Special Issue "3D Printing Functionality: Materials, Sensors, Electromagnetics"

A special issue of Designs (ISSN 2411-9660).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Corey Shemelya
Website
Guest Editor
University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Ave., Lowell, MA, USA
Interests: advanced/additive manufacturing; frequency selective surfaces; metamaterials; electromagnetic materials; printable electronics; RF-Microwave; GHz; THz; Vis-IR

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, there has been a rise in the commercial, industrial, and academic interest in the rapid prototyping technology, commonly referred to as additive manufacturing and 3D printing.  Traditionally, additive technologies have been limited to purely mechanical applications. However, in recent years there has been a surge in advanced manufacturing investigations ranging from printed sensors and antennas to chemical and thermal functional materials.  This additional functionality, incorporated with the ease and speed of traditional additive techniques, has the potential to revolutionize the production processes.  It is expected that advances in functional printing techniques will drastically reduce time-to-market as well as improve overall device functionality.  As such, this Special Issue is intended to examine new techniques, designs, and processes that improve the functionality of printable and 3D printable devices or material systems.  Of particular interest are topics that incorporate multiple means of functionality, whether through mechanical, thermal, electromagnetic, electrical, or chemical means.  

Prof. Dr. Corey Shemelya
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Designs is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • printable materials
  • 3D printing
  • rapid prototyping
  • multi-functionality
  • electromagnetics
  • antennas
  • sensors
  • design-on-demand
  • structural electronics
  • electronics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Interconnections for Additively Manufactured Hybridized Printed Electronics in Harsh Environments
Designs 2020, 4(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs4020014 - 18 Jun 2020
Abstract
The ability to fabricate functional 3D conductive elements via additive manufacturing has opened up a unique sector of ‘hybridized printed electronics’. In doing so, many of the rigid standards (i.e., planar circuit boards, potting, etc.,) of traditional electronics are abandoned. However, one critical [...] Read more.
The ability to fabricate functional 3D conductive elements via additive manufacturing has opened up a unique sector of ‘hybridized printed electronics’. In doing so, many of the rigid standards (i.e., planar circuit boards, potting, etc.,) of traditional electronics are abandoned. However, one critical challenge lies in producing robust and reliable interconnections between conductive inks and traditional hardware, especially when subjected to harsh environments. This research examines select material pairings for the most resilient interconnection. The method of test is wire bond pull testing that would represent a continuous strain on a connection and high acceleration testing of up to 50,000 g that would represent a sudden shock that electronics may experience in a drop or crash. Although these two environments may be similar to an overall energy exerted on the connection, the rate of force exerted may lead to different solutions. The results of this research provide insight into material selection for printed electronic interconnections and a framework for interconnection resiliency assessment, which is a critical aspect in realizing the production of next generation electronics technologies for the most demanding environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing Functionality: Materials, Sensors, Electromagnetics)
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Open AccessConcept Paper
A Shape Optimization Method for Part Design Derived from the Buildability Restrictions of the Directed Energy Deposition Additive Manufacturing Process
Designs 2020, 4(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs4030019 - 01 Jul 2020
Abstract
The design methodologies and part shape algorithms for additive manufacturing (AM) are rapidly growing fields, proven to be of critical importance for the uptake of additive manufacturing of parts with enhanced performance in all major industrial sectors. The current trend for part design [...] Read more.
The design methodologies and part shape algorithms for additive manufacturing (AM) are rapidly growing fields, proven to be of critical importance for the uptake of additive manufacturing of parts with enhanced performance in all major industrial sectors. The current trend for part design is a computationally driven approach where the parts are algorithmically morphed to meet the functional requirements with optimized performance in terms of material distribution. However, the manufacturability restrictions of AM processes are not considered at the primary design phases but at a later post-morphed stage of the part’s design. This paper proposes an AM design method to ensure: (1) optimized material distribution based on the load case and (2) the part’s manufacturability. The buildability restrictions from the direct energy deposition (DED) AM technology were used as input to the AM shaping algorithm to grant high AM manufacturability. The first step of this work was to define the term of AM manufacturability, its effect on AM production, and to propose a framework to estimate the quantified value of AM manufacturability for the given part design. Moreover, an AM design method is proposed, based on the developed internal stresses of the build volume for the load case. Stress tensors are used for the determination of the build orientation and as input for the part morphing. A top-down mesoscale geometric optimization is used to realize the AM part design. The DED Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) rules are used to delimitate the morphing of the part, representing at the same time the freeform mindset of the AM technology. The morphed shape of the part is optimized in terms of topology and AM manufacturability. The topology optimization and AM manufacturability indicator (TMI) is introduced to screen the percentage of design elements that serve topology optimization and the ones that serve AM manufacturability. In the end, a case study for proof of concept is realized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing Functionality: Materials, Sensors, Electromagnetics)
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