Special Issue "Fabrication of Special Optical Glass and Polymer Fibres"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Liang Dong
Website
Guest Editor
The Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
Interests: specialty optical fibers, fiber lasers, fiber devices
Prof. Dr. Hwayaw Tam
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: Fabrication of special optical silica fibres and polymer fibres, optical fibre communications, and fibre sensor systems based on fibre Bragg gratings and photonic crystal fibres

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past two decades, a significant number of applications have been developed, outside telecommunications, where optical fibers are rooted. Many of these applications are in the area of optical sources, sensors, and new transmission wavelength (UV, mid-wave IR, and long-wave IR).  Some of notable applications already have already experienced significant commercial success and societal impact, e.g., fiber lasers/sources in industrial material processing and medical imaging, and fiber sensors in oil and gas and homeland security.

Very often, the key developments are novel optical fibers, which incorporate and enable a number of new functionalities. This Special Issue will focus on research in the area of novel materials and fabrication techniques of silica, soft glass, and polymer optical fibers.         

Prof. Liang Dong
Prof. Hwayaw Tam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical fibers
  • Optical fiber fabrication
  • Silica ofibers
  • Softglass fibers
  • Polymer fibers
  • Photonic crytal fibers
  • Photonic bandgap fibers
  • Hollow-core fibers
  • IR fibers
  • Fiber sensors
  • Fiber lasers
  • Fiber devices

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Fiber Connection Method Using a Tapered Silica Fiber Tip for Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers
Fibers 2018, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6010004 - 09 Jan 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
In this work, an alternative method of coupling light into microstructured polymer fibers is presented. The solution consists in using a fiber taper fabricated with a CO2 laser. The connection is formed by inserting a tapered silica tip into the holes of [...] Read more.
In this work, an alternative method of coupling light into microstructured polymer fibers is presented. The solution consists in using a fiber taper fabricated with a CO2 laser. The connection is formed by inserting a tapered silica tip into the holes of a microstructured polymer fiber. This alternative method is duly characterized and the feasibility of such fiber connection to enable the polymer fiber as a displacement sensor is also demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication of Special Optical Glass and Polymer Fibres)
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Open AccessArticle
Strong Light Localization and a Peculiar Feature of Light Leakage in the Negative Curvature Hollow Core Fibers
Fibers 2017, 5(4), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5040043 - 14 Nov 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
In this paper we would like to continue a discussion started in our previous work and devoted to the mechanism of light localization in hollow core microstructured fibers with a noncircular core-cladding boundary. It has been shown in many works that, for waveguide [...] Read more.
In this paper we would like to continue a discussion started in our previous work and devoted to the mechanism of light localization in hollow core microstructured fibers with a noncircular core-cladding boundary. It has been shown in many works that, for waveguide microstructures with different types of core-cladding boundary shape, the positions of the transmission bands’ edges can be predicted by applying the well-known anti–resonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW) model. At the same time, the ARROW model cannot explain the strong light localization and guiding at high material loss inside the transmission bands which are observed in negative curvature hollow core fibers, for example. In this paper we want to clarify our previous findings and consider the light localization process from another point of view, namely, by comparing the light leakage process in waveguide microstructures with different shapes of the core-cladding boundary. The results are discussed based on the ARROW model and a new approach associated with the consideration of spatial dispersion occurring under the interaction of the air core mode with the core-cladding boundary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication of Special Optical Glass and Polymer Fibres)
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Open AccessArticle
Solid Tellurite Optical Fiber Based on Stack-and-Draw Method for Mid-Infrared Supercontinuum Generation
Fibers 2017, 5(4), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5040037 - 25 Sep 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Broadband, high-power mid-infrared (mid-IR) sources are critical for many applications. Compared to alternatives such as fluorides and chalcogenides, tellurite fibers are more robust and can handle much higher power. Tellurite fibers also have high nonlinearity and a material zero dispersion close to 2 [...] Read more.
Broadband, high-power mid-infrared (mid-IR) sources are critical for many applications. Compared to alternatives such as fluorides and chalcogenides, tellurite fibers are more robust and can handle much higher power. Tellurite fibers also have high nonlinearity and a material zero dispersion close to 2 µm, making them ideal for nonlinear processes pumped by Tm-doped silica fiber lasers. In this work, we have demonstrated solid tellurite fibers fabricated by a stack-and-draw process and investigated their potential for broadband mid-IR supercontinuum generation. We have identified that fibers with low dispersion are beneficial and that low residual hydroxyl (OH) is critical for broadband mid-IR supercontinuum generation in tellurite fibers pumped at ~2 µm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication of Special Optical Glass and Polymer Fibres)
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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication and Characterization of Polymer Optical Fibers Doped with Perylene-Derivatives for Fluorescent Lighting Applications
Fibers 2017, 5(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5030028 - 31 Jul 2017
Cited by 15
Abstract
Four different dye-doped polymer optical fibers (POFs) have been fabricated following a two-step fabrication process of preform extrusion and fiber drawing, using poly-(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as host material and dye derivatives from perylene and naphtalimide as active dopants. The side illumination technique (SIT) [...] Read more.
Four different dye-doped polymer optical fibers (POFs) have been fabricated following a two-step fabrication process of preform extrusion and fiber drawing, using poly-(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as host material and dye derivatives from perylene and naphtalimide as active dopants. The side illumination technique (SIT) has been employed in order to determine some optical properties of the fabricated fibers, such as the side illumination coupling efficiency, optical loss coefficients, and their performance under solar simulator excitation. The aim of this work is to investigate the performance of the manufactured fibers for fluorescent lighting applications, specially targeting on fluorescent fiber based solar concentrators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication of Special Optical Glass and Polymer Fibres)
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