Special Issue "Coastal Geomorphology"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Marta Pérez Arlucea

Department of Marine Geosciences and Territorial Planification, The University of Vigo, Spain
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: Coastal environments; shore processes; sediment architecture and geomorphology; deep marine environment (slope and basin deposits and processes).

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal environments are essential for human development as they provide many services (touristic activities, fisheries, housing, risk reduction and protection from flooding, amid others). Thus, these environments are under increased pressure. Following this line, this Special Issue of Geosciences aims to assemble high-quality, innovative and original research articles on the study of “Coastal Geomorphology” to advance the state-of-the-art knowledge of research techniques and scientific advances on the study of coastal environments, including morphodynamics, 3D geometric models, sediment dynamics, and distribution.

There are several issues regarding ongoing climate change and anthropogenic pressures, such as sea level rise, flooding, land loss by inundation in wetlands, deltas, etc.; the impact of extreme events and erosion, and several other problems, which are causing an increased concern on coastal management and preservation. The study of different scale, morphological changes caused by all the involved processes are of high relevance for different methodological approaches, chiefly from multi-disciplinary studies (geophysical techniques, such as GPR (ground-penetrating radar), 2D and 3D DEM (digital elevation model) models, aerial photography, remote sensing and GIS (geographic information system), core analysis, morphometric models, numerical modeling, etc.).

Other aspects include the understanding of the decadal influence of climate modes on coastal dynamics and geomorphology or the impact of extreme events causing coastal erosion, such as storm surges and, in a different context, tsunamis. Apart from those mentioned above, there are a wide variety of aspects involving impacts of natural or anthropogenic processes in the recent decades that can be approached from both the technical or scientific points of view.

Prof. Marta Pérez-Arlucea
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coastal Morphodynamics
  • Morphometry
  • Coastal flooding and erosion
  • Land loss and immersion
  • Coastal environments and management
  • Coastal hazards
  • Sediment dynamics
  • GPS, Laser Scanner, and LiDAR mapping
  • GPR and 3D models
  • Dune stabilization
  • Human impacts on the coast
  • Impact of climate modes

