Special Issue "Clinical and Dynamic Psychology in Medical Settings: The Patient-Centered Care"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022 | Viewed by 3249

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Federica Galli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, and Health Studies, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Via dei Marsi, 78 - 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: psychosomatic; clinical psychology; patient-centred medicine; shared decsion making; psychocardiology; psychoncology
Prof. Dr. Vittorio Lingiardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, and Health Studies, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Via dei Marsi, 78 - 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: personality disorders; psychotherapy research; therapeutic alliance; eating disorders; gender incongruence; sexuality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The patient-centered model of care aims to overcome the boundaries between medicine and psychology in clinical settings, focusing on the importance of taking into account not only the disease but also the patients’ characteristics (in terms of needs, preferences, values, personalities, psychopathologies, and so on). In this framework, personalised medicine addresses the urgent need to tailor medical treatments to the patients’ psychological features. It is interesting to think that psychological factors will be progressively recognised as part of the clinical and diagnostic decision process. 

Starting from these premises, we call for papers addressing the role of the patients’ psychological and psychodynamic factors in influencing the onset, adjustment, and clinical response to their treatments, with particular attention on the doctor–patient relationship and therapy adherence. Papers on the efficacy/effectiveness of psychotherapy in medical settings are welcomed as well.

Prof. Federica Galli
Prof. Dr. Vittorio Lingiardi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • patient-centered care
  • personality
  • psychopathology
  • psychocardiology
  • psychoncology
  • psychotherapy
  • medical settings
  • disease

