Special Issue "Inequalities in Environmental Exposure and in Health Care"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Factors and Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Mr. Andrea Tittarelli
Website
Guest Editor
Cancer Registry Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: Epidemiology; Cancer Registries; Health Data Treatment; Database Management; Environment; Risk Assessment; Statistics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last months, most of the energy of health operators and policy makers was surely (and rightly) absorbed by the emergency due to the worldwide spread of Covid-19 virus. And this situation unfortunately is still going on, as the pandemic is not over at the moment.

But this dramatic circumstances we are now facing do not have to make us forget other important issues in Public Health, some of them also partially related to the presence and the consequences of a pandemic virus. We can think about environmental pollution and its effects on human health. But also about inequalities in the access to health care, both inter- and intra-countries, or in the possibility of limiting personal exposure, and consequently the potential adverse outcomes associated. Socio-economical status (SES) is a variable not simple to assess and manage in epidemiological studies. But it is surely an important topic to consider, as it could affect many relationships found between risk factors and health effects.

For this reason, the aim of this Special Issue is mainly to collect paper considering the role of SES in epidemiological studies, the methods that are used to assess it at the smallest possible level (as an approximation of the personal socio-economical status), its influence in the association between risk factors (mainly environmental factors, but not only) and any health outcomes. The papers could be original studies or reviews of scientific literature; they could describe an epidemiological study in which this topic is addressed or they could be methodological articles or also commentaries. Finally, papers considering inequalities in the access to health care are also welcome.

Mr. Andrea Tittarelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Environmental pollution
  • Epidemiology
  • Personal exposure
  • Risk assessment
  • Confounders
  • SES
  • Inequalities
  • Health care

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Uptake of Health Care Services by Refugees: Modelling a Country Response to a Western Balkan Refugee Crisis
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040560 - 14 Dec 2020
Abstract
Planning and adjusting health capacities to meet the needs of refugees is a constant issue for transit and destination countries following the 2015/2016 Western Balkans refugee crisis. Understanding this crisis is important for taking the right steps in the future. The study informs [...] Read more.
Planning and adjusting health capacities to meet the needs of refugees is a constant issue for transit and destination countries following the 2015/2016 Western Balkans refugee crisis. Understanding this crisis is important for taking the right steps in the future. The study informs about the prediction of the refugees’ health needs and demands for services in correspondence to political decision-making during 2015/2016 Western Balkan Refugee Crisis. Time series analysis, linear regression, and correlation analyses modelled the weekly flux of arrivals of more than half a million refugees to Serbia and the European Union, changes in the utilization of health care services, and disease diagnoses. With strategic planning, in the event of a recurrence of the refugee crises, the demand for health care services in the transit country could increase by 63 (95% CI: 21–105) for every additional 1000 refugees. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inequalities in Environmental Exposure and in Health Care)
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Open AccessArticle
Psychological Distress and Somatization in Immigrants in Primary Health Care Practices
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040557 - 13 Dec 2020
Abstract
The process of international migration causes a situation of vulnerability in people’s health and greater difficulty in coping with disease. Furthermore, the adversities suffered during migration can trigger reactive signs of stress and cause anxious, depressive, confusional and somatic symptoms. This article studies [...] Read more.
The process of international migration causes a situation of vulnerability in people’s health and greater difficulty in coping with disease. Furthermore, the adversities suffered during migration can trigger reactive signs of stress and cause anxious, depressive, confusional and somatic symptoms. This article studies the relationships between psychosocial risk, psychological distress and somatization in immigrants from four communities: Maghrebis, Sub-Saharans, South Americans and South Asian. A cross-sectional study was carried out with questionnaires on 602 immigrants who were surveyed in the primary care centers of an urban area of Catalonia. The instruments used were the Demographic Psychosocial Inventory (DPSI), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI). The average psychosocial risk obtained was 0.35, with the highest values in the Sub-Saharan community. Psychological distress showed a mean value of 0.66, with the Sub-Saharan community scoring the lowest in all dimensions except depression. The average somatization values were 1.65, with the Sub-Saharan community scoring the least. The female gender is a risk factor for somatization and psychological distress. Perceived psychosocial risk is a predictor of psychological distress, but not somatization, suggesting that the use of more adaptive coping strategies could minimize the effect of the migration process on somatizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inequalities in Environmental Exposure and in Health Care)
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