Special Issue "Remote Sensing of Fire and Its Impact on Land and Atmosphere"

A special issue of Fire (ISSN 2571-6255).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Martin Wooster

Professor of Earth Observation Science, ​​NERC National Center for Earth Observation & Department of Geography, King's College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0)20 7848 2577
Interests: global biomass burning; remote sensing​ of active fire and FRP; emissions factors; fire emissions; air quality; in situ and UAV measurements
Guest Editor
Dr. Luigi Boschetti

Department of Natural Resources and Society, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: (+1)208-885-6508
Interests: Global Biomass, Burning Remote Sensing of Fire, Forest Monitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) has operated since 1997, and has, as its overall objective, to improve the quality and availability of observations of forests and land cover at regional and global scales, to produce useful, timely and validated informational products from these data for a wide variety of users, and to promote international networks for data access, data sharing, and international collaboration. GOFC-GOLD operates a series of themes, including the GOFC-GOLD ‘Fire’ theme, which aims at refining and articulating the international requirements for fire related observations, and making the best possible use of fire products from existing and future satellite observing systems, for fire management, policy decision-making and Earth system science and global change research.

The GOFC-GOLD Fire Implementation Team (IT) is an international forum that, together with the Reginal Networks, leads the GOFC-GOLD Fire Theme activities:

  • to ensure the provision of long-term, systematic satellite observations necessary for the production of a full suite of fire products.
  • to bring together fire data providers and fire data users to exchange information on capabilities and needs.
  • to provide within the regional network a forum for users and researchers operating in (or with an interest in) a common geographic area, and represent a link between national agencies and user groups and the global user/producer community.

The GOFC-GOLD Fire Implementation Team (IT) meets at least once a year, and this special issue in the inaugural year of FIRE stems from the meeting held in November 2017 (Windsor, United Kingdom). At this meeting, much of the current state-of-the-art in the use of remotely-sensed data to detect active fire and burned areas was reviewed, and the use of these products to estimate the emissions to the atmosphere that stem from fire activity and to characterize the impact of fires on landscapes and ecology was considered. We invite you to submit articles on these topics, and others related to the remote sensing of landscape fire for this Special Issue, including but not limited to:

  • Derivation and use of active fire mapping and fire radiative power and energy measures
  • Burned area mapping algorithms and dataset derivation
  • Validation of satellite-derived fire information
  • Fire emissions calculations and fire emissions inventory comparison and evaluation
  • Field or laboratory remote sensing of fire and/or fire emissions characteristics
  • Derivation of parameters used within fire emissions models and/or inventories driven by EO
  • Remote sensing of vegetation recovery after fire disturbance
  • Use of UAV’s for study of landscape fires
  • Fire ecology studies making use of remotely sensed information
  • Documented user’s need for fire information, with particular regard to the experience of the regional networks

Authors are required to check and follow specific Instructions to Authors.

Prof. Martin Wooster
Dr. Luigi Boschetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fire is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Satellite Detection Limitations of Sub-Canopy Smouldering Wildfires in the North American Boreal Forest
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
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Abstract
We develop a simulation model for prediction of forest canopy interception of upwelling fire radiated energy from sub-canopy smouldering vegetation fires. We apply this model spatially across the North American boreal forest in order to map minimum detectable sub-canopy smouldering fire size for
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We develop a simulation model for prediction of forest canopy interception of upwelling fire radiated energy from sub-canopy smouldering vegetation fires. We apply this model spatially across the North American boreal forest in order to map minimum detectable sub-canopy smouldering fire size for three satellite fire detection systems (sensor and algorithm), broadly representative of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). We evaluate our results according to fire management requirements for “early detection” of wildland fires. In comparison to the historic fire archive (Canadian National Fire Database, 1980–2017), satellite data with a 1000 m pixel size used with an algorithm having a minimum MWIR channel BT elevation threshold of 5 and 3 K above background (e.g., MODIS or SLSTR) proves incapable of providing a sub-0.2 ha smouldering fire detection 70% and 45% of the time respectively, even assuming that the sensor overpassed the relevant location within the correct time window. By contrast, reducing the pixel area by an order of magnitude (e.g., 375 m pixels of VIIRS) and using a 3.5 K active fire detection threshold offers the potential for successfully detecting all fires when they are still below 0.2 ha. Our results represent a ‘theoretical best performance’ of remote sensing systems to detect sub-canopy smoldering fires early in their lifetime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Fire and Its Impact on Land and Atmosphere)
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Open AccessArticle Fire Severity and Vegetation Recovery on Mine Site Rehabilitation Using WorldView-3 Imagery
Received: 6 April 2018 / Revised: 15 June 2018 / Accepted: 2 July 2018 / Published: 3 July 2018
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Abstract
As open-cut coal mines progress towards closure, mining companies have an obligation to provide certainty to stakeholders that their rehabilitated landscapes have the capacity to withstand future disturbance impacts such as fire and drought. This paper describes the assessment of fire severity and
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As open-cut coal mines progress towards closure, mining companies have an obligation to provide certainty to stakeholders that their rehabilitated landscapes have the capacity to withstand future disturbance impacts such as fire and drought. This paper describes the assessment of fire severity and recovery using WorldView-3 spectral indices following an experimental fire in a 19- to 21-year old coal mine rehabilitation in semi-arid Central Queensland, Australia. In a highly heterogeneous reconstructed environment, the differenced Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (dNDVI) outperformed the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) with an overall map accuracy of 65% and 58%, respectively. The combination of red and near infra-red multispectral bands proved more effective at classifying severity compared with the shortwave infra-red, particularly when pre-fire imagery was dominated by highly cured grasses (>70%) and post-fire imagery contained a high coverage of residual ash. Recovery trends using spectral indices demonstrate the trajectory towards vegetation recovery, with 62% of the burnt site demonstrating high regrowth in the first two years following fire. This is supported by in situ recovery trends of understory biomass suggesting that under the study conditions, the rehabilitated site has the capacity to withstand impacts from a wildfire and recover to pre-fire levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Fire and Its Impact on Land and Atmosphere)
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