Special Issue "Nursing Education and Health Promotion"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Nursing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Beata Dobrowolska
Website
Guest Editor
Medical University of Lublin, Faculty of Health Sciences, Al. Racławickie 1, Lublin, Poland
Interests: nursing ethics; nursing education; health promotion; health education
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alvisa Palese
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Science, Udine University, Italy
Interests: nursing education; nursing management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main purpose of this Special Issue is to present scientific evidence on nursing education in the context of implementing health promotion. Nurses play a key role in the implementation of health promotion. They are responsible for diagnosing clients' needs in this scope, and for planning and implementing health-promoting programs. Moreover, their experience legitimizes their participation in shaping health promotion policy at the local, national, and international levels. Therefore, they need to be professionally educated to develop innovative strategies and methods of implementing health promotion programs while working with individuals, groups, and communities.

We welcome papers exploring the professional education of nurses preparing them for the realization of health promotion programs; conceptual foundations for the development of education programs in this field; examples of innovative teaching strategies and methods aiming at the development of nurses’ competences to provide effective health promotion; analysis showing the relationship between nursing education and activities undertaken to promote the health of clients with different health conditions and with different needs; and examples of good practices regarding nursing education and its impact on professional practice in the scope of health promotion. All levels of nursing education, and all areas of health care systems, may be considered.
Research may be quantitative, qualitative, mixed-methods, or reviews that meet established review standards, and data may be from primary or secondary sources.

Prof. Dr. Beata Dobrowolska
Prof. Dr. Alvisa Palese
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Healthcare
  • Nursing education
  • Health promotion
  • Health education
  • Nurses competence
  • Primary and secondary prevention
  • Nursing students
  • Health behaviors

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Differences in Health Behavior Profiles of Adolescents in Urban and Rural Areas in a Korean City
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 282; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030282 - 04 Mar 2021
Abstract
Through a latent class analysis approach, we can classify individuals and identify subgroups according to health behavior patterns, and find evidence for the development of customized intervention programs to target high-risk groups. Our study aimed to explore differences in latent classes of health [...] Read more.
Through a latent class analysis approach, we can classify individuals and identify subgroups according to health behavior patterns, and find evidence for the development of customized intervention programs to target high-risk groups. Our study aimed to explore differences in latent classes of health behaviors in adolescents by region (urban vs. rural areas) in a Korean city. This cross-sectional secondary analysis utilized data collected from all first graders’ student health checkups in middle school and high school in a city of the largest island in Korea in 2016 (n = 1807). Health behavior indicators included both healthy (consuming breakfast regularly, consuming vegetables daily, consuming milk daily, consuming fast food on a limited basis, engaging in vigorous physical activities, brushing teeth, and practicing hand hygiene) and unhealthy (drinking, smoking, and overusing the internet) behaviors. Nutritional and diet behaviors were important factors for classifying healthy and unhealthy adolescents in both regions. Approximately 11% of rural students belonged to the risky group, which was characterized by a high level of drinking alcohol and smoking. These results suggest that when developing health policies for adolescents, customized policy-making and education based on the targeted groups’ behavioral patterns could be more effective than a uniform approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Education and Health Promotion)
Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Simulation Nursing Education Using the Outcome-Present State-Test Model on Clinical Reasoning, the Problem-Solving Process, Self-Efficacy, and Clinical Competency in Korean Nursing Students
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030243 - 24 Feb 2021
Viewed by 130
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a simulation nursing education program in terms of clinical reasoning, problem-solving process, self-efficacy, and clinical competency using the Outcome-Present State-Test (OPT) model in nursing students. The participants comprised 45 undergraduate nursing students [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a simulation nursing education program in terms of clinical reasoning, problem-solving process, self-efficacy, and clinical competency using the Outcome-Present State-Test (OPT) model in nursing students. The participants comprised 45 undergraduate nursing students recruited from two universities in Korea. The number of nursing students assigned to the experimental group and control group were 25 and 20, respectively. For a period of two weeks, the experimental group received a simulation nursing education program using the OPT model, while the control group received a traditional clinical practicum. The data were analyzed using prior homogeneity tests (Fisher’s exact test and paired t-test); ANCOVA was performed to investigate the differences in dependent variables between the two groups. There was a significant improvement in clinical reasoning (F = 10.59, p = 0.002), problem-solving process (F = 30.92, p < 0.001), and self-efficacy (F = 36.03, p < 0.001) in the experimental group as compared to the control group (F = 10.59, p = 0.002). Moreover, the experimental group showed significantly higher scores in clinical competency than the control group (F = 11.07, p = 0.002). This study demonstrates that the simulation nursing education program using the OPT model for undergraduate students is very effective in promoting clinical reasoning, problem-solving processes, self-efficacy, and clinical competency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Education and Health Promotion)
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Open AccessArticle
Substance Use and Addictive Behavior in Spanish Adolescents in Secondary School
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020186 - 09 Feb 2021
Viewed by 301
Abstract
The detection and prevention of addictive behaviour at an early age is essential given the relationship between the age of the onset of consumption and the appearance of addiction disorders. The aim of this study was to describe the behavior related to substance [...] Read more.
