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Article

Psychological Distress and Somatization in Immigrants in Primary Health Care Practices

1
Research Support Unit Metropolitana Nord, Primary Care Research Institut Jordi Gol (IDIAPJGol), 08303 Barcelona, Spain
2
Nursing Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
3
Multidisciplinary Research Group in Health and Society GREMSAS (2017 SGR 917), 08007 Barcelona, Spain
4
Faculty of Psychology, Education Sciences and Sport, Ramon Llull University, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
5
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040557
Received: 11 November 2020 / Revised: 10 December 2020 / Accepted: 11 December 2020 / Published: 13 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inequalities in Environmental Exposure and in Health Care)
The process of international migration causes a situation of vulnerability in people’s health and greater difficulty in coping with disease. Furthermore, the adversities suffered during migration can trigger reactive signs of stress and cause anxious, depressive, confusional and somatic symptoms. This article studies the relationships between psychosocial risk, psychological distress and somatization in immigrants from four communities: Maghrebis, Sub-Saharans, South Americans and South Asian. A cross-sectional study was carried out with questionnaires on 602 immigrants who were surveyed in the primary care centers of an urban area of Catalonia. The instruments used were the Demographic Psychosocial Inventory (DPSI), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI). The average psychosocial risk obtained was 0.35, with the highest values in the Sub-Saharan community. Psychological distress showed a mean value of 0.66, with the Sub-Saharan community scoring the lowest in all dimensions except depression. The average somatization values were 1.65, with the Sub-Saharan community scoring the least. The female gender is a risk factor for somatization and psychological distress. Perceived psychosocial risk is a predictor of psychological distress, but not somatization, suggesting that the use of more adaptive coping strategies could minimize the effect of the migration process on somatizations. View Full-Text
Keywords: immigrants; somatization disorders; stress; psychological; primary health care; vulnerable populations immigrants; somatization disorders; stress; psychological; primary health care; vulnerable populations
MDPI and ACS Style

García-Sierra, R.; Fernández-Cano, M.I.; Manresa-Domínguez, J.M.; Feijoo-Cid, M.; Moreno Gabriel, E.; Arreciado Marañón, A.; Ramos-Roure, F.; Segura-Bernal, J.; Torán-Monserrat, P. Psychological Distress and Somatization in Immigrants in Primary Health Care Practices. Healthcare 2020, 8, 557. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040557

AMA Style

García-Sierra R, Fernández-Cano MI, Manresa-Domínguez JM, Feijoo-Cid M, Moreno Gabriel E, Arreciado Marañón A, Ramos-Roure F, Segura-Bernal J, Torán-Monserrat P. Psychological Distress and Somatization in Immigrants in Primary Health Care Practices. Healthcare. 2020; 8(4):557. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040557

Chicago/Turabian Style

García-Sierra, Rosa, María Isabel Fernández-Cano, Josep María Manresa-Domínguez, María Feijoo-Cid, Eduard Moreno Gabriel, Antonia Arreciado Marañón, Francesc Ramos-Roure, Jordi Segura-Bernal, and Pere Torán-Monserrat. 2020. "Psychological Distress and Somatization in Immigrants in Primary Health Care Practices" Healthcare 8, no. 4: 557. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040557

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