Special Issue "Theory and Observations of Galactic Outflows"

A special issue of Galaxies (ISSN 2075-4434).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Bernd Husemann

Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: AGN outflows; galaxy evolution; dual AGN; IFU surveys; AGN variability
Guest Editor
Dr. Dominika Wylezalek

European Southern Observatory, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: AGN feedback and its role in galaxy evolution; AGN and feedback signatures; galaxy kinematics; IFU surveys; built-up of structure in the universe
Guest Editor
Dr. I-Ting Ho

Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: galactic outflows; chemical abundance; chemical evolution; IFU surveys

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The regulation of star formation appears to be a key ingredient in the evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. One of the main issues in galaxy evolution across cosmic time regards regulating star formation processes in galaxies and the built-up of their mass. Galactic Outflows, which are capable of lifting gas from their galaxies out to their halo, is one important process to be considered in conjunction with gas fueling and the efficiency of forming stars. While Galactic Outflows have been observed in various types of galaxies and can be driven by star formation, active galactic nuclei (AGN), powerful radio jets and shocks, a coherent physical picture has not emerged yet. Nevertheless, simple theoretical prescriptions of Galactic Outflows have successfully been implemented into cosmological simulation to reproduce key properties of galaxy populations. Furthermore, high-resolution simulations on the interactions with Galactic Outflows and the complex multi-phase medium in galaxies have been performed, but observations are necessary to constrain physical model parameters.

In this Special Issue, we aim to review and collect original work on both observations and theory of Galactic Outflows. The emphasis here is to develop an understanding of the properties of Galactic Outflows with the goal of obtaining a perspective of their impact on the evolution of galaxies. Some of the non-exhaustive list of key topics to be covered are given as examples:

  • Detection and surveys of Galactic outflows
  • Estimation and measurements of Galactic outflow energetics
  • Driving mechanisms of Galactic outflows
  • Observations and theory of the multi-phase nature of Galactic outflows
  • Connecting simulations and observations of Galactic outflows
  • The fate of the outflowing material: escaping versus falling back
  • Triggering of Galactic Outflows and their expansion through the galaxy
  • The immediate vs. long-term impact of Galactic Outflows on galaxy evolution

Submission of reviews, as well as focused research articles, are welcome.

Dr. Bernd Husemann
Dr. Dominika Wylezalek
Dr. I-Ting Ho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Galaxies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Galactic outflows
  • AGN
  • Starburst galaxies
  • radio jets
  • star formation
  • galaxy evolution

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview A Review of Recent Observations of Galactic Winds Driven by Star Formation
Galaxies 2018, 6(4), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/galaxies6040138
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 5 December 2018 / Published: 9 December 2018
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Abstract
Galaxy-scale outflows of gas, or galactic winds (GWs), driven by energy from star formation are a pivotal mechanism for regulation of star formation in the current model of galaxy evolution. Observations of this phenomenon have proliferated through the wide application of old techniques
[...] Read more.
Galaxy-scale outflows of gas, or galactic winds (GWs), driven by energy from star formation are a pivotal mechanism for regulation of star formation in the current model of galaxy evolution. Observations of this phenomenon have proliferated through the wide application of old techniques on large samples of galaxies, the development of new methods, and advances in telescopes and instrumentation. I review the diverse portfolio of direct observations of stellar GWs since 2010. Maturing measurements of the ionized and neutral gas properties of nearby winds have been joined by exciting new probes of molecular gas and dust. Low-z techniques have been newly applied in large numbers at high z. The explosion of optical and near-infrared 3D imaging spectroscopy has revealed the complex, multiphase structure of nearby GWs. These observations point to stellar GWs being a common feature of rapidly star-forming galaxies throughout at least the second half of cosmic history, and suggest that scaling relationships between outflow and galaxy properties persist over this period. The simple model of a modest-velocity, biconical flow of multiphase gas and dust perpendicular to galaxy disks continues to be a robust descriptor of these flows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theory and Observations of Galactic Outflows)
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Open AccessReview A Review of the Theory of Galactic Winds Driven by Stellar Feedback
Galaxies 2018, 6(4), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/galaxies6040114
Received: 30 August 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
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Abstract
Galactic winds from star-forming galaxies are crucial to the process of galaxy formation and evolution, regulating star formation, shaping the stellar mass function and the mass-metallicity relation, and enriching the intergalactic medium with metals. Galactic winds associated with stellar feedback may be driven
[...] Read more.
Galactic winds from star-forming galaxies are crucial to the process of galaxy formation and evolution, regulating star formation, shaping the stellar mass function and the mass-metallicity relation, and enriching the intergalactic medium with metals. Galactic winds associated with stellar feedback may be driven by overlapping supernova explosions, radiation pressure of starlight on dust grains, and cosmic rays. Galactic winds are multiphase, the growing observations of emission and absorption of cold molecular, cool atomic, ionized warm and hot outflowing gas in a large number of galaxies have not been completely understood. In this review article, I summarize the possible mechanisms associated with stars to launch galactic winds, and review the multidimensional hydrodynamic, radiation hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of winds based on various algorithms. I also briefly discuss the theoretical challenges and possible future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theory and Observations of Galactic Outflows)
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