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) due to activity-induced declines in blood glucose levels acts as a major barrier to partaking in exercise in this population. [...] Read more.
Regular exercise is associated with substantial health benefits for individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the fear of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) due to activity-induced declines in blood glucose levels acts as a major barrier to partaking in exercise in this population. For females with T1D, hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle and their effects on blood glucose levels can act as an additional barrier. The impact that these cyclic changes may have on blood glucose and insulin needs and the consequent risk of hypoglycemia during or after exercise are still unknown in this population. Therefore, in this narrative review, we gathered existing knowledge about the menstrual cycle in T1D and the effects of different cyclic phases on substrate metabolism and glucose response to exercise in females with T1D to increase knowledge and understanding around exercise in this underrepresented population. This increased knowledge in such an understudied area can help to better inform exercise guidelines for females with T1D. It can also play an important role in eliminating a significant barrier to exercise in this population, which has the potential to increase activity, improve mental health and quality of life, and decrease the risk of diabetes-related complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Diabetes in Sports and Exercise Medicine)
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