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Lifestyle Behaviors and Health Promotion in Young People

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 2628

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Health Sciences Center, State University of Northern Parana, Jacarezinho 86400-000, Brazil
Interests: health behaviors; health education; health promotion; cardiometabolic health; physical activity; sedentary behavior; sleep; eating habits; children; adolescents; young adults
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Healthy lifestyle promotion is recognized as an important determinant of health status. It is estimated that up to 60% of the quality of life depends on actions linked to health promotion and lifestyle behaviors, such as physical activity, sedentary behavior, eating habits, sleep, alcohol consumption, smoking and substance abuse. In this context, healthy lifestyles fundamentally depend on the early adoption of health habits. In fact, more harmful habits adopted by adults are strongly linked to unhealthy behaviors stemming from young ages. Reports indicate that half of preventable premature deaths may be associated with unhealthy habits incorporated in childhood and adolescence. Despite the difficulty in modifying unhealthy habits that adults adopt during childhood and adolescence, many harmful effects of risk behaviors identified at this age could be minimized or avoided if these behaviors were identified and modified at an early stage. In general, it has been suggested that healthy behavior established at a young age can help identify health status and the risks of presenting chronic non-communicable diseases later in life. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the lifestyle components of young people in order to promote their present and future health. We are particularly interested in novel multi-behavioral interventions that target these outcomes within young people from different cultures and regions of the world. We also welcome observational studies examining longitudinal, moderated and mediated relationships. Other manuscript types accepted include systematic reviews, meta-analysis and methodological papers.

Prof. Dr. Dartagnan Pinto Guedes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health behaviors
  • health outcome
  • health-promoting behaviors
  • physical activity
  • nutrition
  • lifestyle interventions
  • disease prevention
  • children
  • adolescents
  • young adults

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 566 KiB  
Article
Health-Related Lifestyles among University Students: Focusing on Eating Habits and Physical Activity
by Elena Lonati, Emanuela Cazzaniga, Roberta Adorni, Francesco Zanatta, Michael Belingheri, Matteo Colleoni, Michele Augusto Riva, Patrizia Steca and Paola Palestini
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(5), 626; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21050626 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 460
Abstract
The transition to higher education at University is a critical moment for young adults to acquire unhealthy habits regarding physical activity (PA) and adherence to a healthy diet. Negative behaviors might be maintained in the years to come with a major risk of [...] Read more.
The transition to higher education at University is a critical moment for young adults to acquire unhealthy habits regarding physical activity (PA) and adherence to a healthy diet. Negative behaviors might be maintained in the years to come with a major risk of suffering from a Non-Communicable Disease. This study aims to determine the relationship between diet and PA in the student community of University of Milano-Bicocca. Students between 18 and 30 years old completed an online survey (6949 students). Two analyses of covariance (ANCOVA), chi-square tests of independence, and a binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the relationship between adequacy of food consumption and PA, in association also with sociodemographic characteristics. Data show a strong correlation between behaviors analyzed, with a proportional positive association between PA and healthy diet. Nevertheless, a third of the sample students incur in incorrect habits for both diet and PA. Further, students performing intensive PA have the healthiest food consumption in general but the worst red meat and pork intake. Accordingly, men practice more PA but have a less adequate diet, exactly contrary to women. In conclusion, policies promoting consciousness of well-being would transform Universities into healthy hubs for virtuous habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle Behaviors and Health Promotion in Young People)
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14 pages, 918 KiB  
Article
Trends in Health-Risk Behaviors and Psychological Distress among Australian First-Year University Students
by Alison Knapp, Tracy Burrows, Megan Whatnall, Lucy Leigh, Sarah Leask and Melinda Hutchesson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(5), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21050620 - 14 May 2024
Viewed by 531
Abstract
University students are recognized as a high-risk population group who experience greater rates of poor health outcomes and mental ill-health. Commencing university is recognized as a major life transition, where students experience new financial, academic, environmental, and social pressures that can cause changes [...] Read more.
University students are recognized as a high-risk population group who experience greater rates of poor health outcomes and mental ill-health. Commencing university is recognized as a major life transition, where students experience new financial, academic, environmental, and social pressures that can cause changes in their normal behaviors. This study explored trends in health-risk behaviors and psychological distress in commencing university students over four survey years. First-year undergraduate students, aged 17–24, from an Australian university were included. A secondary analysis was performed on data collected via cross-sectional surveys on four occasions (2016, 2017, 2019, 2020). Crude logistic regression models were utilized to investigate the association between meeting guidelines and survey year. Odds ratios for the pairwise comparison between each year are reported. In this analysis, 1300 (2016), 484 (2017), 456 (2019), and 571 (2020) students were included. Analyses showed two clear trends: students’ probability of being at high/very high risk of psychological distress (35–55%) and consuming breakfast daily (44–55%) consistently worsened over the four survey years. These findings suggest that the odds of psychological distress and daily breakfast consumption worsened over time, whilst the proportion of students engaging in some health-risk behaviors was high, highlighting the importance of early intervention during the transition to university. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle Behaviors and Health Promotion in Young People)
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16 pages, 370 KiB  
Article
Prevalence and Correlates of Health Risk Behaviors among University Students from a State in the Southern Region of Brazil
by Dartagnan Pinto Guedes, Keila Aparecida de Lima and Andre Luis dos Santos Silva
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(5), 612; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21050612 - 11 May 2024
Viewed by 575
Abstract
Background: Surveys conducted in different regions of the world show that the prevalence rates of health risk behaviors (HRBs) in university students are sometimes higher than those found in non-university populations. This study aims to identify the prevalence rates and demographic and academic [...] Read more.
Background: Surveys conducted in different regions of the world show that the prevalence rates of health risk behaviors (HRBs) in university students are sometimes higher than those found in non-university populations. This study aims to identify the prevalence rates and demographic and academic environment correlates associated with HRBs among Brazilian university students. Methods: In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, a random sample of 5310 university students answered an online questionnaire, with demographic (sex, age, skin color, marital status, and paid work) and academic setting information (housing type, size of campus, year, and shift of study), as well as items clustered in four HRB domains: personal safety and violence, sexual behavior and contraception, addictive substance use, eating habits, physical activity, and sleep. The data were analyzed statistically using bivariate analysis and hierarchical multiple regression. Results: The highest prevalence rates occurred in HRBs clustered in the domain of eating habits, physical activity, and sleep (>60%), while HRBs for personal security and violence were less prevalent (<15%). From 15% to 35% of university students assumed HRBs regarding addictive substance use, and approximately 50% reported risky sexual behavior. The university students most susceptible to HRBs were men, aged ≥ 22 years, living far from their family, studying on larger campuses, attending night classes, and with two or more years of study at the university. Conclusion: The findings suggest that policies and interventions in the university context aimed at students’ readiness to engage in a healthy lifestyle should target specific correlates associated with HRBs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle Behaviors and Health Promotion in Young People)

