Special Issue "Population Health Management"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Sampath Parthasarathy

Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32827, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 407-747-0323
Interests: atherosclerosis; heart failure mechanisms; cardiovascular pharmacology; cardiovascular nutrition; fatty acids; lipids and lipoproteins; oxidative stress and antioxidants; endometriosis; macrophages

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Population health and associated morbidities, which are confidently assigned to identified determinants, continue to offer an opportunity for the healthcare industry to become involved in managing its respective population’s health status. Moreover, continued research involving a population’s level of health and related behaviors are also focusing on the cost of preventive care provided now, versus care for more acute conditions later. The United States has the most expensive healthcare industry in the world, estimated to approach 20% of its gross domestic product by 2020, while other countries are also struggling to balance the value formula (quality and cost), all while collectively dealing with aging populations across the globe. Efforts to encourage individual responsibility and enhance medical provider and organizational value focus on the use of health information technology (electronic health records) and pay-for-performance (P4P) reimbursement methodologies, slowing straying from fee-for-service which inherently rewards the provision of more costly healthcare. For those healthcare professionals involved in population health and population health management, the goal continues to support that of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) Triple Aim: Experience of care, per capita cost, and population health.

 Reference:  Institute for Healthcare Improvement.  http://www.ihi.org/Engage/Initiatives/TripleAim/Pages/default.aspx

Prof. Dr. Sampath Parthasarathy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • population health
  • population health management
  • reimbursement
  • cost
  • quality
  • health information
  • technology

