Special Issue "Clinical Robotics"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Artificial Intelligence in Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Koji Kanayama
Website
Guest Editor
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: plastic and reconstructive surgery; surgical robotics; artificial intelligence in medicine; hair transplantation; tissue regeneration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Robotics in healthcare has experienced revolutionary advancements in the past several decades. Clinical robots are robots applied in clinical medicine, including surgical robots, rehabilitation robots, biorobots, telepresence robots, pharmacy automation robotic systems, companion robots, and disinfection robots. These robots allow precise surgical operations and minimally invasive surgery, assist individuals with dysfunction of body parts affecting movement, act like living things through imitating the cognition of humans and animals, enable medical professionals to provide a remote healthcare practice, automate pharmacy tasks, communicate emotionally with patients leading to mental therapy effects, and keep our living environment clean to control or prevent infection of patients. This topic intends to present the latest developments in clinical robotics and applications to healthcare fields.

Dr. Koji Kanayama
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Automated pharmacy systems
  • Biomechatronics
  • Micro- to nano-scale interventions
  • Robot-assisted Surgery
  • Robotics in mental healthcare
  • Robotic rehabilitation systems
  • Surgical simulation and navigation telemedicine

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Review of Current Spinal Robotic Orthoses
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010070 - 13 Jan 2021
Viewed by 338
Abstract
Osteoporotic spine fractures (OSF) are common sequelae of osteoporosis. OSF are directly correlated with increasing age and incidence of osteoporosis. OSF are treated conservatively or surgically. Associated acute pain, chronic disabilities, and progressive deformities are well documented. Conservative measures include a combination of [...] Read more.
Osteoporotic spine fractures (OSF) are common sequelae of osteoporosis. OSF are directly correlated with increasing age and incidence of osteoporosis. OSF are treated conservatively or surgically. Associated acute pain, chronic disabilities, and progressive deformities are well documented. Conservative measures include a combination of initial bed rest, analgesia, early physiotherapy, and a spinal brace (orthosis), with the aim for early rehabilitation to prevent complications of immobile state. Spinal bracing is commonly used for symptomatic management of OSF. While traditional spinal braces aim to maintain the neutral spinal alignment and reduce the axial loading on the fractured vertebrae, they are well known for complications including discomfort with reduced compliance, atrophy of paraspinal muscles, and restriction of chest expansion leading to chest infections. Exoskeletons have been developed to passively assist and actively augment human movements with different types of actuators. Flexible, versatile spinal exoskeletons are designed to better support the spine. As new technologies enable the development of motorized wearable exoskeletons, several types have been introduced into the medical field application. We have provided a thorough review of the current spinal robotic technologies in this paper. The shortcomings in the current spinal exoskeletons were identified. Their limitations on the use for patients with OSF with potential improvement strategies were discussed. With our current knowledge of spinal orthosis for conservatively managed OSF, a semi-rigid backpack style thoracolumbar spinal robotic orthosis will reduce spinal bone stress and improve back muscle support. This will lead to back pain reduction, improved posture, and overall mobility. Early mobilization is an important part of management of patients with OSF as it reduces the chance of developing complications related to their immobile state for patients with OSF, which will be helpful for their recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Robotics)
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