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Sediment Budget and Geomorphological Evolution of the Estuarine Dune-Beach System on Three Nourished Beaches, Delaware Bay, New Jersey
Geosciences 2019, 9(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9010016
Received: 17 November 2018 / Revised: 14 December 2018 / Accepted: 20 December 2018 / Published: 27 December 2018
PDF Full-text (22753 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Beach nourishment was applied at three fetch-restricted sites along the estuarine margin of Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Evaluation of geomorphological performance of the nourishment project was conducted through seasonal monitoring to track linear features (shoreline, dune crest, peat edge) and to create digital [...] Read more.
Beach nourishment was applied at three fetch-restricted sites along the estuarine margin of Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Evaluation of geomorphological performance of the nourishment project was conducted through seasonal monitoring to track linear features (shoreline, dune crest, peat edge) and to create digital elevation models (DEMs). Comparisons of the DEMs yielded sediment budgets of the updrift, fill area, and downdrift zones as well as the spatial and temporal evolution of the tidal flat, beach, and dune features within the zones. Through four years, Moore’s Beach lost all of the emplaced fill as well as an additional −5446 m3 from the fill area. The shoreline position shifted inland −12.78 m, and the foredune crest shifted inland −9.23 m. The fill area at Pierce’s Point lost all of the fill and an additional −3810 m3. The shoreline and dune crest shifted inland −7.35 m and −1.17 m, respectively. The Reed’s Beach study area benefited from beach fill updrift that more than offset the losses in the fill area, a net gain of 2107 m3. There was a major contrast in volumetric change between the updrift and downdrift portions. Sediment budget calculations established alongshore transport was an important factor in the fetch-restricted estuarine environment driving the variable geomorphological responses in the updrift, fill, and downdrift zones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Geomorphology)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Alongshore Variability in the Response of a Mixed Sand and Gravel Beach to Bimodal Wave Direction
Geosciences 2018, 8(12), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8120488
Received: 9 November 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 10 December 2018 / Published: 14 December 2018
PDF Full-text (4564 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Characterising spatial and temporal variations in coastal behaviour is essential for the management of beach systems. Recent studies have shown that beach response is more complex in coasts subjected to bimodal wave directions. Despite being pervasive at higher latitudes, relatively little is known [...] Read more.
Characterising spatial and temporal variations in coastal behaviour is essential for the management of beach systems. Recent studies have shown that beach response is more complex in coasts subjected to bimodal wave directions. Despite being pervasive at higher latitudes, relatively little is known about the spatial variability in the response of mixed sand and gravel beaches. This work presents evidence that the response of mixed sand and gravel beaches to bimodal wave directions can be highly variable (both in magnitude and direction of change) even within short shoreline stretches. The analyses focused on beach topography data collected between 2009 and 2018 along five cross-shore transects within a 2-km-long shoreline in Suffolk (East England) and offshore wave data recorded at the West Gabbard Smart buoy. The dominant offshore wave direction oscillates between the southwest and the northeast from year to year, and the bimodal beach sediment has modes at 0.35 mm and 16 mm. Analyses were undertaken considering two timeframes: Biannual surveys from January 2009 to February 2018, and more intensive surveying (from seasonal to pre- and post-storm) from July 2016 to March 2018. Results highlighted large differences in beach response even between transects 350 m apart and no clear seasonal pattern of change. Instead, response seemed to depend on a complex interaction between wave power, dominant wave direction, and local settings. Although correlations were identified between indicators of beach change and wave conditions, these varied across transects. Divergence of longshore transport may occur locally, likely influencing the high alongshore variability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Geomorphology)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Morphodynamics Assessment by Means of Mesoforms and Video-Monitoring in a Dissipative Beach
Geosciences 2018, 8(12), 448; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8120448
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 18 November 2018 / Accepted: 24 November 2018 / Published: 30 November 2018
PDF Full-text (12436 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study a video-monitoring system was used to analyze the presence of mesoforms during a time period of five years in the urban beach of La Victoria, Cádiz, Spain. This technique allowed the generation of plan views using an improved version of [...] Read more.
In this study a video-monitoring system was used to analyze the presence of mesoforms during a time period of five years in the urban beach of La Victoria, Cádiz, Spain. This technique allowed the generation of plan views using an improved version of ULISES software. The presence and spatiotemporal variability of the most common mesoforms, such as bars and cusps, was identified in all the plan views. Furthermore, the morphodynamic state of the beach was investigated in combination with local hydrodynamic data. The cusp systems were also studied by means of wavelet analyses and different theories on cusps formation were tested. The presence of the investigated features was related to the wave energy and its seasonal variations. The behavior of the mesoforms demonstrated the important role of a subtidal rocky outcrop in the nearshore processes. The results also show that bars and cusps as indicators of the nearshore processes are a useful tool for the macroscopic analysis of surf zone dynamics in dissipative beaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Geomorphology)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Methodology for Improving the Analysis, Interpretation, and Geo-Visualisation of Erosion Rates in Coastal Beaches—Andalusia, Southern Spain
Geosciences 2018, 8(9), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8090335
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 September 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8586 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Erosion is one of the major issues currently facing coastal areas. Some consequences of this process are beach loss and higher flood risk, which will likely be exacerbated given ongoing sea-level rise. With this in mind, those responsible for conservation and management decisions [...] Read more.
Erosion is one of the major issues currently facing coastal areas. Some consequences of this process are beach loss and higher flood risk, which will likely be exacerbated given ongoing sea-level rise. With this in mind, those responsible for conservation and management decisions need appropriate tools with which to identify critical coastal areas, as well as to analyse, interpret, and visualise them with the appropriate geomorphological and environmental background. The aim of this work was to present a methodology for improving the analysis and interpretation of coastal erosion rates, as well as to guarantee wide access and dissemination of erosion data. To that end, an approach for the production, management, and dissemination of shoreline erosion data for the Andalusian coast in Southern Spain was developed. This approach enables the analysis and interpretation of the erosion rates in coasts by linking erosion rates with geomorphological and thematic information using a data model. Additionally, this methodology was proven to be a valid and appropriate tool for the design of a web-based viewer, being the best way to represent the erosion rates obtained every 50 m of shore for the entire Andalusian coast, being an exposed coastal front 917 km long. This is particularly useful for integrated coastal zone management schemes, enabling quick and easy access to valuable information. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Geomorphology)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle A Multi-Scale Conceptual Model of Flood-Tide Delta Morphodynamics in Micro-Tidal Estuaries
Geosciences 2018, 8(9), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8090324
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 16 August 2018 / Accepted: 23 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
PDF Full-text (8408 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wave and tide induced sediment transport pathways and rates govern the morphological evolution of estuarine systems. An understanding of the morphodynamics of these systems is required to maintain their commercial, biological and recreational value. The morphodynamics of Port Stephens estuary, a micro-tidal estuary [...] Read more.
Wave and tide induced sediment transport pathways and rates govern the morphological evolution of estuarine systems. An understanding of the morphodynamics of these systems is required to maintain their commercial, biological and recreational value. The morphodynamics of Port Stephens estuary, a micro-tidal estuary located on a wave dominated southeast coast of Australia were investigated using bathymetric surveys and current velocity data from several locations over the estuary. This provided detailed insight into the rates and direction of movement for the main sedimentary features of the system, and how these features interact with the processes that drive their evolution. We used these findings to develop a conceptual model for estuarine morphodynamics that accounts for fair weather and storm conditions. Our model explains how sediment eroded from the estuarine beaches is trapped by the adjacent flood-tide delta. The model is applicable to fetch-limited estuaries that do not have offshore sources of sediment, where the tidal currents are weak in relation to the incident ocean waves, and that have a wide, stable entrance through which ocean waves can propagate into the estuary. The model is multi-scale in that it encapsulates both short-term and local process, and large scale evolution of an estuary; therefore, it represents a tool that may be used in developing sustainable estuary management strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Geomorphology)
Figures

Figure 1

Geosciences EISSN 2076-3263 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top