The detection and prevention of addictive behaviour at an early age is essential given the relationship between the age of the onset of consumption and the appearance of addiction disorders. The aim of this study was to describe the behavior related to substance use and addictive behaviors in adolescents at secondary school from 12 to 16 years of age. A cross-sectional descriptive study has been conducted. The prevalence of consumption of different addictive substances (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, cocaine) and addictive behaviours (use of social networks and video games) were collated, and the influence of the surrounding social environment and risk perception were evaluated. The final sample was 1298 students. Alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use reflect the prevalence of last month’s consumption: 14% (11.8–15.6), 15% (13.4–17.4) and 3% (1.9–2.7) respectively. 76% of the sample frequently use the Internet (5–7 days per week). There is a positive association between the frequency of use and use in the immediate environment. The relationships found show the need for educational and preventive intervention aimed at parents and students that will allow them to know and effectively deal with possible problems associated with the consumption of addictive substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Education and Health Promotion)
Open AccessArticle
Factors Affecting Health-Promoting Behaviors in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010060 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 344
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death globally and the second most common cause of death in South Korea. Health-promoting behaviors recommended for patients with cardiovascular disease include control of diet, physical activity, cessation of smoking, medication adherence, and adherence to medical [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death globally and the second most common cause of death in South Korea. Health-promoting behaviors recommended for patients with cardiovascular disease include control of diet, physical activity, cessation of smoking, medication adherence, and adherence to medical recommendations. This study aimed to determine the relationship between depression, anxiety, perception of health status, and health-promoting behavior in patients from South Korea who have suffered from cardiovascular disease. The study population comprised 161 patients at the cardiovascular center at H Hospital who were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. Descriptive statistics and stepwise multiple regression were employed to analyze the data. Negative correlations existed between depression, perception of health status, and health-promoting behavior. By contrast, a positive correlation existed between the perception of health status and health-promoting behavior. The main factors affecting health-promoting behaviors were alcohol consumption, duration of diagnosis, perception of health status, and depression. These variables explained 15.8% of the variance. To prevent adverse cardiac events, patients who suffer from cardiovascular disease should be assessed as soon as possible to identify psychiatric symptoms, thereby developing a potential intervention aimed at decreasing negative illness consequences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Education and Health Promotion)
Open AccessArticle
A Comparative Analysis of Student and Practising Nurses’ Health Literacy Knowledge in Ghana
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010038 - 04 Jan 2021
Viewed by 436
Abstract
This study examined student and practising nurses’ health literacy knowledge, and its correlates in Ghana. It was underpinned by an adapted version of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) conceptual framework of health literacy. We used convenience and snowball sampling techniques to collect data [...] Read more.
