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Proceedings of the 2020 inVIVO Planetary Health Annual Conference: Project Earthrise

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 24340

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
2. ORIGINS Project, Telethon Kids Institute at Perth Children’s Hospital, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
3. NOVA Institute for Health of People, Places and Planet, 1407 Fleet Street, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
Interests: planetary health; ecological and social justice; immunology and inflammation; microbiome science; NCDs (noncommunicable diseases); nutrition; life-course wellness and ‘DOHaD’ (development origins of health and disease); integrative approaches to wellness and disease prevention
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Family & Community Medicine-INMED, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, USA
2. Arctic Indigenous Wellness Foundation, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2N5, Canada
Interests: planetary health; education for sustainable health care; Indigenous health; environmental health; health equity; knowledge translation; traditional medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
Interests: planetary health; microbial ecology; ecological restoration; remote sensing; urban nature; biodiversity; nature connectedness; noncommunicable diseases; environmental health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

We are organizing a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) for the publication of the Proceedings of the 2020 inVIVO Planetary Health Annual Conference (https://www.invivoplanet.com/2020-meeting.html). This virtual meeting will be held on 1–11 December 2020.

We also welcome outside submissions that focus on understanding and improving the complex relationships between human health and planetary health.

Inviting diverse perspectives from across all dimensions of the arts and the sciences, inVIVO Planetary Health addresses the imperative for creative ecological solutions to challenges in all systems and all scales. In particular, we seek to emphasize the ways that socio-ecobiological interactions in our living environment (including urbanization, food systems, education, social inequity, climate change, biodiversity loss, and microbial ecology) impact physical, mental and spiritual well-being, together with the wider community and societal factors that govern these. We continue to have a long-range vision which includes trans-generational and ‘life-course’ approaches to disease prevention and environmental restoration.

Our meeting will bring together a tremendous network of like-minded people from diverse fields whose interests span from planetary/population/environmental health to microbial ecology/systems biology and the deep biological mechanisms—all aiming to work “symbiotically” to connect traditional “silos” through a more integrated systems framework as we seek to improve personal, environmental, economic, and societal health alike. As always, our emphasis is as on meaningful collaborations and productive friendships as it is on the data and opportunities we generate.

You are invited to submit papers presented at the 9th Annual Conference of inVIVO Planetary Health (https://www.invivoplanet.com/2020-meeting.html), for publication in IJERPH (Impact Factor 2.849). Participants of this conference, and inVIVO members, will receive a 20% discount on the Article Processing Charges.

We welcome manuscripts that discuss any aspects of personal, environmental, economic, and societal health, encouraging diverse perspectives from across many dimensions of the arts and the sciences, as we explore novel solutions and new normative values.

Papers submitted to this Special Issue of IJERPH will undergo the standard peer-review procedure. Published papers will be indexed by the SCIE (Web of Science), PubMed, and Scopus.

