Special Issue "Analysis of the Kinematic Evolution of Active Landslides"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Piernicola Lollino
Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection IRPI, Italian National Research Council, Italy
Interests: natural hazards; geotechnical engineering; engineering geology; rock and soil slope stability; numerical Modelling; landslide propagation analysis; underground cave stability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The assessment of the kinematical evolution of slow landslides is challenging for the analysis and zonation of risk for landslide areas interacting with structures and infrastructure. Detecting the displacement rate field of the different sectors of a slow landslide, along with the factors controlling these trends, can represent a fundamental source of knowledge to derive important information for the prediction of the expected damage to buildings and infrastructure over years, and to define efficient risk mitigation strategies. The kinematical trend of an active landslide is generally the effect of the combination of resisting and driving factors, giving rise to a specific function of variation of landslide displacement rate over time.

This Special Issue is expected to collect scientific peer-reviewed contributions that could provide advancements in the interpretation of active landslide processes, with regard to the role of specific factors, as the geometrical and geological landslide features, the pore water pressure regime, the soil mobilized strength, the soil viscosity, to mention a few. Such analyses generally require the application of analytical models or numerical models, either two-dimensional and three-dimensional, as well as the use of field monitoring data in order to derive indications on the influence of the specific factors in the active landslide behavior. Moreover, satellite interferometry techniques have recently allowed to obtain spatial and temporal evolution of slow deformation phenomena over long time spans. Case studies, as well as theoretical solutions, are welcome.

Dr. Piernicola Lollino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • landslide displacement rate
  • pore water pressures
  • soil mobilized strength
  • analytical model
  • numerical modeling
  • in-situ monitoring
  • viscosity