This study examined student and practising nurses’ health literacy knowledge, and its correlates in Ghana. It was underpinned by an adapted version of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) conceptual framework of health literacy. We used convenience and snowball sampling techniques to collect data from 876 nurses (477 student nurses and 399 practising nurses) in a cross-sectional survey from February 2019 to June 2019. The respondents were drawn from all the former ten administrative regions of Ghana. Approximately 75.4% of the respondents had heard of health literacy. However, health literacy knowledge was generally low (average score of 6.6 out of 20) among both groups, with student nurses (average score of 5.8 out of 20) having significantly lower scores than practising nurses (average score of 7.4 out of 20). Factors associated with health literacy knowledge among student nurses included gender (male, B = −0.499, p < 0.01), trust in others (B = −0.874, p < 0.001), cultural values (B = 0.276, p < 0.001), year of study (B = 0.244, p < 0.05), and frequency of curative care use (B = −0.236, p < 0.05). For practising nurses, trust (B = −1.252, p < 0.01), cultural values (B = 0.357, p < 0.01), and working experience (B = 0.612, p < 0.01) were associated with their health literacy knowledge. Thus, responses targeted at gaps in health literacy knowledge of student and practising nurses must be sensitive to personal characteristics (e.g., gender), social values (e.g., issues of trust, and cultural beliefs and practices), as well as factors relating to nursing education and experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Education and Health Promotion)
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Open AccessArticle
Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Adults: Its Association with Health Literacy, Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Health-Promoting Behavior
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040407 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 830
Abstract
This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the relationships among sociodemographics, health literacy, self-efficacy, social support, health-promoting behavior, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in older adults. A total of 240 older adults aged >65 years were recruited from three community senior welfare centers [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the relationships among sociodemographics, health literacy, self-efficacy, social support, health-promoting behavior, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in older adults. A total of 240 older adults aged >65 years were recruited from three community senior welfare centers in South Korea. Standardized self-administered questionnaires measuring sociodemographic characteristics, health literacy, social support, self-efficacy, health-promoting behavior, and health-related quality of life were distributed to older adults. Multiple regression analyses with stepwise selection was used to determine the factors affecting health-related quality of life. Factors affecting a higher physical component score of HRQOL were a higher comprehension level of and numeracy in health literacy, physical health-promoting behavior, perceived emotional-informational support, and a lesser number of comorbidities. Factors affecting a higher mental component score of HRQOL were a higher comprehension level of and numeracy in health literacy, self-efficacy, physical health-promoting behavior, perceived emotional-informational support, and a lesser number of comorbidities. To improve HRQOL among older adults, nursing interventions are required to measure health literacy, empower physical health-promoting behavior and self-efficacy, and enhance emotional-informational support from family or other resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Education and Health Promotion)

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Open AccessProtocol
Sexual Competence in Higher Education: Global Perspective in a Multicentric Project in the Nursing Degree
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020166 - 04 Feb 2021
Viewed by 221
Abstract
Sexuality is an important issue in the university careers of nursing students to ensure that they provide comprehensive care. It is necessary according to the recommendation of the World Health Organization. However, research reveals deficiencies and the need for further development. The aim [...] Read more.
Sexuality is an important issue in the university careers of nursing students to ensure that they provide comprehensive care. It is necessary according to the recommendation of the World Health Organization. However, research reveals deficiencies and the need for further development. The aim of the study is to describe the perspective of teachers and students on the content of sexuality in nursing education. The project aims to analyze the attitudes and beliefs of the students about the sexuality of their patients. Furthermore, the experience and sexual lives of the future nurses, as well the teaching of sexuality content in the curriculum, will be analyzed. As for the educators, their level of knowledge about sexuality and vision of sexuality education in undergraduate nursing education will be analyzed. This study is an exploratory and descriptive study with a quantitative-qualitative approach in a multi-center context. The sample is composed of students and professors of nursing courses from five universities (Portugal, Spain, Italy and United States). Questionnaires and semistructured interviews will be used for data collection. The results of the study will allow the inclusion of sexual competence in the curriculum from the beginning in higher education. This article describes the research protocol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing Education and Health Promotion)
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