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Physical Activity and Health: Strategies and Action Plans to Prevent Public Health Risks

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2024) | Viewed by 6898

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Urban Planning and Community Development, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA 02125, USA
Interests: immigrant health; global health; worker health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Study Design and Scientific Writing, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Centro Universitário FMABC, Santo André 09060-650, SP, Brazil
Interests: exercise; metabolic diseases; heart rate variability; blood pressure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), if physical activity increased by 25%, more than 1.3 million early deaths could be avoided each year worldwide. A sedentary lifestyle is the fourth most important risk factor for early mortality from all causes.
Physical activity is good for the mind and body. The benefits go far beyond keeping or losing weight. Reduced risk of hypertension, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and depression are some of the health benefits of regular physical activity.
This Special Issue seeks to address healthier lifestyles, with an emphasis on physical exercise related to main heart, lung, and metabolic diseases, as well as its relationship with the social determinants of health and government policies.

Researchers are invited to contribute novel work for publication in this Special Issue. The submissions can include original articles and critical reviews, such as systematic reviews or meta-analyses. There are no restrictions on study design or methodology (i.e., secondary analyses, cross-sectional or longitudinal designs, intervention studies, or observational studies).

Dr. C. Eduardo Siqueira
Dr. Rodrigo Daminello Raimundo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • exercise
  • healthy lifestyles
  • prevention health risks
  • physical therapy
  • metabolic diseases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1340 KiB  
Article
Cardiac Behavior and Heart Rate Variability in Elderly Hypertensive Individuals during Aerobic Exercise: A Non-Randomized Controlled Study
by Paulo Evaristo de Andrade, Juliana Zangirolami-Raimundo, Tassiane Cristina Morais, Luiz Carlos De Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Siqueira, Isabel Cristina Esposito Sorpreso, José Maria Soares Júnior and Rodrigo Daminello Raimundo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1292; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021292 - 11 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2129
Abstract
Background: High blood pressure is an important public health problem due to its high prevalence, the difficulty to control it, and its high contribution to morbidity. A series of changes may be linked to the aging process, compromising cardiac conduction, and reducing cardiovascular [...] Read more.
Background: High blood pressure is an important public health problem due to its high prevalence, the difficulty to control it, and its high contribution to morbidity. A series of changes may be linked to the aging process, compromising cardiac conduction, and reducing cardiovascular baroreceptor function. Advancing age promotes a decline in heart rate variability and this decrease can increase the probability of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the autonomic modulation of heart rate in hypertensive elderly individuals during and after a session of aerobic exercise, and to compare it with elderly individuals without cardiovascular or metabolic disease. Our study was a non-randomized controlled study with hypertensive elderly (HBP group) and elderly without cardiovascular and/or metabolic diseases (control group). Data on blood pressure and heart rate variability (HRV) were collected before, during, and after 30 min of aerobic physical exercise on a treadmill. There was a reduction in HF (ms2) and SD1 (ms) in the 5 min of recovery for the elderly in the control group. The elderly in the control group also had greater RMSSD and SD1 30 min post-exercise when compared to the initial mins of recovery. We concluded that there was no difference in autonomic modulation and global heart rate variability between elderly individuals without cardiovascular and metabolic diseases and hypertensive individuals after a bout of aerobic exercise. Elderly individuals without metabolic diseases showed a decrease in parasympathetic modulation and global variability between the time of rest and 5 min of recovery. However, up to 30 min of post-exercise recovery, they restored parasympathetic activity. Full article
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11 pages, 1491 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Lifestyle and Residence Area with 25(OH)D Levels in Older Adults
by Ubiraídys de Andrade Isidorio, Elisangela Vilar de Assis, Sheylla Nadjane Batista Lacerda, Ankilma do Nascimento Andrade Feitosa, Beatriz da Costa Aguiar Alves, Thais Gascón, Glaucia Luciano da Veiga and Fernando Luiz Affonso Fonseca
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010407 - 27 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1283
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether the habitat of older adults living in the urban and rural areas is a contributing factor to altered serum 25(OH)D levels. An analytical, cross-sectional research with a quantitative approach was conducted in the upper [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate whether the habitat of older adults living in the urban and rural areas is a contributing factor to altered serum 25(OH)D levels. An analytical, cross-sectional research with a quantitative approach was conducted in the upper backwoods of Paraíba with older adults registered at the Reference Center for Social Assistance (CRAS), addressing residents of both rural area (n = 41) and urban area (n = 43) who were randomly chosen to participate in the study. Data collection took place between January and February 2020. Higher rates of handgrip strength were observed in rural older adults (29.22 ± 8.92 Kgf) with serum 25(OH)D levels in the range of 30 to 40 ng/mL when compared to older adults with concentrations below 30 ng/mL (21.82 ± 5.00 Kgf) and above 40 ng/mL (23.47 ± 6.88 Kgf). Older people living in the urban area, with 25(OH)D levels above 40 ng/mL, presented a lower muscle power index when compared to individuals with vitamin levels from 21 to 29 ng/mL (17.40 ± 6.34 s; 15.33 ± 2.00 s). The urbanization associated with 25(OH)D levels can cause changes in skeletal and respiratory muscle strength, because the habitat associated with 25(OH)D levels affects the parameters of muscle strength of the upper limbs for older adults living in a rural area and the muscle strength of the lower limbs for those living in an urban area. Full article
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17 pages, 4285 KiB  
Article
Effect of Longitudinal Practice in Real and Virtual Environments on Motor Performance, Physical Activity and Enjoyment in People with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial
by Íbis A. P. Moraes, Joyce A. Lima, Nadja M. Silva, Amanda O. Simcsik, Ana C. Silveira, Lilian D. C. Menezes, Luciano V. Araújo, Tânia B. Crocetta, Mariana C. Voos, James Tonks, Talita D. Silva, Helen Dawes and Carlos B. M. Monteiro
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 14668; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192214668 - 8 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2517
Abstract
(1) Background: People with ASD commonly present difficulty performing motor skills and a decline in physical activity (PA) level and low enjoyment of PA. We aimed to evaluate whether longitudinal practice of an activity in virtual and real environments improves motor performance and [...] Read more.
(1) Background: People with ASD commonly present difficulty performing motor skills and a decline in physical activity (PA) level and low enjoyment of PA. We aimed to evaluate whether longitudinal practice of an activity in virtual and real environments improves motor performance and whether this improvement is transferred to a subsequent practice when changing the environment, promoting PA and providing enjoyment; (2) Methods: People with ASD, aged between 10 and 16 years, were included and distributed randomly into two opposite sequences. The participants performed a 10 session protocol, with five sessions practicing in each environment (virtual or real). Heart rate measurement was carried out and an enjoyment scale was applied; (3) Results: 22 participants concluded the protocol. Sequence A (virtual first) presented an improvement in accuracy and precision and transferred this when changing environment; they also had a greater change in heart rate reserve. The majority of participants reported “fun” and “great fun” levels for enjoyment; (4) Conclusions: The virtual reality activity presented a higher level of difficulty, with greater gains in terms of transference to the real environment. Considering PA, our task provided very light to light activity and the majority of participants enjoyed the task. Full article
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