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Differences in Resilience, Psychological Well-Being and Coping Strategies between HIV Patients and Diabetics
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020266 - 29 Jan 2022
Viewed by 607
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the differences in resilience, psychological well-being and coping strategies between patients with HIV and diabetics. The sample included a total of 400 subjects (199 patients with HIV and 201 subjects with diabetes). The instruments applied [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to determine the differences in resilience, psychological well-being and coping strategies between patients with HIV and diabetics. The sample included a total of 400 subjects (199 patients with HIV and 201 subjects with diabetes). The instruments applied for data collection were a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Resilience Scale (Wagnild and Young), the Ryff Psychological Well-being Scale and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (Sandín and Chorot). The data collection period was approximately 2 years (between February 2018 and January 2020). Based on the results of our work it was found that the subjects with HIV had lower scores than the diabetic subjects in all the resilience factors, except for the factor “feeling good alone”. In addition, the subjects with HIV scored significantly lower than the diabetic subjects on all the variables of psychological well-being. Subjects with HIV used problem-solving coping, social support seeking, positive reappraisal, religious coping and avoidance coping with less frequency than diabetic subjects. However, they used more negative auto-focused coping compared to diabetic subjects. Therefore, subjects with HIV show a different psychological pattern in relation to resilience, psychological well-being and use of coping strategies compared to diabetic subjects. Full article
Article
Perceptions of Practicing Physicians and Members of the Public on the Attributes of a “Good Doctor”
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010073 - 31 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 329
Abstract
Since physician–patient relationships are a central part of the medical practice, it is essential to understand whether physicians and the general public share the same perspective on traits defining a “good doctor”. Our study compared the perceptions of physicians and members of the [...] Read more.
Since physician–patient relationships are a central part of the medical practice, it is essential to understand whether physicians and the general public share the same perspective on traits defining a “good doctor”. Our study compared the perceptions of physicians and members of the public on the essential traits of a “good doctor.” We conducted parallel surveys of 1000 practicing specialist-physicians, and 500 members of the public in Israel. Respondents were asked about the two most important attributes of a “good doctor” and whether they thought the physicians’ role was to reduce health disparities. Many physicians (56%) and members of the public (48%) reported that the role of physicians includes helping to reduce health disparities. Physicians emphasized the importance of non-technical skills such as humaneness and concern for patients as important traits of a “good doctor,” while the public emphasized professional and technical skills. Internal medicine physicians were more likely than surgeons to emphasize humaneness, empathy, and professionalism. Future research should focus on actionable approaches to bridge the gap in the perceptions between the groups, and that may support the formation of caring physicians embedded in a complex array of relationships within clinical and community contexts. Full article
Article
Effect of Practice Environment on Nurse Reported Quality and Patient Safety: The Mediation Role of Person-Centeredness
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1578; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111578 - 18 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 648
Abstract
This study aims to explore the potential mediation role of person-centeredness between the effects of the work environment and nurse reported quality and patient safety. A quantitative cross-sectional survey collected data from 1055 nurses, working in medical and surgical units, in twelve Malaysian [...] Read more.
This study aims to explore the potential mediation role of person-centeredness between the effects of the work environment and nurse reported quality and patient safety. A quantitative cross-sectional survey collected data from 1055 nurses, working in medical and surgical units, in twelve Malaysian private hospitals. The data collection used structured questionnaires. The Hayes macro explored the mediation effect of person-centeredness between the associations of work environment dimensions and care outcomes, controlling nurses’ demographics and practice characteristics. A total of 652 nurses responded completely to the survey (61.8% response rate). About 47.7% of nurses worked 7-h shifts, and 37.0% were assigned more than 15 patients. Higher workload was associated with unfavorable outcomes. Nurses working in 12-h shifts reported a lower work environment rating (3.46 ± 0.41, p < 0.01) and person-centered care (3.55 ± 0.35, p < 0.01). Nurses assigned to more than 15 patients were less likely to report a favorable practice environment (3.53 ± 0.41, p < 0.05), perceived lower person-centered care (3.61 ± 0.36, p < 0.01), and rated lower patient safety (3.54 ± 0.62, p < 0.05). Person-centeredness mediates the effect of nurse work environment dimensions on quality and patient safety. Medical and surgical nurses, working in a healthy environment, had a high level of person-centeredness, which, in turn, positively affected the reported outcomes. The function of person-centeredness was to complement the effects of the nurse work environment on care outcomes. Improving the nurse work environment (task-oriented) with a high level of person-centeredness (patient-oriented) was a mechanism through which future initiatives could improve nursing care and prevent patient harm. Full article
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Article
Mental Health Practitioners’ Understanding of Speech Pathology in a Regional Australian Community
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1485; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111485 - 01 Nov 2021
Viewed by 499
Abstract
(1) Background: This study aimed to determine the level of knowledge and the perceptions of speech pathology held by a sample of regional mental health practitioners and to explore factors that facilitate understanding of the roles of speech pathologists in mental health. While [...] Read more.
(1) Background: This study aimed to determine the level of knowledge and the perceptions of speech pathology held by a sample of regional mental health practitioners and to explore factors that facilitate understanding of the roles of speech pathologists in mental health. While mental health is recognised as an area of practice by Speech Pathology Australia, the inclusion of speech pathologists in mental health teams is limited. (2) Methods: An anonymous online survey was created using previously validated surveys and author generated questions and distributed to mental health practitioners in Central Queensland, Australia. (3) Results: Mental health practitioners had difficulty identifying speech pathology involvement when presented with case scenarios. Accuracy was poor for language-based cases, ranging from 28.81% to 37.29%. Participants who reported having worked with a speech pathologist were more likely to demonstrate higher scores on the areas of practice questions, [r(53) = 0.301, p = 0.028], and the language scenarios [r(58) = 0.506, p < 0.001]. They were also more likely to agree to statements regarding the connection between speech pathology and mental health, r(59) = 0.527, p < 0.001. (4) Conclusions: As found in this study, contact with speech pathologists is a strong predictor of mental health providers’ knowledge of the speech pathology profession. Thus, the challenge may be to increase this contact with mental health providers to promote inclusion of speech pathologists in the mental health domain. Full article
Article
The Relationship between the Second-Generation Antipsychotics Efficacy and the Traditional Chinese Medicine Body Constitutions in Patients with Schizophrenia
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1480; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111480 - 31 Oct 2021
Viewed by 466
Abstract
Background: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment; Second-generation Antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the most prescribed medication for schizophrenia patients. The efficacy of various SGAs treatment may differ in schizophrenia patients with various traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) body constitution (BC) types. Method: This study applied a [...] Read more.
Background: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment; Second-generation Antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the most prescribed medication for schizophrenia patients. The efficacy of various SGAs treatment may differ in schizophrenia patients with various traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) body constitution (BC) types. Method: This study applied a longitudinal quantitative research design, where a total of 66 participants were recruited. The Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) score were used to evaluate patients’ psychopathology status in hospitalization, and body constitution questionnaires were conducted by face-to-face interviews in the 1st, 3rd, and 6th week of hospitalization. Results: More than 60% of schizophrenia patients who were treated with SGAs were classified to have unbalanced BC types including Yin-Xu, Yang-Xu and Stasis. Generalized estimating equation analysis revealed significant time effects in CGI and PANSS score improvements in both unbalanced and gentleness (balance) BC types, but no significant changes in the group and group-time interaction in the CGI and PANSS scores in different BC type groups. Conclusions: Schizophrenia patients under SGAs treatment had a higher proportion of unbalanced BC types which may lead to poorer physical or mental statuses, such as overweight problems. Health care providers could apply interventions according to patients’ BC types for disease prevention. Full article
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