Special Issue "Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dominic M. Murphy
Website
Guest Editor
1. Combat Stress, Leatherhead, United Kingdom
2. King’s Centre for Military Health Research, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
Interests: PTSD; complex-PTSD; military mental health; veterans; co-morbidities; psychology; epidemiology; treatment outcomes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Walter Busuttil
Website
Guest Editor
Combat Stress, Leatherhead, United Kingdom
Interests: PTSD; childhood adversity; personality disorder; military mental health; service design
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. David Turgoose
Website
Guest Editor
Combat Stress, Leatherhead, United Kingdom
Interests: PTSD; e-mental health; early interventions; military mental health; complex-PTSD; children’s mental health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Substantial numbers of individuals leave the military each year. Most transition successfully out of service; however, a substantial number experience complex mental health needs. In particular, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been identified as a key health outcome. Research suggests that PTSD has a higher associated treatment cost and also higher cost to society. Worryingly, there is a suggestion that veterans with PTSD have poorer treatment outcomes than non-veteran groups.

The aims of this Special Issue are to:

  • To advocate for mental health and psychological wellbeing in veterans with PTSD
  • In particular, to shift attention to clinical samples of veterans and elucidate their needs
  • To highlight the impact of PTSD not only on veterans but also significant others around them
  • To provide a forum to discuss the latest advances in treatment for PTSD
  • To explore the possible impact of the ICD-11’s new Complex-PTSD diagnosis on the field
  • To highlight areas of excellence and best practice for supporting veterans with PTSD
  • To provide specific areas for future research via authors’ work.

Suggested topics:

  • Profiling the needs of treatment  seeking veterans
  • Exploring barriers and facilitators to treatment outcomes
  • Novel interventions to support veterans with PTSD
  • Complex-PTSD
  • Co-morbid difficulties
  • Exploring the unique challenges faced by veterans with PTSD
  • Families: understanding the impact of living alongside PTSD
  • Families: exploring interventions to support military families
  • Interventions to support integrated psychological care and holistic health outcomes
  • Measuring outcomes
  • How service users can help develop successful care pathways.
Dr. Dominic M. Murphy
Dr. Walter Busuttil
Dr. David Turgoose
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • PTSD
  • Complex-PTSD
  • treatment outcome studies
  • treatment-seeking veterans
  • clinical samples
  • co-morbidity
  • depression
  • anger
  • partners
  • childhood adversity
  • emotional dysregulation