Prof. Dr. Susan L. Prescott
Dr. Ganesa R. Wegienka
Dr. Nicole Redvers
Mr. Jake Robinson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Planetary health
  • Ecology, biodiversity, ecosystems
  • Social and ecological justice, health disparities, socioeconomic inequalities
  • Integrative ecological solutions, mutualism
  • Environmental degradation, biodiversity loss, climate change
  • Urban landscapes, natural environments, nature relatedness
  • Green space, green prescriptions, biodiversity interdependence, cooperation, integration
  • Dysbiotic drift, the microbiome, anthropogenic ecosystems
  • Microbial ecosystems, microbial diversity, disease associations
  • Inflammation and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)
  • Mental health, emotions and wellbeing, solastalgia, ecological grief
  • Food systems, nutrition, food processing and nutritional ecology, planetary diets
  • Lifestyle and the exposome, systems biology, machine leading, personalized medicine, preventive medicine, bio-psychosocial medicine, high-level wellness
  • Life-course (developmental origins), transgenerational perspectives, epigenetics
  • Value systems, cultural shift, narrative medicine, neoliberalism, storytelling, belief systems, traditional cultures, spirituality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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16 pages, 1649 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Experiences in Two Birth Cohorts Comprising Young Families with Children under Four Years during the Initial COVID-19 Lockdown in Australia and the UK: A Qualitative Study
by Lisa Y. Gibson, Bridget Lockyer, Josie Dickerson, Charlotte Endacott, Sally Bridges, Rosemary R. C. McEachan, Kate E. Pickett, Sarah Whalan, Natasha L. Bear, Desiree T. Silva, Susan L. Prescott and Jacqueline A. Davis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9119; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179119 - 29 Aug 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4093
Abstract
This study aims to understand the experience and impact of the initial COVID-19 lockdown in young families with children aged below 4 years. Free text questions were administered to participants in the ORIGINS (Australia) and Born in Bradford (UK) cohort studies to collect [...] Read more.
This study aims to understand the experience and impact of the initial COVID-19 lockdown in young families with children aged below 4 years. Free text questions were administered to participants in the ORIGINS (Australia) and Born in Bradford (UK) cohort studies to collect qualitative information on worries, concerns and enjoyable experiences during the pandemic. A total of 903 (400 for ORIGINS and 503 for BiB) participants completed the two surveys during April 2020. Despite varying in geography, levels of socio-economic disadvantage and their situational context during the pandemic, respondents from both cohorts reported similar worries and challenges during the lockdown period, including: employment/finances, health anxiety, mental health and social isolation, caring for children and child development. Families across the globe experienced both positive and negative immediate impacts of COVID-19. Population-based data can be used to inform the development of support services, public health campaigns and universal interventions to assist families in future health crises. Full article
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21 pages, 3917 KiB  
Article
Nature’s Role in Supporting Health during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Geospatial and Socioecological Study
by Jake M. Robinson, Paul Brindley, Ross Cameron, Danielle MacCarthy and Anna Jorgensen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2227; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052227 - 24 Feb 2021
Cited by 77 | Viewed by 11401
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about unprecedented changes to human lifestyles across the world. The virus and associated social restriction measures have been linked to an increase in mental health conditions. A considerable body of evidence shows that spending time in and engaging [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about unprecedented changes to human lifestyles across the world. The virus and associated social restriction measures have been linked to an increase in mental health conditions. A considerable body of evidence shows that spending time in and engaging with nature can improve human health and wellbeing. Our study explores nature’s role in supporting health during the COVID-19 pandemic. We created web-based questionnaires with validated health instruments and conducted spatial analyses in a geographic information system (GIS). We collected data (n = 1184) on people’s patterns of nature exposure, associated health and wellbeing responses, and potential socioecological drivers such as relative deprivation, access to greenspaces, and land-cover greenness. The majority of responses came from England, UK (n = 993). We applied a range of statistical analyses including bootstrap-resampled correlations and binomial regression models, adjusting for several potential confounding factors. We found that respondents significantly changed their patterns of visiting nature as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. People spent more time in nature and visited nature more often during the pandemic. People generally visited nature for a health and wellbeing benefit and felt that nature helped them cope during the pandemic. Greater land-cover greenness within a 250 m radius around a respondent’s postcode was important in predicting higher levels of mental wellbeing. There were significantly more food-growing allotments within 100 and 250 m around respondents with high mental wellbeing scores. The need for a mutually-advantageous relationship between humans and the wider biotic community has never been more important. We must conserve, restore and design nature-centric environments to maintain resilient societies and promote planetary health. Full article
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101 pages, 6277 KiB  
Conference Report
Project Earthrise: Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Conference of inVIVO Planetary Health
by Susan L. Prescott, Ganesa Wegienka, Remco Kort, David H. Nelson, Sabine Gabrysch, Trevor Hancock, Anita Kozyrskyj, Christopher A. Lowry, Nicole Redvers, Blake Poland, Jake Robinson, Jean-Claude Moubarac, Sara Warber, Janet Jansson, Aki Sinkkonen, John Penders, Susan Erdman, Ralph Nanan, Matilda van den Bosch, Kirk Schneider, Nicholas J. Schroeck, Tanja Sobko, Jamie Harvie, George A. Kaplan, Rob Moodie, Laura Lengnick, Isaac Prilleltensky, Yuria Celidwen, Susan H. Berman, Alan C. Logan and Brian Bermanadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10654; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010654 - 12 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 7724
Abstract
The “Earthrise” photograph, taken on the 1968 Apollo 8 mission, became one of the most significant images of the 20th Century. It triggered a profound shift in environmental awareness and the potential for human unity—inspiring the first Earth Day in 1970. Taking inspiration [...] Read more.
The “Earthrise” photograph, taken on the 1968 Apollo 8 mission, became one of the most significant images of the 20th Century. It triggered a profound shift in environmental awareness and the potential for human unity—inspiring the first Earth Day in 1970. Taking inspiration from these events 50 years later, we initiated Project Earthrise at our 2020 annual conference of inVIVO Planetary Health. This builds on the emergent concept of planetary health, which provides a shared narrative to integrate rich and diverse approaches from all aspects of society towards shared solutions to global challenges. The acute catastrophe of the COVID-19 pandemic has drawn greater attention to many other interconnected global health, environmental, social, spiritual, and economic problems that have been underappreciated or neglected for decades. This is accelerating opportunities for greater collaborative action, as many groups now focus on the necessity of a “Great Transition”. While ambitious integrative efforts have never been more important, it is imperative to apply these with mutualistic value systems as a compass, as we seek to make wiser choices. Project Earthrise is our contribution to this important process. This underscores the imperative for creative ecological solutions to challenges in all systems, on all scales with advancing global urbanization in the digital age—for personal, environmental, economic and societal health alike. At the same time, our agenda seeks to equally consider our social and spiritual ecology as it does natural ecology. Revisiting the inspiration of “Earthrise”, we welcome diverse perspectives from across all dimensions of the arts and the sciences, to explore novel solutions and new normative values. Building on academic rigor, we seek to place greater value on imagination, kindness and mutualism as we address our greatest challenges, for the health of people, places and planet. Full article
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