Review

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26 pages, 994 KiB  
Review
Health-Related Physical Fitness Evaluation in HIV-Diagnosed Children and Adolescents: A Scoping Review
by João Antônio Chula de Castro, Tiago Rodrigues de Lima and Diego Augusto Santos Silva
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(5), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21050541 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 709
Abstract
Background: Health-related physical fitness has been widely used to investigate the adverse effects of HIV infection/ART in children and adolescents. However, methods/protocols and cut-points applied for investigating health-related physical fitness are not clear. The aim of this scoping review was to map the [...] Read more.
Background: Health-related physical fitness has been widely used to investigate the adverse effects of HIV infection/ART in children and adolescents. However, methods/protocols and cut-points applied for investigating health-related physical fitness are not clear. The aim of this scoping review was to map the literature to identify gaps in knowledge regarding the methods/protocols and cut-points. Methods: A scoping review, following the Joana Briggs Institute (JBI) guidelines, was conducted through ten major databases. Search followed the PCC strategy to construct block of terms related to population (children and adolescents), concept (health-related physical fitness components) and context (HIV infection). Results: The search resulted in 7545 studies. After duplicate removal, titles and abstracts reading and full text assessment, 246 studies were included in the scoping review. Body composition was the most investigated component (n = 244), followed by muscular strength/endurance (n = 23), cardiorespiratory fitness (n = 15) and flexibility (n = 4). The World Health Organization growth curves, and nationals’ surveys were the most reference values applied to classify body composition (n = 149), followed by internal cut-points (n = 30) and cut-points developed through small populations (n = 16). Cardiorespiratory fitness was classified through cut-points from three different assessment batteries, as well as cut-points developed through studies with small populations, muscular strength/endurance and flexibility were classified through the same cut-points from five different assessment batteries. Conclusions: The research on muscular strength/endurance, cardiorespiratory fitness and flexibility has been scarcely explored. The lack of studies that investigated method usability as well as reference values was evidenced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle Behaviors and Health Promotion in Young People)
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