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Advances in Mental Health and Well-Being at the Workplace

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6315

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department for Public Health, Health Services Research and HTA, UMIT—Private University for Health Sciences and Health Technology, 6060 Hall in Tirol, Austria
Interests: health sciences; workplace health management; workplace health promotion; health behavior; leadership and health; diffusion of health-related knowledge; health literacy; management; organizational behavior; strategic management; leadership; marketing of services; societal interpretation of organizations; organizational change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Many organizations engage in activities to promote the well-being of their staff [1,2]. The importance of employee health has long been known and received additional emphasis during the pandemic [3–6]. Stress and strain levels in many industries surged due to massive demand, while mental burdens increased due to job insecurities in others, often in combination with additional pressures, e.g., due to (home-office)work–family conflicts; home-schooling duties, inadequate housing; health challenges; loss of loved ones and/or colleagues; and insufficient access to health care, including mental health services.  

Numerous companies and organizations went the extra mile and created innovative health promotion initiatives, which can now serve as best practice examples for a new normal. Some, for example, successfully created or shifted to providing more digitally based offers. However, not all organizations did or could react immediately, and they must intensify their efforts now, while new challenges and global insecurities arise. Resilience demands were and still are unequally distributed among individuals, organizations, and industries.

This Special Issue of IJERPH invites research that makes new contributions to the promotion of mental health and well-being at the workplace. It seeks scholarly work that adds significantly to the knowledge base, e.g., by a focus on emerging topics in mental health and wellbeing at the workplace, an emphasis on industries and jobs or job types that are currently underrepresented in research, the investigation of changes in workplaces that result in the need for innovative approaches in mental health promotion, or successful examples of implementing these. Moreover, articles are welcome that critically engage in discussing the role organizations should (or not) play in mental health promotion at the workplace, and why.

Contributions to this Special Issue must be in the form of an original research article (quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-method), conceptual paper, or review.

[1] Mazzola, J. J.; Jackson, A. T.; Thiele, A. Obesity in the Workplace: a Systematic Review of Barriers and Facilitators to Healthy Lifestyles. Occup. Health Sci. 2019, 3, 239–264.

[2] van der Put, A. C.; Mandemakers, J. J.; de Wit, J. B. F.; van der Lippe, T. Actions Speak Louder Than Words: Workplace Social Relations and Worksite Health Promotion Use. Journal of occupational and environmental medicine, 2021, 63, 614–621.

[3] Dooris, M.; Baybutt, M. The centrality of the settings approach in building back better and fairer. Int. J. Health Promot. Educ.  2021, 59, 195–197.

[4] Gorgenyi-Hegyes, E.; Nathan, R. J.;  Fekete-Farkas, M. Workplace health promotion, employee wellbeing and loyalty during COVID-19 Pandemic—Large scale empirical evidence from Hungary. Econ.  2021, 9, 55.

[5] Kinman, G.; Teoh, K.;  Harriss, A. Supporting the well-being of healthcare workers during and after COVID-19. Occup. Med. 2020, 70, 294–296.

[6] Ngoc Su, D.; Luc Tra, D.; Thi Huynh, H. M.; Nguyen, H. H. T.; O’Mahony, B. Enhancing resilience in the Covid-19 crisis: lessons from human resource management practices in Vietnam. Curr. Issues Tour.  2021, 24, 3189–3205.

Dr. Elisabeth Nöhammer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • workplace health promotion
  • workplace health management
  • mental health
  • psycho-social interventions
  • well-being
  • innovative approaches in workplace well-being
  • resilience

Published Papers (3 papers)

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13 pages, 1252 KiB  
Article
From Housewives to Employees, the Mental Benefits of Employment across Women with Different Gender Role Attitudes and Parenthood Status
by Zhuofei Lu, Shuo Yan, Jeff Jones, Yucheng He and Qigen She
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4364; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054364 - 28 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1758
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that paid employment can improve workers’ mental health status by offering a series of manifest and latent benefits (i.e., income, self-achievement and social engagement), which motivates policymakers’ ongoing promotion of labour force participation as an approach to protect women’s mental [...] Read more.
Previous studies suggest that paid employment can improve workers’ mental health status by offering a series of manifest and latent benefits (i.e., income, self-achievement and social engagement), which motivates policymakers’ ongoing promotion of labour force participation as an approach to protect women’s mental health status. This study extends the literature by investigating the mental health consequences of housewives’ transition into paid employment across different gender role attitude groups. In addition, the study also tests the potential moderating role of the presence of children in relationships. This study yields two major findings by using nationally representative data (N = 1222) from the United Kingdom Longitudinal Household Study (2010–2014) and OLS regressions. First, from the first wave to the next, housewives who transitioned into paid employment reported better mental health status than those who remained housewives. Second, the presence of children can moderate such associations, but only among housewives with more traditional gender role attitudes. Specifically, among the traditional group, the mental benefits of transition into paid employment are more pronounced among those without children. Therefore, policymakers should develop more innovative approaches to promote housewives’ mental health by considering a more gender-role-attitudes-sensitive design of future labour market policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Mental Health and Well-Being at the Workplace)
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13 pages, 1403 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Work Stress on the Well-Being of Primary and Secondary School Teachers in China
by Jingyi Liao, Xin-Qiang Wang and Xiang Wang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1154; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021154 - 09 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2074
Abstract
Primary and secondary school teachers face increasing work stress, and more attention needs to be paid to their well-being. The present study was conducted to analyze the influence of work stress on the well-being of such teachers in China, and to explore the [...] Read more.
Primary and secondary school teachers face increasing work stress, and more attention needs to be paid to their well-being. The present study was conducted to analyze the influence of work stress on the well-being of such teachers in China, and to explore the effects of family–work conflict and a self-transcendent meaning of life. A total of 562 primary and secondary school teachers completed questionnaires assessing work stress, family–work conflict, and a self-transcendent meaning of life (including grasping the meaning of failure and detachment from success or failure) as potential predictors of well-being. Work stress negatively predicted teachers’ well-being; family–work conflict mediated this relationship and a self-transcendent meaning of life moderated it. The results of this study can be used as a reference for education departments seeking to intervene to prevent teachers from developing well-being problems from the perspective of a self-transcendent meaning of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Mental Health and Well-Being at the Workplace)
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20 pages, 2245 KiB  
Systematic Review
Teleworking Effects on Mental Health—A Systematic Review and a Research Agenda
by Elisabeth Figueiredo, Clara Margaça, Brizeida Hernández-Sánchez and José Carlos Sánchez-García
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(3), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21030243 - 20 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1766
Abstract
Teleworking has become an increasingly adopted modality in organizations. However, changes in working conditions have led to several challenges regarding its impacts on professionals’ health. The aim of this study is to provide a systematic review of the literature about the impact of [...] Read more.
Teleworking has become an increasingly adopted modality in organizations. However, changes in working conditions have led to several challenges regarding its impacts on professionals’ health. The aim of this study is to provide a systematic review of the literature about the impact of teleworking on workers’ mental health. The PRISMA protocol and VOSviewer were used to identify the main trends from the set of 64 articles. The co-occurrence analyzes showed combined relationships between this new type of work and its effects on workers’ health, which resulted in four different clusters and a robust knowledge structure. Furthermore, the findings indicate that working from home has a dualistic nature. This study offers a prominent and promising framework regarding the teleworking impact on workers’ health research agenda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Mental Health and Well-Being at the Workplace)
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