Special Issue "New Directions in Latinx/Latin American Philosophy"

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Carlos Alberto Sánchez
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Philosophy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192, USA
Interests: Latin American philosophy, Hispanics/Latinos in the US

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

As Latinx/Latin American philosophy enters what has been called a period of “normalization,” there is a need to take stock of our futures. A few decades ago, it was an urgent necessity to inventory our philosophical history, to recover figures, traditions, and methodologies for the sake of a future we foresaw; a future which is now. Today, the imperative is to affirm the existence and the value of a Latinx and Latin American tradition that has, in the US, been appropriated by Latinx philosophy, and to outline its future trajectory, to establish potential directions for a wide-ranging research agenda that may move Latinx and Latin American philosophy well into the 22nd century. The purpose of this special issue is to bring together work that leans forward in such a way, that gives us current or future “new directions” in Latinx and Latin American philosophy, while remaining planted in its history, it’s genealogy. The scope of the issue will not be limited to one tradition or methodology, but will be open to all traditions and methodologies related to Latinx and Latin American philosophy broadly construed. We thus invite submissions of philosophical work that engages the future of Latinx and Latin American philosophy as this is currently understood.

Prof. Carlos Alberto Sánchez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Latin American philosophy
  • Latin philosophy
  • comparative philosophy social
  • political philosophy
  • multicultural philosophy
  • non-traditional philosophy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mexican Genealogy: From Pelados and Pachucos to New Mestizas
Genealogy 2020, 4(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010012 - 21 Jan 2020
Abstract
This essay examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of two Mexican philosophers in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera: Samuel Ramos and Octavio Paz. We argue that although neither of these authors is cited in her seminal work, Anzaldúa had them both in mind [...] Read more.
This essay examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of two Mexican philosophers in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera: Samuel Ramos and Octavio Paz. We argue that although neither of these authors is cited in her seminal work, Anzaldúa had them both in mind through the writing process and that their ideas are present in the text itself. Through a genealogical reading of Borderlands/La Frontera, and aided by archival research, we demonstrate how Anzaldúa’s philosophical vision of the “new mestiza” is a critical continuation of the broader tradition known as la filosofía de lo mexicano, which flourished during a golden age of Mexican philosophy (1910–1960). Our aim is to open new directions in Latinx and Latin American philosophy by presenting Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera as a profound scholarly encounter with two classic works of Mexican philosophy, Ramos’ Profile of Man and Culture in Mexico and Paz’s The Labyrinth of Solitude. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in Latinx/Latin American Philosophy)
Open AccessArticle
The Biopolitics of Immigration: A Genealogy of the “Hispanic Paradox”
Genealogy 2020, 4(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010002 - 21 Dec 2019
Abstract
The “Hispanic Paradox” refers to the epidemiological finding that, despite a lower socioeconomic status, Hispanics tend to have health outcomes (especially regarding mortality rates and life expectancy) that are similar to, if not better than, US non-Hispanic Whites. Within the public health literature, [...] Read more.
The “Hispanic Paradox” refers to the epidemiological finding that, despite a lower socioeconomic status, Hispanics tend to have health outcomes (especially regarding mortality rates and life expectancy) that are similar to, if not better than, US non-Hispanic Whites. Within the public health literature, a number of explanations have been proposed focusing on reproductive and fertility rates, biological differences, cultural and lifestyle advantages, the impact of selective migration to the US, among others. Despite the abundant literature on this topic since the late 1980s, little work has been done on the paradox from a philosophical perspective. In this paper, I seek to address this gap by offering a genealogy of the “Hispanic Paradox.” The bulk of this paper, then, focuses on exposing how the development of the Hispanic Paradox is epistemically tied to the prevailing anti-immigration discourse of the 1980s and 1990s. By highlighting the relationship between these two phenomena, this paper proposes a new direction for research into the biopolitics of immigration. More specifically, this paper suggests that the discourses of the “browning of America” and the Hispanic Paradox reveal a specifically biopolitical concern over the longevity of the United States as a White-majority country. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in Latinx/Latin American Philosophy)
Open AccessArticle
Writing Belonging: An Antillean Conversation Between Luisa Capetillo and Ofelia Rodríguez Acosta
Genealogy 2019, 3(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3040067 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
This essay comparatively reads the intellectual contributions of Luisa Capetillo and Ofelia Rodríguez Acosta. I argue that Capetillo and Rodríguez Acosta offer unique and under-appreciated perspectives on what I term the assemblages of belonging that resist the regulatory normalization of sexuality and the [...] Read more.