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Health System’s Journey toward Better Population Health through Empanelment and Panel Management
Received: 16 April 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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Abstract
The USA is steadily moving towards a health system that emphasizes ‘wellness’ over ‘sickness’ care. An effective wellness program utilizes a ‘population health’ approach that ensures that all patients who seek care from a health system receive the services recommended by evidence and
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The USA is steadily moving towards a health system that emphasizes ‘wellness’ over ‘sickness’ care. An effective wellness program utilizes a ‘population health’ approach that ensures that all patients who seek care from a health system receive the services recommended by evidence and best practice. This means attending not just to patients who are seen for care, but also to patients who have not yet been seen. A key strategy for population health is empanelment and panel management for patients in primary care. This article relates the experience of UW (University of Washington) Medicine in implementing such a program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Health Management)
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Open AccessArticle Modeling the Population Health Impact of Introducing a Modified Risk Tobacco Product into the U.S. Market
Received: 4 April 2018 / Revised: 24 April 2018 / Accepted: 26 April 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
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Abstract
Philip Morris International (PMI) has developed the Population Health Impact Model (PHIM) to quantify, in the absence of epidemiological data, the effects of marketing a candidate modified risk tobacco product (cMRTP) on the public health of a whole population. Various simulations were performed
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Philip Morris International (PMI) has developed the Population Health Impact Model (PHIM) to quantify, in the absence of epidemiological data, the effects of marketing a candidate modified risk tobacco product (cMRTP) on the public health of a whole population. Various simulations were performed to understand the harm reduction impact on the U.S. population over a 20-year period under various scenarios. The overall reduction in smoking attributable deaths (SAD) over the 20-year period was estimated as 934,947 if smoking completely went away and between 516,944 and 780,433 if cMRTP use completely replaces smoking. The reduction in SADs was estimated as 172,458 for the World Health Organization (WHO) 2025 Target and between 70,274 and 90,155 for the gradual cMRTP uptake. Combining the scenarios (WHO 2025 Target and cMRTP uptake), the reductions were between 256,453 and 268,796, depending on the cMRTP relative exposure. These results show how a cMRTP can reduce overall population harm additionally to existing tobacco control efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Health Management)
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Open AccessCommunication The Geography of the Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality in Spain: Should We Focus on Industrial Pollutants Prevention?
Received: 31 October 2017 / Revised: 21 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 25 November 2017
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Abstract
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a high worldwide prevalence but little is known about its aetiology and risk factors. Recent research suggests environmental factors might increase AD risk. We aim to describe the association between AD mortality and the presence of highly polluting industry
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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a high worldwide prevalence but little is known about its aetiology and risk factors. Recent research suggests environmental factors might increase AD risk. We aim to describe the association between AD mortality and the presence of highly polluting industry in small areas in Spain between 1999 and 2010. We calculated AD age-adjusted Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR), stratified by sex, grouped by industrial pollution density, compared for each small area of Spain. In the small areas with the highest mortality, the SMR among women was at least 25% greater than the national average (18% in men). The distribution of AD mortality was generally similar to that of high industrial pollution (higher mortality in the north, the Mediterranean coast and in some southern areas). The risk of AD mortality among women was 140% higher (123% among men) in areas with the highest industrial density in comparison to areas without polluting industries. This study has identified a geographical pattern of small areas with higher AD mortality risk and an ecological positive association with the density of highly polluting industry. Further research is needed on the potential impact of this type of industry pollution on AD aetiology and mortality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Health Management)
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Open AccessArticle Social Determinants and Poor Diet Quality of Energy-Dense Diets of Australian Young Adults
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 26 September 2017 / Accepted: 27 September 2017 / Published: 1 October 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (692 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This research aimed to determine the diet quality and socio-demographic determinants by level of energy-density of diets of Australian young adults. Secondary analysis of the Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey-2011/2012 for adults aged 18–34 years (n = 2397) was conducted.
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This research aimed to determine the diet quality and socio-demographic determinants by level of energy-density of diets of Australian young adults. Secondary analysis of the Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey-2011/2012 for adults aged 18–34 years (n = 2397) was conducted. Diet was assessed by 24-h recalls. Dietary energy-density was calculated as dietary energy/grams of food (kJ/g) and the Healthy-Eating-Index-for-Australians (HEIFA-2013) was used to assess diet quality (highest score = 100). Dietary energy-density was examined with respect to diet quality and sociodemographic determinants including gender, highest tertiary-education attainment, country-of-birth, age, income, and socio-economic-index-for-area (SEIFA). Higher dietary energy-density was associated with lower diet quality scores (β = −3.71, t (2394) = −29.29, p < 0.0001) and included fewer fruits and vegetables, and more discretionary foods. The mean dietary energy-density was 7.7 kJ/g and 7.2 kJ/g for men and women, respectively. Subpopulations most at risk of consuming high energy-dense diets included those with lower education, Australian and English-speaking countries of birth, and men with low income and women from areas of lower socio-economic status. Young adults reporting low energy-dense diets had higher quality diets. Intensive efforts are needed to reduce the high energy-density of young adults’ diets, and should ensure they include populations of lower socio-economic status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Health Management)
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Open AccessArticle Student Perceptions and Acceptance of Mobile Technology in an Undergraduate Nursing Program
Received: 3 June 2017 / Revised: 13 July 2017 / Accepted: 17 July 2017 / Published: 21 July 2017
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Abstract
Mobile technology allows healthcare students to access current evidence-based resources. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the student experience of implementing point-of-care (POC) smartphone applications in a first-semester undergraduate nursing program. Teaching methods included using case studies in the laboratory to
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Mobile technology allows healthcare students to access current evidence-based resources. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the student experience of implementing point-of-care (POC) smartphone applications in a first-semester undergraduate nursing program. Teaching methods included using case studies in the laboratory to familiarize students with the apps. At community screening sites, evidence-based guidelines were referenced when students discussed screening results with patients. Surveys were administered prior to implementing this innovation and after the students utilized the apps in direct patient interactions. Survey results were analyzed to evaluate student perceptions and acceptance of mobile technology. Students felt that healthcare smartphone apps were a helpful and convenient way to obtain evidence-based clinical information pertinent to direct care settings. Over 90% of students planned to continue using healthcare smartphone apps. In conclusion, healthcare smartphone apps are a way for students to become comfortable accessing evidence-based clinical resources. It is important to encourage students to use these resources early in the curriculum. Community screenings are an independent health promotion activity which assists in the attainment of health equity and fosters nursing leadership. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Health Management)
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Open AccessArticle Integrating Mental and Physical Health Care for Low-Income Americans: Assessing a Federal Program’s Initial Impact on Access and Cost
Received: 6 June 2017 / Revised: 7 July 2017 / Accepted: 10 July 2017 / Published: 12 July 2017
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Abstract
Individuals with mental health disorders often die decades earlier than the average person, and low-income individuals disproportionately experience limited access to necessary services. In 2014, the U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) leveraged Affordable Care Act funds to address these challenges through
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Individuals with mental health disorders often die decades earlier than the average person, and low-income individuals disproportionately experience limited access to necessary services. In 2014, the U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) leveraged Affordable Care Act funds to address these challenges through behavioral health integration. The objective of this study is to assess the US$55 million program’s first-year impact on access and cost. This analysis uses multivariable difference-in-difference regression models to estimate changes in outcomes between the original 219 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) Behavioral Health Integration grantees and two comparison groups. The primary outcome variables are annual depression screening rate, percentage of mental health and substance use patients served, and per capita cost. The results change when comparing the Behavioral Health Integration (BHI) grantees to a propensity score-matched comparison group versus comparing the grantees to the full population of health centers. After one year of implementation, the grant program appeared ineffective as measured by this study’s outcomes, though costs did not significantly rise because of the program. This study has limitations that must be discussed, including non-randomized study design, FQHC data measurement, and BHI program design consequences. Time will tell if FQHC-based behavioral–physical health care integration will improve access among low-income, medically-underserved populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Health Management)
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