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Understanding the Needs of Veterans with PTSD
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030100 - 15 Aug 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
The Link between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Functionality among United States Military Service Members Psychiatrically Hospitalized Following a Suicide Crisis
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030095 - 07 Aug 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders in the United States and has been linked to suicidal thoughts and behaviors, yet the role of a PTSD diagnosis on functional impairment among suicidal individuals remains unknown. This study [...] Read more.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders in the United States and has been linked to suicidal thoughts and behaviors, yet the role of a PTSD diagnosis on functional impairment among suicidal individuals remains unknown. This study examined the association between PTSD status and functional impairment among military psychiatric inpatients admitted for acute suicide risk (N = 166) with a lifetime history of at least one suicide attempt. Measures of functionality included: (1) alcohol use; (2) sleep quality; (3) social problem-solving; and (4) work and social adjustment. Thirty-eight percent of the sample met criteria for PTSD. Women were more likely than men to meet criteria for PTSD (p = 0.007), and participants who met PTSD criteria had significantly more psychiatric diagnoses (p < 0.001). Service members who met PTSD criteria reported more disturbed sleep (p = 0.003) and greater difficulties with work and social adjustment (p = 0.004) than those who did not meet PTSD criteria. However, functionality measures were not significantly associated with PTSD status after controlling for gender and psychiatric comorbidity. Gender and number of psychiatric comorbidities other than PTSD were significant predictors of PTSD in logistic regression models across four functionality measures. Future studies should assess the additive or mediating effect of psychiatric comorbidities in the association between impaired functioning and PTSD. Clinicians are encouraged to assess and address functionality during treatment with suicidal individuals, paying particular attention to individuals with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans)
Open AccessArticle
Veteran Treatments: PTSD Interventions
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030094 - 06 Aug 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has resulted in high social costs in terms of the lingering inability of veterans to adapt to societal norms. These costs accrue to individual veterans, their families, friends, and others. In addition, society suffers from the lost productivity of [...] Read more.
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has resulted in high social costs in terms of the lingering inability of veterans to adapt to societal norms. These costs accrue to individual veterans, their families, friends, and others. In addition, society suffers from the lost productivity of veterans. There is a need to pay greater attention to the extant literature regarding the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of various interventions. This study reviews the most relevant research regarding PTSD, veterans, interventions, treatment, counseling, job training and medication. Increasing awareness of the existing state of knowledge can lead to better targeting of resources and better health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans)
Open AccessArticle
Anger and Aggression in UK Treatment-Seeking Veterans with PTSD
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030086 - 21 Jul 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Prevalence rates of anger and aggression are often higher in military personnel. Therefore, it is important to understand more about why this is, and the factors with which it is associated. Despite this, there is little evidence relating to anger and aggression in [...] Read more.
Prevalence rates of anger and aggression are often higher in military personnel. Therefore, it is important to understand more about why this is, and the factors with which it is associated. Despite this, there is little evidence relating to anger and aggression in UK veterans who are seeking treatment for mental health difficulties such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study investigated the prevalence rates of anger and aggression in this population, as well as the associations between anger and aggression, and various sociodemographic, functioning and mental health variables. A cross-sectional design was used, with participants completing a battery of self-report questionnaires. Prevalence rates for significant anger and aggression were 74% and 28% respectively. Both women and those over 55 were less likely to report difficulties. Those with high levels of PTSD and other mental health difficulties were more likely to report anger and aggression. Other factors related to anger and aggression included unemployment due to ill health, and a perceived lack of family support. Findings showed that veterans who are seeking support for mental health are likely to be experiencing significant difficulties with anger and aggression, especially if they have comorbid mental health difficulties. The associations between anger, aggression, and other variables, has implications for the assessment and treatment of military veterans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans)
Open AccessArticle
Impact of Veteran Status and Timing of PTSD Diagnosis on Criminal Justice Outcomes
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030080 - 12 Jul 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Previous research has demonstrated that jurors show a bias towards treatment for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present research examines this bias when jurors are faced with cases of potential malingering, in which the defendant’s claim of PTSD is a perceived [...] Read more.
Previous research has demonstrated that jurors show a bias towards treatment for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present research examines this bias when jurors are faced with cases of potential malingering, in which the defendant’s claim of PTSD is a perceived attempt to escape legal punishments. Trial vignettes, in which veteran status and PTSD diagnosis timing were manipulated, were used to explore this phenomenon. It was found that veterans who received their diagnosis after being arrested were found guilty more often, and were diverted to treatment less often, than those who were diagnosed before an arrest. This has critical implications for mental healthcare in that it is crucial to properly diagnose and treat people before they find themselves in court. Further, the negative outcomes in court demonstrate one of the severe social impacts of untreated or late-diagnosed PTSD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans)
Open AccessArticle
That Guy, Is He Really Sick at All?” An Analysis of How Veterans with PTSD Experience Nature-Based Therapy
Healthcare 2018, 6(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020064 - 14 Jun 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Serving in the military leads to mental diseases, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), for a percentage of soldiers globally. The number of veterans with PTSD is increasing and, although medication and psychological treatments are offered, treatment results could be improved. Historically, different [...] Read more.
Serving in the military leads to mental diseases, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), for a percentage of soldiers globally. The number of veterans with PTSD is increasing and, although medication and psychological treatments are offered, treatment results could be improved. Historically, different forms of nature-based therapy have been used for this target group. However, in spite of anecdotally good results, studies measuring the effect of this form of therapy are still lacking. The aim of this study is to explore how veterans with PTSD manage their everyday lives during and after a ten-week nature-based intervention in a therapy garden. Methods: Eight veterans participated in qualitative interviews, which were conducted during a one-year period and were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Results: Five themes emerged from the IPA analysis: Bodily symptoms; relationships; building new identities; the future; and lessons learned. All the participating veterans gained a greater insight into and mastering of their condition, achieved better control of their lives, and developed tools to handle life situations more appropriately and to build a new identity. This improved their ability to participate in social activities and employment. Conclusion: The results should be considered in the future treatment of veterans with PTSD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans)
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring Demographics and Health as Predictors of Risk-Taking in UK Help-Seeking Veterans
Healthcare 2018, 6(2), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020058 - 05 Jun 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Risk-taking amongst veterans has severe consequences, yet few studies have examined factors that may predict risk-taking in help-seeking veteran populations. This paper presents a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 667 UK help-seeking veterans, investigating the role of demographics, mental health and [...] Read more.
Risk-taking amongst veterans has severe consequences, yet few studies have examined factors that may predict risk-taking in help-seeking veteran populations. This paper presents a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 667 UK help-seeking veterans, investigating the role of demographics, mental health and physical health presentations on the propensity for risk-taking. Out of 403 (73.4%) veterans, 350 (86.8%) reported risk-taking in the past month. We found that younger age, being in a relationship, probable PTSD, common mental health difficulties and traumatic brain injury were significantly associated with risk-taking. Additionally, a direct association was found between increased risk-taking and PTSD symptom clusters, including higher hyperarousal, elevated negative alterations in mood and cognition. Our findings provide initial evidence for demographic and mental health presentations as predictors of risk-taking in help-seeking veterans. Further research and longitudinal studies are needed to facilitate valid risk assessments, and early intervention for veteran services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans)
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