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Statistical Analysis Models for Susceptibility Assessment of Earthquake-Triggered Landslides: A Case Study from 2015 Earthquake in Lefkada Island
Geosciences 2019, 9(8), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9080350 - 09 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to comparatively assess the susceptibility of earthquake-triggered landslides in the island of Lefkada (Ionian Islands, Greece) using two different statistical analysis models, a bivariate model represented by frequency ratio (FR), and a multivariate model represented by [...] Read more.
The main purpose of this study is to comparatively assess the susceptibility of earthquake-triggered landslides in the island of Lefkada (Ionian Islands, Greece) using two different statistical analysis models, a bivariate model represented by frequency ratio (FR), and a multivariate model represented by logistic regression (LR). For the implementation of the models, the relationship between geo-environmental factors contributing to landslides and documented events related to the 17th November 2015 earthquake was investigated by geographic information systems (GIS)-based analysis. A landslide inventory with events attributed to the specific earthquake was prepared using satellite imagery interpretation and field surveys. Eight factors: Elevation, slope angle, slope aspect, distance to main road network, distance to faults, land cover, geology, and peak ground acceleration (PGA), were considered and used as thematic data layers. The prediction capability of the models and the accuracy of the resulting susceptibility maps were tested by a standard validation method, the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Based on the validation results, the output map with the highest reliability could potentially constitute an ideal basis for use within regional spatial planning as well as for the organization of emergency actions by local authorities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of the Kinematic Evolution of Active Landslides)
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Open AccessArticle
Satellite Pre-Failure Detection and In Situ Monitoring of the Landslide of the Tunnel du Chambon, French Alps
Geosciences 2019, 9(7), 313; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9070313 - 16 Jul 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Recent studies using satellite data have shown a growing interest in detecting and anticipating landslide failures. However, their value for an actual landslide prediction has shown variable results. Therefore, the use of satellite images for that purpose still requires additional attention. Here, we [...] Read more.
Recent studies using satellite data have shown a growing interest in detecting and anticipating landslide failures. However, their value for an actual landslide prediction has shown variable results. Therefore, the use of satellite images for that purpose still requires additional attention. Here, we study the landslide of the Tunnel du Chambon in the French Alps that ruptured in July 2015, generating major impacts on economic activity and infrastructures. To evaluate the contribution of very high-resolution optical satellite images to characterize and potentially anticipate the landslide failure, we conduct here a retro analysis of its evolution. Two time periods are analyzed: September 2012 to September 2014, and May to July 2015. We combine Pléiades optical images analysis and geodetic measurements from in situ topographic monitoring. Satellite images were correlated to detect pre-failure motions, showing 1.4-m of displacement between September 2012 and September 2014. In situ geodetic measures were used to analyze motions during the main activity of the landslide in June and July 2015. Topographic measurements highlight different areas of deformations and two periods of strong activity, related to the last stage of the tertiary creep and to anthropic massive purges of unstable masses. The law of acceleration toward the rupture observed in June and July 2015 over the topographic targets also fits well the satellite observation between 2012 and 2014, showing that the landslide probably already entered into tertiary creep 2.5 years before its failure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of the Kinematic Evolution of Active Landslides)
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Open AccessArticle
Landslide Hazard and Risk Assessment for a Natural Gas Pipeline Project: The Case of the Trans Adriatic Pipeline, Albania Section
Geosciences 2019, 9(2), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9020061 - 28 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The paper focuses on the assessment of landslide hazard and risk along or across the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) natural gas pipeline project in Albania. TAP is a natural gas pipeline that will transport gas from the Caspian Sea to Europe, crossing Northern [...] Read more.
The paper focuses on the assessment of landslide hazard and risk along or across the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) natural gas pipeline project in Albania. TAP is a natural gas pipeline that will transport gas from the Caspian Sea to Europe, crossing Northern Greece and Southern Albania. It has long been recognised that landsliding is a major factor for TAP’s pipeline route selection in mountainous regions, especially the challenging area of central Albania. Experience from similar major pipelines has shown that hazard avoidance is generally the most cost- and time-efficient strategy to minimise the landslide risk since geohazard-related decision-making is usually risk-based. For landslides, the risk profile is expected to be dominated by the upslope expansion of existing landslides, resulting in a loss of ridge crest (where the Right of Way (RoW) is usually located), possibly leading to pipeline rupture. However, it is still possible that new landslides could develop under static and/or seismic conditions, especially on steep ridge flanks along the route. An expert determination approach was adopted to define a consensus for the estimate of the risk (i.e., chance of rupture) for the pipeline at eighty-two (82) identified landslide sites in Albania, to identify “hot spots” along the route, where risk-reduction measures could be prioritised. Ten landslides were characterised as “High Risk”, fifteen as “Medium Risk” and nineteen as “Low Risk”. Following this risk assessment, two large re-routings, as well as several local re-routings, were considered. Further investigation was required to identify the site-specific geotechnical conditions and probable remedial measures in cases where landslides could not be avoided by rerouting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of the Kinematic Evolution of Active Landslides)
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Open AccessArticle
Operative Monographies: Development of a New Tool for the Effective Management of Landslide Risks
Geosciences 2018, 8(12), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8120485 - 14 Dec 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Active landslide risk assessment and management are primarily based on the availability of dedicated studies and monitoring activities. The establishment of decision support for the efficient management of active landslides threatening urban areas is a worthwhile contribution. Nowadays, consistent information about major landslide [...] Read more.
Active landslide risk assessment and management are primarily based on the availability of dedicated studies and monitoring activities. The establishment of decision support for the efficient management of active landslides threatening urban areas is a worthwhile contribution. Nowadays, consistent information about major landslide hazards is obtained through an interdisciplinary approach, consisting of field survey data and long-time monitoring, with the creation of a high populated dataset. Nevertheless, the large number and variety of acquired data can generate some criticalities in their management. Data fragmentation and a missing standard format of the data should represent a serious hitch in landslide hazard management. A good organization in a standard format can be a good operative solution. Based on standardized approaches such as the ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization), we developed a standard document called operative monography. This document summarizes all available information by organizing monitoring data and identifying possible lacks. We tested this approach in the Aosta Valley Region (NW Italy) on five different slow moving landslides monitored for twenty years. The critical analysis of the available dataset modifies a simple sequence of information in a more complex document, adoptable by local and national authorities for a more effective management of active landslides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of the Kinematic Evolution of Active Landslides)
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