This essay comparatively reads the intellectual contributions of Luisa Capetillo and Ofelia Rodríguez Acosta. I argue that Capetillo and Rodríguez Acosta offer unique and under-appreciated perspectives on what I term the assemblages of belonging that resist the regulatory normalization of sexuality and the reduction of the maternal body as the source of home and place making in the context of Puerto Rico and Cuba respectively. As the paper demonstrates, what it means to belong, in the context of Antillean women writers, is not entirely tied to a particular place or the identity of people. Rather, belonging is assembled through tactics that are always already decentered given the status of womanhood and its interpellations in the Caribbean at the turn of the 20th century, which was performatively accomplished through the acts of writing and reading. I argue that Capetillo and Rodríguez Acosta assemble notions of belonging through performative mechanisms that place them at the cross-roads between the affective, embodied, and relational dimensions of what it means to belong in a place that is not and continues not to be for any(body). Thus, they both betray the idea of being on one side or another. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in Latinx/Latin American Philosophy)
Open AccessArticle
“The Atlas of Our Skin and Bone and Blood”: Disability, Ablenationalism, and the War on Drugs
Genealogy 2019, 3(4), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3040062 - 15 Nov 2019
Abstract
This paper explores the relationship between disability and the aspirational health of the civic body through an analysis of the criminalization of immigration and the war on drugs. In particular, this paper utilizes tools from transnational disability studies to examine the formation and [...] Read more.
This paper explores the relationship between disability and the aspirational health of the civic body through an analysis of the criminalization of immigration and the war on drugs. In particular, this paper utilizes tools from transnational disability studies to examine the formation and maintenance of a form of ablenationalism operating within immigration reform and drug-related policies. Specifically, the militarization of border zones, as well as the vast austerity measures impacting people across North, Central, and South America have shaped notions of public health, safety, and security according to racial, gendered, and settler logics of futurity. The final section of the paper turns to three authors who have been situated in various ways on the margins of the United States, Gloria Anzaldúa (the Mexico-U.S. border), Aurora Levins Morales (Puerto Rico), and Margo Tamez (Lipan Apache). As such, this article analyzes the liberatory, affective, and future-oriented dimensions of disabled life and experience to chart possibilities for resistance to the converging momentum of carceral settler states, transnational healthcare networks, and racial capitalism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in Latinx/Latin American Philosophy)
Open AccessArticle
Aztec Metaphysics—Two Interpretations of an Evanescent World
Genealogy 2019, 3(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3040059 - 14 Nov 2019
Abstract
This paper contrasts two contemporary approaches to Nahua metaphysics by focusing on the stance of the Nahua tlamatinime (philosophers) regarding the nature of reality. Miguel León-Portilla and James Maffie offer the two most comprehensive interpretations of Nahua philosophy. Although León-Portilla and Maffie agree [...] Read more.
This paper contrasts two contemporary approaches to Nahua metaphysics by focusing on the stance of the Nahua tlamatinime (philosophers) regarding the nature of reality. Miguel León-Portilla and James Maffie offer the two most comprehensive interpretations of Nahua philosophy. Although León-Portilla and Maffie agree on their interpretation of teotl as the evanescent principle of Nahua metaphysics, their interpretations regarding the tlamatinime metaphysical stances diverge. Maffie argues that León-Portilla attributes to the tlamatinime a metaphysics of being according to which being means permanence and stability and thus, since earthly things are continuously changing, being cannot be predicated of them, hence earthly things are not real. I present textual support to show that León-Portilla does not read Nahua metaphysics through the lens of a metaphysics of being and thus that León-Portilla does not interpret the tlamatinime as denying the reality of earthly things. I then provide an exegetical analysis of León-Portilla’s texts to show that, in his interpretation, metaphysical concerns are intimately linked to existential questions regarding the meaning of human life. Ultimately, I argue that, in León-Portilla’s interpretation, the tlamatinime conception of art functions as poiesis, that is, as the process of aesthetic creation that gives meaning to human life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in Latinx/Latin American Philosophy)
Open AccessArticle
The Roots of Carlos Vaz Ferreira’s Philosophy
Genealogy 2019, 3(4), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3040057 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Carlos Vaz Ferreira (1872–1958) was Uruguay’s leading twentieth-century philosopher. He worked on social and political philosophy, moral philosophy, aesthetics, and feminism. Considered to be one of Latin America’s most original thinkers, Vaz Ferreira’s philosophy was nonetheless responsive to and, in some cases, influenced [...] Read more.
Carlos Vaz Ferreira (1872–1958) was Uruguay’s leading twentieth-century philosopher. He worked on social and political philosophy, moral philosophy, aesthetics, and feminism. Considered to be one of Latin America’s most original thinkers, Vaz Ferreira’s philosophy was nonetheless responsive to and, in some cases, influenced by the work of a number of other figures. This article explores Vaz Ferreira’s roots in the thought of Herbert Spencer, Charles Darwin, Dr. Gregorio Marañón, Benito Jerónimo Feijóo y Montenegro, Harald Höffding, Hugo Münsterberg, Wilhelm Dilthey, Miguel de Unamuno, John Stuart Mill, William James, José Enrique Rodó, and Henri Bergson. His feminist philosophy was influenced by his sister, María Eugenia Vaz Ferreira, Dr. Paulina Luisi, and other suffragists. I seek to distinguish among the influences Vaz Ferreira ultimately rejected, those he could not escape, those he adapted, and those he most favored as he developed his unique philosophy of freedom. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in Latinx/Latin American Philosophy)
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